Episode 131 – The Time is Right for Better Customer Experiences

Join us as we discuss offering new products to your raving customers, speaking words of encouragement when you aren’t in the room, and making the big leap to do it on your own.

Waste-Composting, Hand-Washing, and Self-Employing – Oh My!

Referenced in the Show

• Lomi – Turn Waste To Compost with a Single Button
Children’s National Hospital
• The Self-Employed Life: Business and Personal Development Strategies That Create Sustainable Success – by Jeffrey Shaw

Host Contact Information

Email Dan: Dan@dangingiss.com

Tweet Dan Gingiss: @DGingiss

Email Joey: JoeyC@JoeyColeman.com

DanGingiss.com

JoeyColeman.com

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Episode Transcript

Download a machine-transcribed, barely edited transcript of Episode 131 here or read it below:
(if anything doesn’t make sense or you have any questions about the transcript – just Contact us!)

Joey Coleman (00:05):
Welcome to Experience This!

Dan Gingiss (00:07):
The podcast that celebrates remarkable customer experiences and inspires you to stand out from the competition by wowing your customers.

Dan Gingiss (00:17):
Each episode, we bring you a healthy dose of inspiring stories, funny interactions, and practical takeaways. Marketing and customer experience thought leader, Dan Gingiss…

Dan Gingiss (00:30):
shares the mic with customer retention and employee experience expert Joey Coleman, helping you to get people talking about your business.

Dan Gingiss (00:40):
So get ready because it’s time to Experience This!

Joey Coleman (00:49):
Get ready for another episode of the Experience This! Show!

Dan Gingiss (00:54):
Join us as we discuss offering new products to your raving fans, speaking words of encouragement when you aren’t in the room, and making the big leap to do it on your own.

Joey Coleman (01:09):
Waste-composting, hand-washing, and self-employing! Oh my!

Joey Coleman (01:14):
we love telling stories and sharing key insights you can implement or avoid based on our experiences. Can you believe that this just happened?!

Joey Coleman (01:28):
Long time listeners to the Experience This Show will remember a conversation that Dan and I had about the amazing compostable cell phone cases made by my Canadian friends at Piela.

Dan Gingiss (01:43):
Well, that would be back in episode 98 of season five. I do believe?!

Joey Coleman (01:46):
Yes, my friend. He’s done it again. Yes, indeed. The team at Pela makes a fantastic compostable cell phone case. And today they released a new product called Lomi. I want to play a audio of their CEO talking about what Lomi is, why it’s important for their customers, why it’s important for the planet and why you should get one. So listen to Matt. As he describes the new offering from Pela called Lomi .

Matt Bertulli (02:22):
What if changing the world was as easy as pushing a button. Hey, I’m Matt from Pela. And I want to introduce you to my friend. Lomi at Pela. We’re a team of engineers and material scientists. And for the last three years, we’ve been creating something truly special, a solution to the world’s garbage problem. Now, before I show you how long he is going to change the world, let’s talk about why you’re going to want one of your home today. Maybe you live in a big city and have agreement program. You know, those little plastic bins with leaky bags under your sink that are amazing at producing smelly gross liquid slugs that nobody wants to touch recommends anybody, or maybe you don’t have agreement system where you live. And instead you throw all your food waste into the garbage, which then goes to a landfill which produces methane, which causes climate change all while still smelling pretty terrible loamy makes your life so much easier. Lomi can compost your food waste, that pesky packaging from your online shopping habit and even biodegradable plastics. Yup. Lomi even works on Pela’s compostable phone cases, all at the push of a button. And as little as a few hours later, your waste has turned into the start of nutrient rich compost, totally mess free and odor neutralized. You probably know us at Piela as the inventors of the world’s first compostable phone case, peels customers have eliminated more than 41.8 million plastic bags worth of garbage in the last five years to create loamy. We’ve spent over three years completing more than 1000 compost tests and endless hours of design and prototyping. Loamy. Isn’t just beautifully designed. It is the world’s best home composter period. Food waste creates 330 billion pounds of garbage in North America. Each year, packaging and plastic represent even more garbage and add that number up even higher loamy makes food waste a thing of the past and helps you cut up to half of your carbon footprint all while making odor neutralized mess, free compost that you can feed your plants, tossing your garden, send it to the green bin or put it in the garbage together. We can do something that politicians and big businesses can’t seem to take any action on actually helping the planet. We can make trash thing of the past, back our project today, and you’ll help us bring Lomi to life.

Joey Coleman (04:25):
Now, I don’t know about you, Dan, but when you hear that, when you first are exposed to Lomi and what…

Dan Gingiss (04:30):
Already bought it! I did. I saw the video and then I, I, I bought it immediately. I’m sold.

Joey Coleman (04:39):
I love it. I love it. So here’s why I wanted to talk about Lomi by the way, I also already purchased my own loamy for at home. Here’s why I wanted to talk about this though. I think we have entered an era where every business on the planet absolutely must take into consideration the environmental impact of their product. And if you have a product that is going to be able to significantly help the environment, it is going to build buzz and build excitement about your offering.

Dan Gingiss (05:14):
I guess I think that’s true. I unfortunately think that environmental issues have become a little bit politicized.

Joey Coleman (05:24):
A little bit?! Understatement of the year.

Dan Gingiss (05:26):
And so I think that is true for a certain group of people. You and I are definitely within those people. The environment is a, is an issue I care very much about. Mostly I think probably fatherhood did that to me, that I felt like I needed to have some responsibility for how I leave the planet for my kids and grandkids. And so it’s an, uh, it’s important for me. And one of the things I liked about this was I’ve tried composting. Now a couple of times I had an electric composter that I plugged in before that was gigantic and it worked for a little while. And then like, you know, the stringy salary got caught in the motors and it was done. I had to throw it away. And then of course introduced her to the problem. Then I, then I went with the, uh, the spinning barrel that I had.

Joey Coleman (06:16):
Oh, the “tumbler of poo” as I like to call it.

Dan Gingiss (06:20):
That works. Okay. But the real problem is, uh, is exactly what Matt was describing at the beginning of the videos. You have this little table, top plastic container. It, you, you know, you want to use compostable bags in it, otherwise you’re, you know, again kind of defeating the purpose of the composer. And since those compostable bags are absolutely horrible, I use two of them. Uh, but the food still seeps through if I don’t change them every day or every other day. And so the whole thing is messy and disgusting and it just kind of leaves you asking why in the world am I doing this? And that’s unfortunate.

Joey Coleman (06:56):
It really is because here’s the thing you’re trying to do the right thing. And yet at every step along the way, it is inconvenient, smelly difficult, logistically challenging. When we lived in Boulder, we had what they call curbside composting and when we moved to Boulder, Colorado, my wife Barrett was ecstatic because she had wanted curbside, composting pretty much her entire life. She’s been a composter for ages. And she thought this would be great. And it was great, but they picked up every other week, which meant we had a trashcan outside where we would put art, double bagged bag of compostable food in there. And I got to tell you, by the time July or August rolled around in that summer heat, it was hard not to vomit carrying the trash bag to the curb for them to pick it up curbside, just because of the aromas wafting out from underneath it.

Dan Gingiss (07:52):
I mean, it was Creole Romas. Yeah. He’s being a little nice,

Joey Coleman (07:57):
It’s absolutely crazy. But what I love about this product is they took all, and it’s not surprising that it took three years of R and D. They took all of the pieces of the puzzle that were annoying to people and simplified them. It’s small, it’s convenient. It doesn’t smell horrible. It doesn’t require all of these plastic bags and it allows people to accomplish what they want to accomplish, which is to do the right thing for the environment. Yeah.

Dan Gingiss (08:27):
I mean, it kind of reminds me, I mean the best innovative products or services are those that really think through every piece of the puzzle and figure out what trips people up and how can we do it differently. And I’m always reminded of, of Uber. And the reason I’m reminded of them, because they’re obviously often cited for being such an innovative company, is that they not only solved all the problems of the passengers and why it was so to hail a cab and never be able to use, you know, the credit card machine was always out and cabbies were rude and all this stuff, but they also solved all the problems for drivers. Drivers didn’t want to carry cash. Drivers didn’t want to have to travel so far away from home, you know, all these things. And they solved, they looked at every pain point of a taxi driver and a taxi passenger, and they fixed them all. And that’s what it looks like. Obviously we haven’t used it yet, but it looks like that’s what they attempted to do here, because that video, I mean, I was nodding my head during that video because, and so were you because, you know, I’ve had the, I’ve had the countertop disaster, you’ve had the smelly garbage going out to the curb. And so they clearly know their audience. They know people that have tried to compost that have, you know, done their best, even if it isn’t working. And it looks like they have really tried to alleviate all of that. If this thing works as well as that video, I can’t wait

Joey Coleman (09:53):
If things, if this thing works as half, as well as the video, it’s going to be fantastic. And here’s why I wanted to talk about this. Some people are listening are thinking, Oh, Joey, seriously, what is it with the environmental product? And like, that’s not applicable to my business. Although see, earlier part of the conversation where I think you need to be taking that into consideration for your business, but here’s the behind the scenes that I think is incredibly relevant. The day that we are recording this podcast segment is the day that the product launched. Now, the folks at Piela sent everyone, all of their customers of which I am one an email a week ago saying we’re going to be launching on Tuesday morning at 9:00 AM Eastern, be one of the first people to sign up. And they did their, uh, their launches on Indiegogo, which if you’re not familiar with this, it’s kind of similar to Kickstarter. You basically go on, you buy a product before it’s made. And then the company uses the money from the pre-orders to help finish the last mile. If you will, of development. I went on at two minutes before it was set to launch and they were already selling. So I was purchaser number 126. And I was super excited because I know the folks in, but I have to admit when I saw that I was purchasing her number 126, I was like, wow, there are other people like me who set their alarms to be ready to rock when this thing launched. And it hasn’t even officially launched, but they’re already buying. And then

Dan Gingiss (11:24):
How many hours later Joey, tell me.

Joey Coleman (11:27):
Yeah, yeah. Wait a second. So, so that was this morning at 8:00 AM local time. So 9:00 AM Eastern, which is 8:00 AM here in Iowa. I got on a phone call. I got off a phone call an hour later. And just for giggles, I went to their site to see how many people had backed the project. This project costs about $300. At that time, they had raised $900,000 in the first hour. And I thought, Oh my gosh, this is amazing. Now, anytime you do a launch, there’s a lot of flood right in the first hour. And so I decided to check back in later in the day and see how they were doing right before we started recording. They were at $1.9 million raised today, today from customers in the time we’ve been talking about it, they are now at 2.15 million.

Dan Gingiss (12:24):
That’s right, because Joey told me about this right before we started recording. So that was at about 9:00 PM local time. So call it 13 hours from when he purchased it. I was then purchaser number 6,486. I believe it was.

Joey Coleman (12:38):
Yes.

Dan Gingiss (12:39):
And they’re now North of 6,500 backers. And as you say, uh, at over $2.1 million and the probably the most impressive statistic is apparently their goal was $50,000. So they’re 4315% ahead of their goal. I’d say that’s a good day.

Joey Coleman (12:57):
Yes. And this is day one of a 30 day campaign. So here’s the moral of the story. Friends. When you build a product and you release it to your raving fans, and that product is in alignment with your brand ethos. If you remember from our previous conversations about Pela, they build compostable cell phone cases. So for them to build a kitchen, countertop, composter is a logical brand extension. And frankly, a much more complicated product than the cell phone cases. But when you do something that’s in alignment and you have raving rabid fans, they will come out and support you like crazy. Now here’s the interesting thing. What will it be like when we turn in tune in, what will it be like when we tune in 30 days from now, when this campaign is over, I’m going to make a prediction. I’m going to predict that they will be somewhere near four and a half million dollars raised in 30 days. They may be higher than that. Here’s hoping, but this is what you can do. If you focus on creating remarkable experiences. When you come out with new products, your customers will be lined up to buy those too. Congratulations to the team at Peal. Congratulations on the launch of the new Lomi product and friends is you’re listening, you’re still within the 30 day limit. Go to the show notes@experiencethisshow.com. We’ll have a prominent link so that you can go get your own Lomi kitchen, top composter.

Joey Coleman (14:31):
You listened to us. Now we want to listen to you! By visiting our website and sharing your remarkable customer experiences with us. We can share them with a broader audience. Now, sit back and enjoy our Listener Stories.

Joey Coleman (14:50):
You ever something on social media, Dan, and think to yourself. Wow, that’s interesting. I’m wondering what the backstory is on that comment.

Dan Gingiss (14:58):
Ah, gosh, I love this segment already. Cause we’re always talking about social media. It’s always exciting when I bring up social media, isn’t it? Yes. And I have no idea where you’re going with this, but yes, of course. I do find that. I want to look for the backstory. Why Joey?

Joey Coleman (15:12):
Right. All right. All right. So here’s the deal. Last week, a friend of mine posted a job listing for a chief experience officer for his company. And he made this posting in a private Facebook group that I’m part of as our loyal listeners know, I am not a regular on social media by any means, but I’m in a couple of what I consider to be highly productive, private Facebook groups and where I just can network and associate and get some good advice with some other folks, so I happened to see this post and this post caught my attention, but one of the comments on the post caught my attention even more. And so I reached out to the person who made the post in order to get the full story and they were kind enough to oblige. It turns out they’re a listener to the show. So Jerry Simpson, the CEO of kite wire was kind enough to share a story about a fascinating and touching experience that he had. Let’s listen to Jerry’s story.

Jere Simpson (16:09):
My absolute favorite customer experiences as a customer happened for me at Children’s Hospital. I was with my youngest son and my wife, my youngest son was having surgery, which is, you know, fills me with a ton of anxiety and a ton of fear and makes me a ball of nerves. And I’m expected in the dynamic of my family to also be emotionally strong support for everybody else. So we get through the whole surgery, you sit there for hours, just waiting nervous. Then you take down a whole bunch of information. Um, what outpatient care is like, and you want to make sure that you don’t forget any of it. And my son is fussy and pain crying, um, and all the way out, I go into the restroom and wash my hands and washing my hands. And I look up and I see on the mirror, hang in there, dad. And it just felt like at the perfect time, somebody put their hand on my shoulder and was support for me. So when I didn’t know, because I knew, they thought about me and they thought about my experience and what I was going through in the first moment of the entire day, where I could be vulnerable just within myself. And I just thought that is such a thoughtful exercise that somebody went through to figure out where was the perfect touch point to put a hand on my shoulder.

Dan Gingiss (17:34):
Oh man, I got the chills listening to that. That is absolutely awesome. And it’s like, they knew he was there, right? It’s like they were literally talking to him. And I love, we’ve talked about proactive customer experience before and sort of anticipatory moments and you know, maybe a whole bunch of dads go in there and they look at that and they’re like, what are they even talking about? But even one guy in clearly one guy was affected by it. But my guess is that tons of dads have been in that same bathroom and have seen that message. And maybe they didn’t post it on Facebook, but it meant something to them. And you know, I also love it because I talk about this all the time. The best experiences don’t have to cost you any money. How long did it take to, or how much money was it to put a sign up on a mirror? Yeah, probably next to none.

Joey Coleman (18:30):
Exactly. And here’s the thing. They don’t necessarily know that it’s going to have the same impact on every person, but what they do know. And what Jerry’s story proves is that when it does have an impact, there is a high likelihood that it’s going to be a significant impact. And I absolutely love this story and thought that it brought up two key points that I wanted to talk about in this segment. First, the importance of creating poignant moments for your customers. And second, the idea of creating the type of interaction that really gets people talking. Now, when we think about poignant moments for our customers, one of the things that a lot of businesses do is customer journey mapping. And that makes perfect sense. But one of the questions I get a lot and I’m sure you do as well. Dan, whenever we speak or we’re on a consulting engagement is well on what day should that touch point come? When should it happen? When should I send that communication? And they want to know often because they want to automate it. And I get that. And that makes perfect sense. But what I think is becoming increasingly more valuable in our automated scheduled society are these un-timed, but geographically placed touch points like a message on the mirror, in the bathroom. We have no idea when a potential dad is going to walk in there. We also know that there’s a lot of men that are going to walk into this bathroom, who aren’t dads, who this message isn’t going to be nearly as poignant, but someone at children’s hospital figured out we can create an untimed moment that if we do it right, maybe the only time that that dad has had to look in the mirror and to really be honest with himself about what he’s feeling while his child’s here in the hospital. And if in that moment, we can let them know they’re not alone. We can give them the slightest boost of energy or confidence. What will that do? Not only to their experience, but to the experience of their families, to the experience of their child. Who’s the patient, these type of untimed, geographically placed touch points, I think are incredible. And it’s something almost every business the planet can do.

Dan Gingiss (20:48):
Well. Yeah, let’s be honest. Most of the men walking into that bathroom, probably our dads, I mean, it’s a children’s hospital. And so if we just kind of do the math, the, the hit, rate’s probably going to be pretty high, but I think that it plays on a couple of things. First of all, it plays on empathy, which we know is a hallmark to customer experience and, and, and being empathetic means understanding what somebody is going through in that moment. And yeah, your kids going in for surgery, you’re nervous, you’re scared, you’re worried. And you know, you might be alone or certainly you’re probably alone in the bathroom. And so it is that moment. And I think they’ve captured it perfectly. The other thing I really like is that we’ve talked a lot about how healthcare, especially in the United States is probably bottom of the barrel

Joey Coleman (21:34):
Horrible experiences, right. Fighting for last place with the cable companies.

Dan Gingiss (21:39):
Yeah. And so I love that it happened in a hospital that this was an experience that was designed in a healthcare space where frankly, we do not expect experiences like this. And so, you know, we talk a lot about it at customer expectations and the need to at least meet expectations and hopefully exceed them. I think the good news for the healthcare system and for hospitals is the expectations are probably pretty low, but this one soared over it and was probably more than anything surprising to Jere, right? Because you just, that’s not what somebody would expect walking into the bathroom, By the way, I do want to point out one other thing. This is the first time I think an experience this history, but you brought a bathroom story!

Joey Coleman (22:25):
Usually Dan has the bathroom stories, the bathroom experiences, no, this, this one, it absolutely stood out to me. And it, you know, to that point, Dan, I thought this is the kind of story that Dan’s going to be super excited about, which actually brings me to the second key point that I wanted to make about this story from Jerry. And that is this idea of creating interactions that get people talking. We all strive to do that as customer experience professionals, our hope is to create something that stands out in the crowd that gets people’s attention. And I know you heard Jere story in his own words earlier in the segment when we played that audio clip, but I’d like to share the rest of the social media posts that he made that originally got my attention. And I quote: “On the way out of the hospital today, I stopped to use the bathroom. And as I was washing my hands, I looked up and on the mirror was quote, hanging in there. Dad, it’s the third time I’ve experienced that mirror. And I appreciate it just the same this time as the other two, that’s the kind of CX thinking that really gets me excited.” I got to tell you, I have a hard time reading that passage without tearing, because I’m thinking of my friend, Jere who’s in this bathroom for the third surgery with his son, like, Oh my gosh, I can’t even begin to imagine the pain and the stress and the heartache and the angst. And he spoke to that earlier in the recording, but Holy cow, to have this moment where that’s released and here’s the kicker he’s been there before, he’s seen the message before and still it’s having that impact friends. To me, that’s how, you know, you’ve designed a powerful customer experience, touch point that when your customers experience it multiple times, it still gives them the emotional hit that it did the first time.

Dan Gingiss (24:33):
Yeah, Joey, this reminds me of something that actually my ex-wife and I termed the Dubrovnik Principle.

Joey Coleman (24:41):
The Dubrovnik Expeirence? Only, only you guys. I love it. I love it.

Dan Gingiss (24:47):
As our listeners who are a student geography know Dubrovnik is in Croatia. And we visited Dubrovnik on our honeymoon and had probably the perfect day in that lovely city and just absolutely it was such a memorable day. And about two years later, we went back to Croatia and we went back to Dubrovnik and we tried to replicate that day and it did it work. It just, we went to the same places, did the same things. We sat at the same cafe or did the same coffee. It just wasn’t the same. And we called that the Dubrovnik principle mostly because there, it actually comes up a lot in life, not just in travel that when you have an experience the second time, it’s great. It just isn’t as good as the first time, because the first time there’s the surprise element. And there’s, you know, I went, went to a really well-known restaurant in Chicago. That’s known for its experience and I had the most amazing experience. And then I brought somebody with me to go back and it wasn’t quite as good because I wasn’t experiencing it for the first time. And so I think the fact that he has gone through this three times, I loved also the words that he said, it’s the third time I’ve experienced that mirror. How many times has anybody experienced a mirror? Those words ever been said, and it’s three times and he’s still feeling it. So kudos to that hospital. Uh, amazing work.

Joey Coleman (26:14):
Yes. Children’s hospital. Great job. You consistently do a great job for your patients. And what I love about this is you’re now doing a great job for their families as well. Friends, what can we take away from this story? In every business, there are the opportunities to create poignant moments for your customers to create in it, to create an opportunity for empathy, to create an opportunity, to let them know that they are seen, that they are heard that they are appreciated. And if you do this right, and you consider some untimed, but geographically placed touchpoints you to have the opportunity to create the kind of interaction that will get your customers talking again, and again, and again.

Joey Coleman (27:02):
Almost everyone has interacted with chatbots, but all too often, it’s been a bad experience. In MythBusters – presented by Solvvy – we explore a common myth about CX chatbots and see how the right technology can create a positive experience, every time.

Joey Coleman (27:25):
Today’s myth about chatbots? All chatbots use artificial intelligence and machine learning. At this point, we all know the support chat bot, buzzwords, AI, machine learning, natural language, understanding and so on. When you are lucky enough to find a chat bot that actually uses artificial intelligence and machine learning, it should be able to quickly learn by crawling your content with some minor training from your team. It should be able to start delivering impactful results immediately. Now, almost every chatbot claims to use artificial intelligence and machine learning nowadays. But that isn’t actually the case.

Dan Gingiss (28:05):
You know, Joey, I also find that many, many companies put artificial intelligence and machine learning as if it’s one thing completely different than none of this. I promise. No, not one. We must do the other so many chat bots don’t have real artificial intelligence or machine learning and still require manual rule building in order to work effectively while we know that AI and natural language understanding is the go-to for next gen high-performing chat bots, there are plenty of unintelligent chatbots that force you to manually spell out the answer for every possible question a customer might ask. The wrong chat bot can require months of your team’s time to build and becomes extremely expensive, very quickly. Worst of all these types of old-school unintelligent chat bots, don’t learn and improve over time on their own.

Joey Coleman (28:55):
So what should you do if you’re evaluating different chat bot solutions, we’ll make sure you understand how much intelligence is truly powering the bot. Is there real machine learning and intelligence at work, or we need to monitor and update the bot constantly to ensure a great customer experience as a general rule, the smarter the bot, the less work you’ll need to do.

Dan Gingiss (29:17):
And the less work you need to do the more time you can devote to your other CX initiatives like getting those awesome bathroom mirror messages deployed!

Joey Coleman (29:26):
And that’s another myth busted. Thanks to our friends and podcast supporters at Salvi, the next gen chat bot find them at Solvvy.com – that’s S O L V V y.com.

Joey Coleman (29:43):
We spend hours and hours, nose deep in books. We believe that everything you read influences the experiences you create. So we’re happy to answer our favorite question. What are you reading?

Dan Gingiss (29:59):
You know, Joey, we talk all the time, but there is a question that I regularly ask you that I realized earlier today. I haven’t asked you in quite a long time.

Joey Coleman (30:08):
Well, interesting. Dan, there’s a couple of those questions. So I’m wondering which one you’re thinking about. I’m thinking about the question. What are you reading? Oh, I absolutely love this question. It’s one of my favorites to ask people as well. I love asking you this question. To answer your question in the last year, to be honest, I really upped my reading of fiction and also poetry. I’ve been trying to kind of disconnect from the world a little bit and try to have some escapism and enjoy. To be honest. I also have a bunch of great friends that are authors. So I get to read a ton of upcoming books before they’re released to the world, which to be honest is one of the best things about being friends with an author, you can read their books before you get them in the store. And one of these books was actually just released yesterday. And interestingly enough is about something that you and I have in common.

Dan Gingiss (31:02):
Let me guess it’s either about customer experience or Legos.

Joey Coleman (31:06):
No, not this time.

Dan Gingiss (31:09):
What about board games?

Joey Coleman (31:11):
I do indeed like board games, as I know you do as well, but no, this one’s different. It’s actually all about running your own business. Oh yes, we do share that in common too.

Dan Gingiss (31:22):
All right. I’m intrigued. I’m intrigued. I want to learn good things about running my business. Tell me some more.

Joey Coleman (31:28):
Well Dan, this book is called the self-employed life, business and personal development strategies that create sustainable success. And it’s written by our mutual friend, Jeffrey Shaw. Now Jeffrey is a leading voice for self-employed business owners and he’s the host of the top rated podcast, the self-employed life, which has heard in over 200 countries around the world. But instead of me telling you about the book, I think it’d be best to have Jeffrey explain the book in his own words. So I asked him if he’d just share a little bit about the book.

Jeffrey Shaw (31:59):
I’ve asked countless number of people, why they went into business for themselves, and everyone has some variation of the same answer they wanted to control their destiny or control their future, or maybe they wanted to control the hours they worked to, which I reply. How’s that going for you? And everybody laughs because everybody realizes that while they intended on controlling their destiny and their future and their hours they’re entering what feels like almost completely uncontrollable circumstances, uh, economies go up and down, markets, change trends, come and go. And now we know there can be the occasional pandemic. So while the circumstances of being self-employed may seem completely uncontrollable. The one thing I’ve learned that you can control is that you can create the environment for the results you want. In fact, it’s the only thing that we can really control is the environment for the results we want. And that’s why in the self-employed life, I teach a strategy that I refer to as the self-employed ecosystem, the self-employed ecosystem consisting of three main elements, personal development, to expand the capacity of what you’re capable of and what you welcome. The second element is business strategies that are right sized for a small business. And the third element is daily habits that create consistency and sustainable success. And just like an ecosystem in nature of any one of those elements is off. It can throw off the entire system. And that’s why when you’re self-employed the old adage businesses business, don’t take it personal. Doesn’t apply because your level of success is contingent on your level of capacity and personal development. And that’s why the self-employed ecosystem is essential.

Joey Coleman (33:54):
Now this book is filled with great information for any business owner. Dan, there are a ton of books out there about being a business owner. But what I love about this one is it covers three key things that normally you would find in different books, but in Jeffrey’s book, they’re all in one. And those three key things are personal development, business strategies and daily habits. And what I love is he breaks down each one to talk about how important personal development is and how important daily habits are, especially given that most business books are just about the business strategies.

Dan Gingiss (34:30):
Ah, well, you know, those are, those are three good things I have to tell you. The one that really sticks out to me is the daily habits, because these are so hard to develop and I have been working on them. You and I were just talking about calendaring habits right before we went on air and you know, just trying to focus every day. It’s like, it’s a beautiful thing to work for yourself because you know, you have the best handsomest boss there is in the world. But then the other thing is, is you don’t have that person looking over your shoulder, giving you deadlines. And so the daily habit thing, I think to me anyway, is the part, like I turned the page right there. Cause I, I got to get better at that.

Joey Coleman (35:09):
Yeah. And I will tell you one of Jeffrey’s daily habits that he recommends that I love and I wasn’t doing before I read this book and now I am, he doesn’t have a to-do list. He has a to don’t list. He has a list of things that any times he finds himself doing these things, he cry, he stops doing it and gets back to the things he should be doing.

Dan Gingiss (35:30):
Like checking Twitter or Facebook…

Joey Coleman (35:33):
I wasn’t going to get specific.

Dan Gingiss (35:38):
Clubhouse?

Joey Coleman (35:38):
could be something to think about when we think about our favorite passages, you know, one of the things I wanted to do and I always love doing is asking authors, what’s your favorite part of the book? You know, it’s something we do in our book reports and knowing that I wanted to talk about this book that we were reading as well. I figured we, I would ask Jeffrey to, so here’s Jeffrey’s favorite passage from his book, the self-employed life.

Jeffrey Shaw (36:05):
What I didn’t realize at the time was that my simple egg business at 14 years old would be the beginning of a lifetime of being self-employed. Remember when I said I had butterflies in my stomach heading out on Saturday mornings, it’s because I was scared to death. I suffered from terrible shyness. As a kid, I would take profits from my egg business and buy self-help books by Wayne Dwyer and hide them in my house because my family would think I was weird. If they knew at one point, I even bought a book on self hypnosis to hypnotize myself out of shyness. I learned how to visualize myself in a power pose among a crowd of people. The first time I tried my power pose, it didn’t go so well. I was hanging out with a few neighborhood kids, which was already really unusual for me because normally I was locked in a room somewhere reading about how to think and grow rich. But on this day I thought I would try out my power pose while it may have felt powerful to me, the expression I received told me, I looked more like a cross between, I don’t know, Superman and a root Paul. One kid looked at me up and down and said, what the hell is wrong with you? That was the end of my hypnosis techniques. So going house to house and knocking on doors was a huge stretch for me. It wasn’t just out of my comfort zone because I would felt shy. The truth was I didn’t have a comfort zone at all. So why do it then why do any of us put ourselves through what we do as self-employed business owners? We know it’s not the easy way. I believe that whether or not we realize it in the beginning, what motivates us most is the desire to become bolder versions of ourselves that is deepening and developing into the best versions of ourselves as bigger than any fear, challenge or obstacle that we might face.

Dan Gingiss (38:00):
Super cool, great stories. And, uh, really can tell that this is going to be, this is going to have some interesting stuff in it that I probably haven’t considered before. Joey, do you have a favorite passage as well?

Joey Coleman (38:13):
You know, I do. And while mine doesn’t include references to Superman and RuPaul like that last one did, um, I think you might like this one, Dan, it probably comes as no surprise to you that my favorite passage in the book has to do with customer experience.

Dan Gingiss (38:26):
No!

Joey Coleman (38:27):
Shocker. I know. Right. All right. So, and I quote, we also know that in life, timing is often everything. Now see that it’s not just what you say or even how you say it, but also when you say it, the journey on which you take visitors, whether it’s prospective customers on your website, readers of your blog or listeners to your podcast is a blend of consumer behavior psychology and the subtleties of your audience. For example, typical consumer behavior will say that people need to see their problem before they seek a solution as a general rule. I would say that is true. However, the nuance is how do you point out the problems so that your audience responds well? Is it the usual pointing out their pain approach or is it a more aspirational helping them imagine what is possible if their pain point is solved more than in the past? I think many people prefer an aspirational message. So this idea of knowing the emotional journey your audience needs to go on in order to buy into your offer means understanding them on a whole new level.

Dan Gingiss (39:29):
I see why you picked this one out. I would actually argue, this is more of a marketing thing than a CX thing, but it does also show how the customer experience starts with the marketing. And then if we can figure out how to make an emotional connection with a prospect, by focusing, for example, on the aspirational, then we’re starting that experience off, right. And we’re getting them to buy from us. We’re setting that expectation. So I think that is a fascinating quote as well. Uh, you know, that I love the intersection of CX and marketing, and I think that very much pinpoints it.

Dan Gingiss (40:03):
I agree my friend. So here’s the deal. If you’re self-employed, I think you’ll love this book. If you’ve thought about starting your own business, or if you have a side hustle that is working its way into a business, I think you’ll love this book. In fact, if you’re all inspired about this book, the way I am, here’s what you can do. You can of course order the book or you can be one of the first 10 people to message us via the Contact Page ExperienceThisShow.com. And we will happily send you a signed copy from Jeffrey as our way of saying thank you for listening to experience this. And we wish you well on your self-employed journey.

Joey Coleman (40:43):
Thanks for joining us for another episode of experience. This, you are the best listener ever!

Dan Gingiss (40:49):
And since you listened to the whole show, yay, you were curious, was there a specific part of this episode that you enjoyed the most? If so, it would mean the world to us. If you could share it with a coworker, a friend or someone that just loves listening to podcasts.

Joey Coleman (41:03):
And while you’re in the sharing mood, if you felt inclined to jump over to iTunes or wherever you find your podcasts and write us a review, we would so appreciate it. And when you do, don’t forget to let us know as we might have a little surprise for you.

Dan Gingiss (41:19):
Thanks again for your time. And we’ll see you next week for more.

Joey Coleman (41:22):
Experience.

Dan Gingiss (41:22):
This!