Episode 130 – Innovation Leads to Better Access, Better Opportunities, and Better Laughs

Join us as we discuss making your website available to ALL customers, focusing on the little things to bring out creativity, and a restaurant known for its – Instagram page?!

Accessing, Innovating, and Signing – Oh My!

Referenced in the Show

• Accessibe
• Big Little Breakthroughs: How Small, Everyday Innovations Drive Oversized Results – by Josh Linkner
• Instagram for El Arroyo Restaurant in Austin, Texas

Host Contact Information

Email Dan: Dan@dangingiss.com

Tweet Dan Gingiss: @DGingiss

Email Joey: JoeyC@JoeyColeman.com

DanGingiss.com

JoeyColeman.com

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Episode Transcript

Download a machine-transcribed, barely edited transcript of Episode 130 here or read it below:
(if anything doesn’t make sense or you have any questions about the transcript – just Contact us!)

Joey Coleman (00:05):
Welcome to Experience This!

Dan Gingiss (00:07):
The podcast that celebrates remarkable customer experiences and inspires you to stand out from the competition by wowing your customers.

Joey Coleman (00:17):
Each episode, we bring you a healthy dose of inspiring stories, funny interactions, and practical takeaways. Marketing and customer experience thought leader, Dan Gingiss.

Dan Gingiss (00:30):
shares the mic with customer retention and employee experience expert, Joey Coleman, helping you to get people talking about your business.

Joey Coleman (00:40):
So get ready because it’s time to Experience This!

Dan Gingiss (00:48):
Get ready for another episode of the Experience This! Show!

Joey Coleman (00:54):
Join us as we discuss: making your website available to all customers, focusing on the little things to bring out creativity, and a restaurant known for its Instagram page?!

Dan Gingiss (01:08):
Accessing, Innovating, and Signing – oh my!

Joey Coleman (01:12):
Sometimes a remarkable experience deserves deeper investigation. We dive into the nitty gritty of customer interactions and dissect how, and why, they happen. Join us while we’re Dissecting the Experience.

Dan Gingiss (01:33):
When I was a head of digital customer experience at discover card, I learned a lot about website accessibility. Now this is the process of making a website accessible by people with various disabilities, including blindness deafness, physical disabilities, or even sensory issues. It was a significant challenge because it required a lot of resources, including people who were intimately knowledgeable with the requirements that are both from the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and something called WCAG, the web content accessibility guidelines. We also had to have people who could test the coding to ensure that it worked on accessories like screen readers. Have you ever worked with a screen reader, Joey?

Joey Coleman (02:18):
You know, Dan and I have, I at least are. I would say I’ve seen one in action and a screen reader is pretty much what it sounds like for those of you that haven’t seen a screen reader. It reads the text, that’s on a screen to the user, but not every website follows a linear path from top to bottom. So it can take some careful work to make sure that the reading is actually accurate.

Dan Gingiss (02:39):
Exactly. If it bounces around the page, it can be really confusing to somebody who is not able to read it. So anyway, I was introduced by a client of mine, to a company called Accessibe – which essentially takes all of the manual work out of coding for accessibility, and instead uses artificial intelligence and literally just a couple of lines of code to make an entire website completely accessible. Now, I’m really excited that we have recording here from Michael Hingson – the chief vision officer for Accessibe. Michael, who is blind, was a user of Accessibe’s technology before he went on to work for the company. Let’s hear from him now,

Michael Hingson (03:22):
Hi, I’m Michael Hingson chief vision officer for accessibility. I first really became aware of and had some interactions with the concept of artificial intelligence. When I was working in the mid 1970s with the national Federation of the blind and Dr. Ray Kurzweil to develop and market the Kurzweil reading machine for the blind, that was a machine that literally could read any printed page and convert what it read to voice. What was interesting about the machine was that the more you read of a document or the more you use the machine, the better it became at reading documents, it actually learned. And that was the AI part. Over the years, I’ve kept up with artificial intelligence and recognize its value and the visionaries who are bringing it into our world. In October of last year, I had occasion to go to a website that had this new program I had never heard of before called Accessibe on it. And what the systems told me when I went to the website, my screen reader, the software I use to understand what is on a website. The screen reader said, put your website browser in screen reader mode by pressing all at one that was intriguing to me. I visited this website many times before, found it to be a little bit too hard to use efficiently, like a lot of websites that were not accessible. But when I pressed all one, suddenly this website became very accessible to me. I was intrigued and began to look into where’d this come from. And I discovered that there was this company called Accessibe that actually created a system that would make websites a lot more usable and functional than they otherwise might have been. And that they weren’t doing it through manual coding, but rather using the whole concept of artificial intelligence to analyze the content of a website and create something that’s called an overlay that would actually interact with my web browser and the web browsers of other persons with disabilities and do things that were necessary to make those websites usable for all of us, for blind people with screen readers, it enhanced the, the whole issue of being able to read menus even to the point of analyzing images within menus and within websites, menus definitely became easier. Shopping carts became easier to use on websites with accessible tables were much more usable. In general, the websites became more accessible because of artificial intelligence. I started investigating the company and found this is a pretty fascinating thing. And as I did more investigating and reached out to the company, suddenly I found myself earlier this year being offered the position of chief vision officer person to help really bring Accessibe into the marketplace of consumers in not only the United States, but the world. And here we are today. The fact of the matter is Accessibe works. It truly makes websites a lot more functional than they otherwise might have been. And the neat thing about Accessibe is it’s very scalable, very easily with just a few lines of coding, one or two, you can take most websites and greatly enhance their usability by me as a blind person and other persons with disabilities. That is really wonderful. Artificial intelligence is with us. It’s going to be with us. And it definitely enhances our lives in so many ways. And for me and other persons with disabilities, Accessibe is a great example of that.

Joey Coleman (07:05):
Wow, that is so cool. Dan, you know, I’ve actually had the opportunity to hear Dr. Kurzweil speak on several occasions and he talks about the Kurzweil reading machine that he created. So it’s interesting to hear kind of the rest of the story and how that actually gets used out in the world. You know, we’ve talked several times on this show about businesses that are purposefully accessible, like it’s part of their drive and their mission. And I’m reminded of our story about Pizzability.

Dan Gingiss (07:32):
Oh, you mean season four, episode 82. Y.

Joey Coleman (07:35):
Yes. I was not sure what season or episode that was, but yes, you are correct. Pizza ability is the pizza restaurant in Denver, Colorado that specifically caters to people with a variety of challenges, uh, sensory deprivation challenges, you know, blindness, uh, a variety of different things. And they also hire folks that also are dealing with a variety of challenges to be part on their staff. And then there’s the Starbucks that’s right near Gallaudet university in Washington, DC.

Dan Gingiss (08:02):
And we talked about them in season two, episode 42.

Joey Coleman (08:06):
Okay. This is getting a little scary rain, man. I mean, Dan, I was going to say, I got skills when it comes to naming episodes, you do have a great episode reference abilities. But anyway, those are some examples of the entire experience being predicated on there. Being customers who are facing a variety of challenges or might have a variety of disabilities. And I want to note that we’re using the word disabilities here in the same spirit that Michael used in his earlier segment that we shared. But what makes this so interesting is that it takes businesses or at least their websites that are not predicated on accessibility and instantly makes them accessible. I’ll bet. You wish you had something like this when you were at Discover don’t you Dan?

Dan Gingiss (08:54):
You bet I do. I’m not joking. When I say it would have literally saved hundreds of hours of coding time, maybe thousands of hours. So how does this product work? Well, you know, a website has accessibly installed when there is a blue circle with a white human outline in the center of it at the bottom right-hand corner of the screen. And if you click on that circle, the first screen that comes up says, choose the right accessibility profile for you. So examples of accessibility profiles include a seizure safe profile, which eliminates flashes and reduces color a vision impaired profile, which enhances the website’s visuals, a cognitive disability profile, an ADHD friendly profile, a screen reader profile for blind users and even a keyboard navigation profile for those that have motor challenges. There’s also content adjustments. So there’s a text magnifier. You can change the letter, spacing there’s color adjustments. One of the things, one of the challenges that we had at discover was that the brand color of orange was very difficult for color blind people to see. So we had to use a darker color orange than our typical brand color in order to meet the specifications and to be viewable by everyone. And it also has orientation adjustments. Like if you want to stop animations, or if you want to mute sounds et cetera. And so I thought this was so cool because it not only saves as I said, these hundreds of hours of coding time, but it also literally makes the site instantly accessible for anyone. And it also doesn’t disturb people who don’t want these features. And I think that’s, what’s so neat about it is that it is totally customizable. One more thing, I’m going to say, Joey, and then I really want to hear your, your reaction is my feeling on, on making a website accessible. Even when I did have to spend hundreds or thousands of, of coding hours, was that generally speaking, an accessible website is a better experience for even the people that don’t need it to be accessible. So I’ll give you an example when you increase the font size, because maybe you have older customers that can’t squint and read a smaller font, it actually makes it more easily readable for everybody, not just older, shorter, right? And so a lot of the changes that you end up having to make, make the experience just cleaner and smoother for everyone involved. Yeah.

Joey Coleman (11:30):
I am absolutely fascinated by this. You know, there was a period of my life where I actually built websites. It’s a long story, but let’s just say, uh, when I was in college, I convinced the computer science program to create an independent study class for eight credit hours where I would teach myself how to code in HTML. And if I built a website, I would get an a, let’s just say eight credits of AA were very useful to my GPA, but having built dozens, if not hundreds, we’re probably North of hundreds at this point of websites for clients and customers. When I had my ad agency, what’s interesting here is you’re right. These are incredibly complex things to factor in. And with all due respect to folks who have a variety of different challenges, when living in kind of the website world, or trying to interact with a website to your point, there are literally dozens of things, if not hundreds of things that you should be taking into consideration for these and some of them counteract with each other, right? So if you’re changing the color for one thing, you’re maybe causing problems in another side. And if you’re, you know, magnifying the text here, maybe you’re creating too much distraction for the people with ADHD. And so there’s a lot of pieces of this puzzle. What I love about this service. And I got to tell you, while you were talking about it while we’re recording, this is true confession time friends. I actually went on the website for Accessibe because I was thinking, which is just Accessibe.com, A C C E S S I B E.com. And I immediately clicked over to their pricing because I thought to myself, I know for a fact, I’ve spent tens of thousands of dollars on coders solving these problems, their standard package for websites under a thousand unique pages, which let’s be candid is probably most organizations. Websites is $490 a year. This, at the time we’re recording this, this is a no-brainer. I can’t believe how complex and comprehensive this offering is yet how inexpensive it is. And it sounds like easy to just install the code on your site. And you’re good to go.

Dan Gingiss (13:32):
I know. And that’s why I love this as well, because it is literally plug and play and it transforms the site into being usable for anyone and everyone. So what’s the takeaway here. First of all, it is not only the law in the United States, but also the right thing to do to make your website accessible to all customers. I mean, after all, we don’t want to turn down anybody who wants to pay us money, right? And so if, if somebody wants to come to our website, we should make sure that it is available for them. But I think this was also, this takes it a step further by a really taking a look at all of the different challenges that people may have while surfing a website and be making it so much easier for companies to install this. And, you know, we didn’t talk a lot about the artificial intelligence part, but that’s really helping in terms of how it adjusts on the fly. If you say, okay, I want the no seizure mode. It, it looks at your website and adjusts it on the fly using AI. It’s really intelligent and really, really impressive. So definitely check out excessively and let’s just keep in mind folks it’s important in every aspect of our business to make sure that we too are accessible for all of our kids.

Joey Coleman (14:58):
We’re excited to give you an overview of an important book you should know about as well as share some of our favorite passages as part of our next Book Report.

Dan Gingiss (15:11):
This week’s book report is by Josh Linkner, he’s an innovation keynote speaker at two time, New York Times bestselling author, and actually was a jazz guitarist before he got into the speaking business. And I know we both know him or have interacted with him. Joey shared the stage as they say in the speaking world.

Joey Coleman (15:30):
Yeah. I had the chance to speak at an event where I got to see Josh talk. Fantastic job, super excited for this book.

Dan Gingiss (15:38):
Yeah. So his newest book is called Big Little Breakthroughs: How small everyday innovations drive oversized results. And it actually just released last week. So literally hot off the presses. Would you even say innovative?

Joey Coleman (15:54):
It is in that regard. Indeed.

Dan Gingiss (15:56):
I couldn’t resist. I’m sorry. Let’s go straight to Mr. Linkner for an overview of the book, Josh.

Josh Linkner (16:04):
Hey Dan, my new book is called big little breakthroughs, how small everyday innovations drive oversized results. And the whole thing is helping everyday people become everyday innovators. You know, the pressure to generate big ideas can feel overwhelming. We know that bold innovations are critical in these disruptive and competitive times, but when it comes to breakthrough thinking, we often present instead of shooting for a $10 billion IPO or a Nobel prize, the best innovators focus instead on big little breakthroughs, small creative acts that unlock massive rewards over time by building a daily habit of creativity, organizations and individuals not only enjoy a high volume of small wins, but the daily practice of micro innovations is the fastest route to discover the massive breakthroughs that all of us seek big little breakthroughs. Isn’t just for propeller head investors, fancy pants, CEOs, or hoodie wearing tech billionaires. Rather. It’s a simple, yet effective method for all of us to cultivate the power of human creativity, focusing on a deliberate approach to daily practice. The system enables people from all backgrounds, training and walks of life to expand their creative skillset and mindset. It essentially helps everyday people and leaders unlock inventive thinking, and they’re able to harness innovation to tackle their toughest challenges and seize their biggest opportunities. Really. It flips the whole premise of innovation upside down, making it accessible and within the grasp of every one of us. And so again, it’s a specific and practical framework on dormant creative capacity and it’s way less risky. It’s less expensive. And it’s within the grasp of each of us to unlock giant results. Over time thing is when we get creative, we can really attack any of the things that we care about the most in life, from our business performance, to our health, to our family and community, even our environment and our educational outcomes. So I really hope that dig a little breakthroughs once again, helps everyday people become everyday innovators.

Dan Gingiss (18:06):
I was really drawn to this book because I talk a lot with clients about focusing on the little things in customer experience and how those little things add up. And I know, you know, this story, Joey, but when I was at discover and I was leading digital customer experience, one of my big success stories. In fact, probably one of the proudest moments of my career was when discover won the JD Power award for customer satisfaction. Your friends at Amex had won it all seven years of this existence. Discover had come in second, all seven years of the existence. And when we finally won it and the 40% of that score came from the website. So I had a pretty big role in this. And, and obviously we did some innovating to do some really cool new things on the website. We also focused a ton on all of the little death by a thousand paper cuts barriers that we were putting in front of customers and we fixed them all. I mean, literally I remember a project that I submitted to it that had a hundred fixes in it. None of them were more than a line or two of code, but when you added them all up, it really made a difference to the experience. So I loved this concept that that can be applied to creativity and innovation as well. That look, we don’t have to cure cancer. That would be awesome if we could, but we can start a little bit smaller than that.

Joey Coleman (19:28):
You know, Dan, I couldn’t agree more. And that was the piece of this that intrigued me. I think so many organizations throw away around words like innovation and creativity. And there are these kind of big amorphous ideas that most employees, most team members struggle to see the practical application. And what I love about Joshua’s book is he talks about the little things, the little innovative moments, the little aspects of creativity that lead to bigger things. You know, it’s really all about kind of spinning up into a culture of creativity, a culture of innovation. And it happens with these little types of moves. You know, interestingly enough, something I’ve been trying to do in the pandemic is because I’m finding myself with a little more time. I’m trying to read more science fiction. And the reason I’m reading more science fiction is to try to get my brain thinking in more creative, innovative ways, making connections that wouldn’t normally make reading business books. One example of like a small little thing I’ve been trying to do to spur that creativity. So let’s go ahead and on that spirit of little creative things you can do, that sets us up nicely for Josh’s favorite passage. So here’s the author – Josh Linkner – sharing his favorite passage from new book

Josh Linkner (20:48):
As the hurried shopkeeper navigated the crowded London sidewalk. His right hand had begun the habitual sequence of flicking his nearly finished cigarette butt onto the cobblestone street. But just before launching the smoldering projectile, a bright yellow object caught his eye clenching his fascinating cigarette. He was drawn to the edge of the sidewalk on builder’s street to discover a glowing yellow container mounted at eye level on an aluminum post in large black letters on the lemon yellow box, a question was posed. Who’s your favorite superhero, Batman or Superman to vote his allegiance to the man of steel, the storekeeper inserted his cigarette butt into the small opening under his hero’s name. He watched his nicotine stain filter fall onto the receptacle behind the glass front and land on top amount of others piling I on one side of the bin, realizing that his hero was in fact in the lead over the caped Crusader, a nearly undetectable smile Rose in the corner of his tightly closed jaw. The merchant rushed off to open his store, barely realizing that he’d broken his morning routine of littering in the crowded streets while each bud is less than an inch long cigarette remnants are the single biggest litter problem in the UK in central London alone, the annual cost to clean up and properly dispose of cigarette butts is over $1.4 million worldwide, worldwide, and estimated 4.5 billion cigarette butts are thrown on the ground each year, releasing harmful toxins and creating a serious hazard for children or wildlife that may ingest them. They are the largest source of Marine litter, outranking, both plastic straws and plastic bags enter Trevon restaurant and environmental activist who used his creativity to help the planet with a dry British wit. He reminds me of a slightly disheveled James Bond who traded in his overprice tuxedo for a pair of faded jeans. He’s the kind of guy you would love to spend a couple hours with in a neighborhood pub savoring his stories as much as the cold pints and warm chips, or as Londoners prefer warm bites and cold chips. He’s neither world famous inventor nor and artistic luminary TRO. And in fact is one of us just like you and me staring down the cigarette litter problem with the intensity of a pistol duel. He knew the problem could be solved, lacking in aristocratic trust fund or benevolent benefactor, trow, and tap into the universal resource that we all share. The great equalizer of human creativity is invention the ballot, bend challenged people to vote with their butts.

Dan Gingiss (23:23):
Oh, such a cool story. I mean, it’s got Batman, Superman, and James Bond in it. So you can’t yeah, you can’t lose. And one of the things I love about this book is that Linkner storytelling is amazing and he really takes you on a journey with him through these stories. Now, speaking of journeys, as we just were Joey, I want to share my favorite passage, which happens to be about a little green frog that took quite a journey back in the 1980s. And I’m talking of course about Frogger from chapter three, the Frogger principle here comes my favorite passage, the frog and Frogger couldn’t rest on his successes for more than a millisecond. He had to keep hopping ahead in order to survive his hostile environment. The quest for forward progress in the midst of in imminent danger is what made the Atari games so compelling, navigating chaos in order to reach a new destination. Frogger contributed to my embarrassing low report card marks in sixth grade, but I learned far more from Frogger than doing long division and Mrs. Morrison’s math class. If you really think about it, we are all playing a giant three-dimensional game of Frogger. Our successes aren’t permanent, but rather a temporary state in the context of unprecedented change and increasingly difficult circumstances. That fleeting moment of success is the equivalent of our Kermit-esque buddy landing on the back of a turtle. It simply can’t be savored indefinitely. Instead we must leap from one success to the next to the next, unless we’re prepared to be swept into the Rapids standing still doesn’t only kill frogs, the comfort and satisfaction of a successful leap, lures, too many smart people into thinking they don’t need to keep on hopping.

Joey Coleman (25:13):
Ooh, that’s sweet. It’s just like poetry don’t need to keep on hopping. I like it. You know, I too was a fan of Froggart. There were probably some other video games that I played more than Frogger, but I like this idea of not only keeping moving and keeping the innovation going in the small hops, leading to big things over time. But I just liked the way that Josh writes, you know, it’s compelling prose that you don’t normally find in a business book, which actually is why I selected the following passage as my favorite passage. Now, this comes from part two of the book, which is called the eight obsessions of everyday innovators and obsession. Number one is fall in love with the problem. And I quote, as his frustrations boiled over Chad price reached the breaking point. His legs were numb from sitting in the warm plastic seat for nearly two hours. Yet there were still 16 people ahead of him on the list. The pale fluorescent lighting was making his eyes water amidst, the angry ups of other customers, impatiently waiting their turns to Rose over the four year old was having yet a, another temper tantrum while the large man who is left sloppily gobbled down a ham and cheese sandwich from the blistering stale air to the lingering smell of overheating, photocopy machines, the soul sucking experience was all he could take. We’ve all had the painful experience of waiting at the dreaded department of motor vehicles consistently ranked as the number one worst customer experience in endless hall of shame reports, even ahead of budget airlines and cable companies, most of us would rather get a root canal than to have to suffer through a visit to the DMV. And Dan, guess what? The story goes on to tell how Chad, are you ready for this decided to open his own DMV, making customer experience a competitive differentiator.

Dan Gingiss (27:05):
Wowzers his own DMV. Like just what I’ve always wanted. I loved that. I loved that story too. And, and, you know, he goes on to detail that literally he was getting people to come from three, four counties over to his DMV because they heard about what a great experience it was. And it just goes to show you, if you can make an, a great experience out of a DMV, you can make a great experience out of your business. No excuse if you’re like, Oh, but you don’t understand Joey and Dan, our industry, it’s not creative. It’s not interesting. We have so much difficulty selling these widgets in a B2B environment, blah, blah, blah. No, if the MV can do it, you can do it too. Absolutely. And I think a lot of B2B companies can be more exciting than they are. There is no law that says that you have to be boring.

Joey Coleman (27:59):
Please stop accepting that B2B equals permission to be boring. It doesn’t exactly. Exactly. So, Hey, everyone pick up a copy of big little breakthroughs, how small everyday innovations drive oversized results by Josh Linkner and start thinking creatively about how the little things can really add up to big change.

Joey Coleman (28:23):
Almost everyone has interacted with chatbots, but all too often, it’s been a bad experience. In MythBusters – presented by Solvvy – we explore a common myth about CX chatbots and see how the right technology can create a positive experience every time.

Dan Gingiss (28:46):
Today’s myth about chatbots? They don’t keep customer information safe. I think you’ll agree, Joey, that your company and customer data is not only sensitive information. It’s absolutely sacred and they’re trusting you with it. So you might be concerned that putting a chat bot on your website or in your app could potentially expose your users to some level of privacy risk. Is a chat bot and a track and store customer data and not to be paranoid here, but his big brother watching.

Joey Coleman (29:17):
Well, the reality is that the top chat bot platforms are highly secure, but make sure you do your homework because there are some real pretenders out there. Now, in most cases, chat-bots should not require access to personally identifiable information (PII) to provide immediate answers or support for customer questions in cases where information is being accessed or stored in a client dashboard instance, your chat bot platform needs the right security policies, procedures, and safeguards to protect and secure that data. The best chat bot platforms already have the proper security certifications and can redact sensitive information where needed to add another layer of privacy. In other words, the right chat bot platform should have everything you need already in place. So that privacy and security concerns won’t keep you up at night.

Joey Coleman (30:09):
That sounds like a big little breakthrough in chat bot technology. See what I did there? It’s good to know. It’s good to know that at least some of the chat bots out there have made this a high priority.

Joey Coleman (30:21):
And that’s another myth busted thanks to our friends and podcast supporters at Solvvy – the Next Gen chatbot. Learn more about the fantastic folks at Solvvy on their website. Solvvy – S O L V V y.com

Joey Coleman (30:39):
Just because you have required elements of your business doesn’t mean they need to be, Oh, it’s time to get creative, have some fun and make people sit up and take notice. Get your customers talking when you Make the Required Remarkable.

Dan Gingiss (30:56):
Ah, Instagram… The perfect photos with just the right filters, a picture that’s worth a thousand words and at least a dozen hashtags, where are we? Where are we tell our stories? And we feel the pressure to look good all the time. I want to introduce you to a restaurant called El Arroyo. It’s a Tex Mex restaurant in Austin, Texas. Now they serve tacos, burritos, fajitas, and other Mexican fare. But what they’re actually known for is their letter board sign outside of the restaurant. Wait a second. They’re known most for the letter board sign that you see before you even sampled the food. Yeah. And actually, if you go onto Yelp, their average is about 2.5 stars.

Joey Coleman (31:47):
It’s not the greatest reputation in terms of the reviews.

Dan Gingiss (31:51):
And what’s fascinating is almost all the reviews. People either love it or hate it. It is a, it’s like five stars or one star.

Joey Coleman (31:57):
That’s great. That’s what you want. You don’t want people to love you or hate you.

Dan Gingiss (32:01):
I guess. I mean, it definitely appeals to certain people. Now we’re going to go over some of these signs in a second. And again, just so you know what I mean, a letter board sign is one of those lit up signs outside where someone’s literally taking the letters and placing them on one at a time. And you know, they have some funny ones, some snarky ones, what have you, they even have a gift shop full of memorabilia from their signs. So they have an ornament that you can get. They have a poop jokes, toilet paper, they have hand sanitizer with one of their signs on it, candle that you can get. So this is really become their thing. And I want explain before we get into the science, why this is a required remarkable segment. And it’s because a lot of companies feel that social media is a required part of the business. And in many ways it is we, we should be present for our customers, but it doesn’t mean that we have to talk about our products all the time or that we have to try to sell people on stuff. And one of the neatest things about the El Arroyo Instagram page, which by the way, if you want to find it, it is L Aroyo that’s for those that don’t spell Spanish. It’s E L A R R O Y O underscore a T X, which is Austin, Texas. Uh, what’s so interesting is there’s nothing on the Instagram page about their phone. It’s all about signs, right? And by the way, they have 423,000 followers on Instagram. That’s a few more than I have more than me. Yeah. For a restaurant, a Tex Mex restaurant in Austin, Hey, let’s get to the site. Let’s get into some of these.

Joey Coleman (33:43):
These are great. So I got to say there’s one here that I absolutely loved. And it made me, you know, it’s rare when you’re on Instagram to laugh out loud. This is one that I saw it and I just started laughing out loud. Okay. Here’s what it says. “If you say gullible really slow, it sounds like orange.”

Dan Gingiss (34:01):
Wait… Seriously?

Joey Coleman (34:02):
Not at all, but everyone who hears that is going to go “guillable.”

Dan Gingiss (34:11):
I love it. I was one, remember it’s a text next place. It says, what if you pronounced female like tamale, would that be spelled the same? Right? Same. They’ve got the same last four letters. Funky English language.

Joey Coleman (34:29):
Yeah. I love it. You know, there’s also this, you know, talk about news jacking or taking a story that’s in the news and putting it into your branding. I thought this one was good. We really missed the boat on our Suez canal joke.

Dan Gingiss (34:44):
Yes. Yes. One that I particularly thought was memorable. Cause you know, I love bathroom. Humor is a, if you see a toilet in your dream do not use it. It’s pretty good advice. So good.

Joey Coleman (34:57):
And then occasionally they do put things that are semi relevant to the restaurant, right? So one that says nachos are just tacos that don’t have their life together.

Dan Gingiss (35:10):
Exactly. Or I’m just doing my part to conserve water by drinking Margarita’s. Nice. I mean, these go on and on this Instagram page goes on forever and almost all of these. I just, I mean, I just love them. There’s like, there’s no bad ones in there. And so what can we learn from this? Well, first of all, you’ve heard me say on this show and elsewhere many times that I love signage because I think signs, especially outside of a place of business are really the first piece of communication that you’re going to see. It it’s like the experience before the experience. Right? And there is no reason. As we said in the last segment, there is no reason or no law that says your sign has to be boring. And in fact, when your sign is interesting and entertaining, it gets people to stop and come in. Now, what if you don’t have a physical location, that’s okay. You might have a website or a mobile app or some other form of communication in which you can have some fun. And I believe, and we’ve talked about this on the show too, that this extends to every piece of communication, contracts, invoices, welcome letters. Thank you, notes, whatever it is, we can have some fun and show some personality and become the El Arroyo of our business.

Joey Coleman (36:33):
Thanks for joining us for another episode of Experience This! You are the best listener ever!

Dan Gingiss (36:39):
And since you listened to the whole show…

Joey Coleman (36:41):
Yay, you!

Dan Gingiss (36:43):
We’re curious, was there a specific part of this episode that you enjoyed the most? If so, it would mean the world to us if you could share it with a coworker, a friend, or someone that just loves listening to podcasts.

Joey Coleman (36:53):
And while you’re in the sharing mood, if you felt inclined to jump over to iTunes or wherever you find your podcasts and write us a review, we would so appreciate it. And when you do, don’t forget to let us know as we might have a little surprise for you.

Dan Gingiss (37:09):
Thanks again for your time. And we’ll see you next week for more.

Joey Coleman (37:11):
Experience!

Dan Gingiss (37:11):
This!