Episode 129 – Video Energizing or Video Fatigue?

Join us as we discuss enticing your customers to come back after COVID, videos that capture your brand spirit, and managing camera fatigue in a video-based business environment.

Flying, Speedriding, and Zooming – Oh My!

Referenced in the Show

• Delta Airlines Entices Flyers with Enhanced Rewards

• MUST WATCH: Speedriding Through An Alpine Resort – From Avoriaz With Love – by Red Bull

• Citi Creates ‘Zoom-Free Fridays’ to Combat Pandemic Fatigue – by Anna Schaverien in the New York Times

Host Contact Information

Email Dan: Dan@dangingiss.com

Tweet Dan Gingiss: @DGingiss

Email Joey: JoeyC@JoeyColeman.com

DanGingiss.com

JoeyColeman.com

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Episode Transcript

Download an unedited transcript of Episode 129 here or read it below:

Joey Coleman (00:05):
Welcome to Experience This!

Dan Gingiss (00:08):
The podcast that celebrates remarkable customer experiences and inspires you to stand out from the competition by wowing your customers.

Joey Coleman (00:17):
Each episode, we bring you a healthy dose of inspiring stories, funny interactions, and practical takeaways, marketing and customer experience thought leader, Dan Gingiss…

Dan Gingiss (00:30):
shares the mic with customer retention and employee experience expert, Joey Coleman, helping you to get people talking about your business.

Joey Coleman (00:40):
So get ready because it’s time to Experience This!

Joey Coleman (00:48):
Get ready, for another episode of the Experience This Show.

Dan Gingiss (00:53):
Join us as we discuss enticing your customers to come back after COVID videos that capture your brand spirit and managing camera fatigue in a video-based business environment.

Joey Coleman (01:08):
Flying, Speedriding, and Zooming – oh my!

Joey Coleman (01:15):
With a pandemic sweeping the globe, and shifting the way organizations interact with their customers, many of the old ways of operating just don’t work anymore. As we all navigate a COVID-19 world, it’s time to Redesign the Experience.

Joey Coleman (01:34):
It’s been a long time Dan, but it’s time to talk about flying again.

Dan Gingiss (01:40):
Ahhhh, I’ve been waiting for this. Have you been on a plane?

Joey Coleman (01:42):
I actually have not, but I’m starting to think about it a lot more and will likely be on a plane sometime in the not too distant future. Vaccines are up. COVID infections are down. Events are starting to happen again. It’s exciting. And what I wanted to talk about is all of the businesses that have seen their loyal customers, who while staying loyal, just haven’t been doing as much business in the last year.

Dan Gingiss (02:08):
Oh, you mean like our friends at the airlines?

Joey Coleman (02:10):
Yes indeed, like the airlines. And as anyone who listens to Experience This knows…

Dan Gingiss (02:16):
Wait a minute! I think I know what you’re going to say. You like Delta don’t you?!

Joey Coleman (02:19):
No, I don’t like Delta, Dan. I love Delta! I love flying on Delta for a host of reasons, but because of changes in the event industry over the last year, I haven’t needed to fly to any of the conferences or events that I normally would to give speeches at. I’ve been doing all my presentations remotely as have you. And now, as businesses are starting to think about hosting in-person events and conferences this summer, and especially into the fall, I’m getting a lot of inquiries for these upcoming events, which means naturally I’m thinking about flying again. Now that being said, you know, who else was thinking about me flying again, Dan?

Dan Gingiss (02:56):
Uh, your wife, your kids. I don’t know? Who?

Joey Coleman (03:01):
You are. Correct. All of those people are, but I’m talking specifically about the fantastic folks at Delta airlines. The reason I know they’re thinking about this is because I received an email this week outlining some fantastic new bonuses that they have to entice fliers to come back now as noted by Dwight James, who is the Senior Vice President of Customer Engagement and Loyalty and the CEO of Delta Vacations, and I quote, “[o]ur customers, supported us through the most difficult year in our history. And as we welcome them back, we want to help their travel count for even more. We sincerely appreciate how much our customers value their status and these industry leading offers will ensure Medallion Members can continue to enjoy those benefits for flights now, and in the future.” Now the message went on to detail, a series of new enhancements to the Delta loyalty program, including earning up to 75% more miles towards your medallion status on nearly every Delta flight, earning miles toward your medallion status with award travel (this is a first ever in the airline industry – normally if you use your miles to get a free ticket, you don’t get to get miles for that free ticket. Now they’re actually going to let you accrue miles on your award tickets) and all of these bonuses will be “credited to customer’s accounts for a seamless experience.”

Dan Gingiss (04:31):
American Airlines… I hope you’re listening because you’re going to be next I suspect! But Hey, I mean, I love it. I’m a, I’m a rewards guy spent a lot of time in loyalty marketing and you know, those are fantastic. They’re rich, uh, which basically means I hate to break your bubble, they’re probably going to be temporary, but I think it’s a great time for temporary richness, if you will, because you know, people are – even frequent flyers like us are still hesitant to go back to flying. We probably won’t go back to as much flying as we were doing at, you know, at least for a while, maybe ever. And so the airlines have some work to do to get people back in their seats. And I think as usual Delta seems to be leading the way in terms of enticing people.

Joey Coleman (05:21):
You know, Dan, I feel the same way. And I think the interesting thing about this outreach is it’s coming at a time where a lot of frequent flyers like you like me are just really starting to seriously think about this. Like to be honest, last summer, you couldn’t have paid me to get on an airplane. And that’s not a criticism of any of the airplanes I love flying. It’s just, it didn’t make sense with the pandemic. But now as things start to change now, as people start to consider it, what I think is fantastic about the timing of this message is that as I’m starting to think about, they’re in my inbox saying, Hey, by the way, when you’re ready, no pressure, but when you’re ready, we’re going to do some amazing things for you. Now what’s interesting is this all comes on the heels of the things Delta did last year to make the experience better for the frequent flyers – including being the first airline to extend 2020 flyer status into 2021, and the only airline to offer rollover status miles, which are kind of known as MQMS in Delta airlines, speak to give customers a headstart on their 2022 status.

Dan Gingiss (06:31):
So you’re saying that miles you earned before the pandemic in 2020 are counting now?

Joey Coleman (06:39):
Not only are they counting for my status, now they are actually rolling over and counting towards my next status. What Delta did is they said, look, the pandemic has changed everything, whatever status you have in 2020, we’re automatically giving you that status in 2021, regardless of how you fly in 2020. Oh. And by the way, if you do happen to fly in 2020 or 2021, any extra miles that you’ve accrued across those two years will kick into your status for 2022. So they are doing these amazing things to really reward people for doing the behavior they want, which is getting on airplanes. They also made a bunch of other improvements to their upgrade certificates. They made the more rewarding and easier to use. Their companion tickets – so any companion tickets that were going to expire in 2020, they extended to 2021. And they just announced that all of those are being extended out to 2022. So all these companions tickets that I had, that I would’ve been frustrated that I wasn’t able to use because we weren’t flying. They’re like, man, don’t worry about it. You have till the middle of 20, 22 to use those as well as extending other deadlines around using your benefits. So they could take into account that delays in people’s travel plans that have happened over the last year.

Dan Gingiss (07:55):
Yeah. Well, and basically we talk about knowing your customer and we’ve talked about that at no time in the past, and hopefully the future, will there ever have been more clarity about understanding what your customers are going through because everybody went through the same thing at the same time. And so I think Delta is smart in the sense that, you know, they understand they got to get people back on planes. They understand that customers like you, who are the, I dunno, what are you the triple diamond deleted, double, double dare, whatever status is. I mean, these are the people they really need back and their most loyal customers. And you know, they’re what I like about these examples is they’re very timely right there. They understand what frequent travelers who pay attention to this stuff MQMS and miles and, you know, qualifying dollars and all this sort of stuff that they understand what you’re thinking about. And the fact that, Oh man, I traveled for three months in 2020, and I was well on my way. And then I lost them all. And, and they’re addressing that almost before. It becomes a frustration, which I think is great.

Joey Coleman (09:05):
I couldn’t agree more, Dan. And here’s the interesting thing and why I wanted to talk about this. This doesn’t just apply to the airlines. Every business on the planet over the last year that had any type of in-person interaction with their customers – whether you had a retail store, whether you had an event venue that people came to hotels, airlines, other forms of a mass transportation gathering places, you name it, movie theaters, anywhere where people came to visit, they’re now going to start thinking about going there again – but people are going to be anxious. And they’re going to be anxious for good reason. We’re not judging the anxiousness that people have. And a lot of business owners are like, ah, already come, come visit our store. We need the business. We want you back. Everything’s clean, everything’s safe. We’re good to go. The moral, that story here is we are going beyond the medical realities and now we’re starting to dip into the psychological realities of our customer base. And so I think what Delta is doing is really leading the way by to your point, being rich with what they’re offering and going above and beyond, you know, they, you notice they don’t say that these are going to be the rules forever. They’re just saying, Hey, for the, basically the second half of 2021, we’re going to do a bunch of things that will excite you to get back on planes. So what’s the moral of the story here. Let your customers know that you’re ready to welcome them back to in-person interactions. Welcome them on their schedule. Not your schedule. Consider some gracious enticements to get them to come back sooner rather than later, or at least to feel well provided for when they do come back. You don’t need to make these changes permanently, but take some steps now to kind of juice things up and make it exciting for them so that they come back extend any deadlines that you have friends pandemics. Aren’t the time for policies. I said this on the show a year ago, as we entered the challenging COVID era. And here we are a year later, and guess what? This same message holds true. Pandemics aren’t the time for policies. So switch your policies to be even more customer centric and more customer focused than they were before. And if you do all these things, your customers will come back in the weeks and months to come.

Joey Coleman (11:27):
We love telling stories and sharing key insights you can implement or avoid based on our experiences. Can you believe that This Just Happened?

Joey Coleman (11:41):
You know, Dan, last week I saw a video online and then within about 36 hours, I’d say no, fewer than 10 of my friends emailed a link to this video. Now I know if I were to ask you to guess what this video is about, I would be opening myself to all kinds of ridicule and jokes that you might have. So let me just say this…

Dan Gingiss (12:03):
Who me?

Joey Coleman (12:03):
Surprise, surprise! Let me just say this. The video was of something called ski riding. Now I had never seen ski riding before ski riding is what happens evidently based on this video, when you put on a pair of skis and you’re wearing a paraglider, which is like a controllable parachute that you can inflate from the ground as opposed to jumping out of an airplane. So this is, think of a combination of paragliding, i.e. parachuting, through a mountain ski town, while you’re also wearing skis, doing stunts and tricks.

Dan Gingiss (12:44):
This sounds like a X Games sport or something like that…

Joey Coleman (12:47):
It does sound like an X Game sport, which is probably not surprising then that the sponsor of this video was actually red bull. Oh, red bull. Yeah. Well, they’ve had some interesting stunts in the past they have, and this is kind of the newest piece. So what I’d like to do ladies and gentlemen, I know this is an audio based show. So it’s going to be little weird to talk about a video without you having seen the video. So what I’d like you to do is press pause, go to the shownotes at ExperienceThisShow.com and at the very top, you’re going to see a big link to the Red Bull ski riding video. And I want you to watch the video. Now, if you happen to be driving or working out right now, and you’re not going to do it, I’m going to play for you the first minute of the video with some narration, but please I’ve never implored with such a emphasis. Go watch this video. It is insane. Just even what you’re about to witness the feet of human extreme sports nature that is captured in this video, that alone is we’re seeing not to mention what we’re going to talk about. All right? So here’s the deal. When you go to the video, here’s what you’ll see.

Joey Coleman (14:04):
You hear the wind blowing through your air. As the skier comes over, does a loop. He’s flying through the air. There’s a drone behind him tracking down the mountain as he goes to over trees. And now he’s cutting between two buildings. That sound, you just heard that one, and that one, that’s him actually running into the sides of buildings with his skis. Now here that like the laser sound, that’s his skis on the metal that is the chairlift, not actually on the chairs, but on the metal cables, connecting the chairs. This is insane. He’s parachuting down. He just almost hit some birds. And now off the railing and he’s going off the snow with the top of buildings. Now, his feet are actually on the ground. The first time he’s grabbing the parachute and he’s bundling it up into a ball in front of him. Now he’s tucking down and he’s going faster and faster. Oh my goodness. He just went through an igloo, jumped out of the other side, do a flip he’s firing off. Oh my God, she’s got a can of Red Bull. He’s drinking red bull. He just threw it in the recycling bin. Now he’s, reinflating the parachute you skiing around. Okay. Oh my goodness. We could go on. I have given you a minute and six seconds of this video that is over two minutes long. It is crazy. It’s crazy to see this now, why would I want to tell you about a video? Because the video captured so much excitement, so much spirit for the brand and showed me things that I didn’t even think was possible. And as a result, I wanted to talk about what I had seen. Now. Here’s the crazy thing. Who is the video for stopping to remember the beginning of this conversation? When Dan said, Oh, it sounds like an X games type of thing. And I told you the brand, we’ve only mentioned the brand once, but I’d be willing to bet you remember who it was. Dan, who is the brand?

Dan Gingiss (15:59):
I’m going to go with red bull for 200.

Joey Coleman (16:04):
That would be red bull.

Dan Gingiss (16:05):
So Dan, are you a red bull drinker? What do you know about red bull? I am not a red bull drinker. I tasted it once. It is, let’s just say not for me. And, uh, but I, I associate it with extreme sports with, with people that are outdoor Z, you know, doing all these sports, I kind of like to keep my feet on the ground. And so I kinda, I, I associated with people who are more willing to have their feet off the ground. Let’s put it that way.

Joey Coleman (16:33):
A little crazy, a little adventurous. And here’s the reason I wanted to talk about this. Red Bull has made an aspirational video. Even if you never have any intention, Dan, of putting skis on and attaching yourself to a parachute and speedriding through an Alpine town that appears abandoned in the video, doing flips in the air, bouncing off buildings, sliding down the cables of a chairlift at a ski resort, you can appreciate what you saw. And I think the takeaway that I had as it relates to customer experience is we talk so often about the features and the benefits of our products. You know, this is the very elements of our products. You know, here are the components of our service. Here’s what it’s going to do for your business. And we don’t as often talk about the aspirational aspects of our products and our services, what type of people use our products and services? What type of people do our customers become because of our products and services. And if we think back to commercials, you may have seen in the past from Red Bull, they drank it in these little wings appear and they kind of float off the characters. The whole idea is that red bull takes you to a different level of the human experience that you didn’t think was possible.

Dan Gingiss (17:58):
Yeah, it’s very brand, right. I mean, I remember the viral video around the guy that was jumping out of the, what was it, a rocket ship, any, uh, he jumped out of it with

Joey Coleman (18:09):
Exactly. Yeah. They basically put them up in a balloon into space and he jumped out and fell all the way back down to earth.

Dan Gingiss (18:17):
It definitely has an element of crazy to it, but that’s the brand. And I think that today, I always talk about something slightly different, but I, I talk about being witty and being humorous and those are two different things and that there’s only certain brands and I think of brands like Taco Bell or Wendy’s that kind of have permission to be humorous. And unfortunately, most of us don’t work for Taco Bell or Wendy’s, it’s our brand probably doesn’t have that permission.

Joey Coleman (18:44):
And then why do you think they have permission? Because I think that’s an interesting way to put it. I have an idea of why they have permission. Why do you think they have permission to be that way?

Dan Gingiss (18:54):
Well, first of all, I think their target audience is, is fairly specifically at a younger, a younger type of person, a millennial and younger, uh, who appreciates that kind of a humor. And I think over time, actually, I think they’ve built that permission and built the reputation over time of being humorous, funny brands, much as Red Bull has built this reputation of being, you know, an extreme sports, loving, daredevil type brand, which again, your listeners listening your brand probably isn’t that, but that’s okay because your brand is probably something else is really what I’m saying.

Joey Coleman (19:34):
Agreed. And I think when you say, you know, they have permission to do that. I think part of the reason I agree with you wholeheartedly, that they built that equity over time with their target markets and what their customers, that that’s kind of the edginess or that’s the aspect of their brand spirit. But I also think they made a decision to go in and just be who they were. To just show up fully without any apology for what their brand was. We’ve all come to appreciate the brand of Wendy’s on social media. We’ve all come to appreciate the extreme nature of Red Bull, whether it’s in their videos, whether it’s in their sponsorships, the crazy stunts they do, you know, kind of the feature film-type level production that they create. And I think the conversation that I’d love our listeners to have is to meet with your teams and talk about what is the aspirational version of our brand. When people use our products, when people use our services, what does it allow them to be? And really extend that out beyond just the benefits to speak more to this type of person uses our product. You know, Dan, you, and it is often back and forth about Apple vs. PC, right? And I am a 100% Apple guy. Through and through. I know you use a lot of Apple products as well, but I think Apple has basically created a brand that people take pride in being an Apple person, because Apple is owning the brand and the aesthetic of their videos, the aesthetic of their ads, the messaging of their communications, all align with that brand in the same way that red bulls aligned with their brand with this crazy skiing video. So what do we do from here? I’m not suggesting that you take your CEO, strap them into a parachute, put some skis on them and throw them down the side of a mountain. Okay. What I am suggesting is that you think of creative ways to capture your brand spirit. As much as you create advertising and things that are designed to promote your brand and promote your service, I would love it. If you would start to consider creating aspirational communications – things that capture your brand spirit, promote that and let people know who they can be when they experience your brand.

Joey Coleman (21:56):
Almost everyone has interacted with chatbots but all too often, it’s been a bad experience. In MythBusters – presented by Solvvy – we explore a common myth about CX chatbots and see how the right technology can create a positive experience every time.

Joey Coleman (22:20):
Today’s myth about chatbots? Chatbots, can’t drive revenue for your business. At this point, CX and support leaders probably understand that an intelligent chat bot and automation platform can help deliver huge savings and productivity improvements. A next gen chat bot instantly resolves 50% plus of customer issues before support tickets are needed and frees up agents to handle the most challenging issues.

Dan Gingiss (22:48):
But can a chat bot actually drive additional revenue for your business? Why? Yes, it can. With the next gen chatbot companies now have a powerful tool to help would be customers quickly find what they’re looking for, enabling better and faster purchases. Chatbots handle product or service questions for shoppers and provide intelligent recommendations based on the chat or other contextual clues. Your customers will love not having to hunt around a website to find what they need. And some chatbots let you drop items right into a shopping cart or buy directly that’s instant chat bot revenue.

Joey Coleman (23:24):
For your current customers or subscribers, how cool would it be if your support chat bot was able to help them add additional software licenses, right? When they ask or help them upgrade from a free meme account to a paid account.

Dan Gingiss (23:39):
Or help them take advantage of an extended deadline and a companion certificate on Delta Airlines to get you to book your flight?!

Joey Coleman (23:45):
Exactly. If your team handles these sorts of critical transactions, you know, they can often result in phone calls that take up a ton of agent time. And the intelligent chat bot means faster transactions for your customers, lower agent involvement, and you guessed it more revenue from your team.

Dan Gingiss (24:05):
And that’s another myth busted, thanks to our friends and podcast supporters at Solvvy – the NextGen chatbot. Find them at Solvvy.com. That’s S-O-L-V-V-Y.com.

Joey Coleman (24:21):
There are so many great customer experience articles to read, but who has the time?! We summarize them and offer clear takeaways you can implement starting tomorrow. Enjoy this segment of CX Press – where we read the articles so you don’t need to!

Joey Coleman (24:39):
Dan, I have a question for you. What is the greatest number of zoom calls you’ve done in a single day?

Dan Gingiss (24:47):
Oh boy. Well, I wouldn’t call it great by any stretch of imagination, but I’d say probably in the neighborhood of eight or nine is maybe my tops.

Joey Coleman (24:55):
Wow, wow. Yeah. I’m not sure what my record count number is for the number of calls. But the other day I got on my first Zoom call at 6:45 AM and I didn’t get off my last Zoom call of the day until 10:00 PM. And I had a total of 60 minutes throughout the day in frankly, 10 to 20 minute chunks, when I wasn’t on Zoom. And to be honest, that’s why today’s CX press story written by Anna Schaverien – who’s a reporter for the New York Times who covers news from her home base in London – resonated so much with me. The article is titled, “Citi creates Zoom-free Fridays to Combat Pandemic Fatigue,” and it details plans that the bank has to create one day each week, when workers can avoid being on camera for internal calls.

Dan Gingiss (25:45):
For a minute there, I thought you were talking about like an entire city, but you’re talking about the bank.

Joey Coleman (25:49):
Yes. Citi banks, Citi Group – they’re mostly known for Citibank.

Dan Gingiss (25:53):
Indeed, well, I love this idea. And in fact, because of a LinkedIn post recently from, uh, our mutual friend, Dorie Clark, I actually have started blocking Fridays off of my calendar for similar reasons is that you just sometimes need a day to get work done. And you know, one of the biggest reasons I left corporate America was I hated the meetings. I just didn’t like going back to back to back to back to all these meetings. And I always found that there were certain colleagues, who will remain nameless, that it’s like the meetings were what made them feel important.

Joey Coleman (26:28):
Meeings about meetings?!

Dan Gingiss (26:32):
Well, if they weren’t in the meeting, they didn’t feel like they were included. And so they were always, well, you know, invite me to the meeting. And I was like, don’t invite me to the meeting because when I’m in meetings, I’m not getting work done. And I think that’s what guessing this article kind of gets at is, man we could spend all day on Zoom, but are you actually being productive?

Joey Coleman (26:50):
A couple of things. And you’re, you’re spot on Dan and I to applaud our mutual friend, Dorie Clark friends, listeners, if you’re not familiar with Dorie and her fantastic books, her courses on LinkedIn Learning, her blog posts, her articles that she writes, she’s absolutely incredible! And you’re right. I think over the last year what’s happened is people have gotten comfortable with rolling out of bed, into a virtual meeting or spending all day. As I like to think of it sometime dressed very nicely on top with sweat pants on the bottom and this whole proliferation of video calls, whether that’s with our prospects, with our customers, even with our coworkers and our colleagues has just become exhausting. And that’s why Citi group decided to start this new end of week tradition. So going forward, they’re going to have zoom free Fridays. Now the bank’s new chief executive Jane Frazier announced this plan in a memo sent to employees: “Recognizing that workers have spent inordinate amounts of time of the past 12 months, staring at video calls, Citi is now encouraging its employees to take a step back from Zoom and other video conferencing platforms for one day every week.

Dan Gingiss (27:58):
You know, it’s funny. I just have to interrupt you for a second because I’ve been thinking about this, that Zoom is becoming one of those brands that is also a verb – like Google, or Xerox.

Joey Coleman (28:13):
Exactly. Yeah. It’s the most… prior to this, Google was the big one in our society that, uh, a brand name that it become a verb, and I agree with you in the last year, Zoom has become a verb.

Dan Gingiss (28:24):
And, and so we should say, just given that this is talking about Zoom-free Fridays, that obviously this is not a knock on Zoom. It’s really video conferencing free Fridays, but that’s a little harder to say.

Joey Coleman (28:34):
Absolutely. And I will say zoom, I think is probably a case study for the business that is handled the pandemic the best. Can you think of any other business, maybe like online grocery store delivery that has seen the huge growth that Zoom has seen over the course of the last year. And as much as we might be experiencing Zoom fatigue, they’ve done a remarkable job delivering a consistent, fantastic experience.

Dan Gingiss (29:00):
Yeah, absolutely. And there’s, I know some great people that work there. It’s a terrific company. So Frazier who’s the CEO of Citi group said in this article and I’m quoting “[t]he blurring of lines between home and work and the relentlessness of the pandemic Workday have taken a toll on our wellbeing. After listening to colleagues around the world, it became apparent. We need to combat the Zoom fatigue that many of us feel” end quote. The memo went on to note that going forward, no one at the company would have to turn their video on for any internal meetings on Fridays. External meetings with clients and regulators that need to happen via Zoom still will happen that way, even if it’s on a Friday.

Joey Coleman (29:39):
Yeah. So they’re still going to have video. They’re still going to, you know, use that as a tool. They just want to be more conscious about it. Now what’s interesting is this all too common phrase of zoom fatigue that we’ve heard about has led to some recent research from Stanford university that they talked about in the article and the research was trying to figure out why video calls feel so draining and in a peer reviewed article that was published in the journal Technology Mind and Behavior, professor Jeremy Bailenson, who’s the founding director of the Stanford Virtual Human Interaction Lab detailed several reasons why video calls can be so much more exhausting than in-person conversations, including: number one, the excessive eye contact involved in video calls. Number two, the unnatural situation of seeing ourselves on screen while we’re doing a video call and number three, having to stay in the same fixed spot during the call.

Dan Gingiss (30:34):
And I don’t know if this is the same study or not Joey, but I was listening to NPR today. And I heard about a study that also said that one of the after effects of spending so much time on video conferencing is that it is causing people to get too tired while they’re driving afterwards. And it’s causing so much fatigue that the people are now advising that if you’ve spent a lot of time in video conferencing, that you take a break, that you get your blood pumping before you get behind the wheel of a car.

Joey Coleman (31:07):
Oh wow. This looks like those “do not operate heavy machinery” warning signs, right?

Dan Gingiss (31:12):
Yeah. It’s, it’s really, really interesting. So this research also noted that because we have to put in more effort to make an interpret nonverbal communications video calls are more tiring. I think this might be the same research because that’s what this NPR story said as well. So Professor Bailenson said, quote, “[i]f you want to show someone that you’re agreeing with them, you have to do an exaggerated nod or put your thumb up. That adds cognitive load as you’re using mental calories in order to communicate” unquote. In fact, a key mistake that companies made when setting up work from home conditions last year was to treat zoom calls as the equivalent of face to face meetings, without considering that additional mental burden placed on workers and the downtime need to process what was said between the calls.

Joey Coleman (31:59):
So true, Dan, you know, at the end of the day, I’m not anti-video call. And I don’t think this article in this research is either what I do think we need to consider is giving ourselves and our colleagues and our co-workers permission not to do video calls, permission, to take more breaks, permission to set up Zoom-free days where we do no Zoom calls. I would argue that we should also have meeting free days where we have no meetings whatsoever so that we can have more time to actually be productive and get work done. And I’ll tell you one little tip in closing that I found has been incredibly effective. When somebody wants to set a schedule, a call, I’ve actually been starting to suggest that we do a walking call and the way the walk-in call works is instead of doing Zoom, why don’t we call each other on our cell phones and agree to walk around the block? It’s the socially distanced, you know, pandemic acceptable way to get a little exercise, to break some of that Zoom fatigue and to address that kind of pandemic video weight that we’ve all been experiencing. So as the pandemic begins to ebb, as we think about getting back to our offices, as we think about more in-person meetings, I encourage you to manage your own schedule and your habits more and make sure that you’re not causing your own fatigue.

Joey Coleman (33:20):
Thanks for joining us for another episode of Experience This! You are the best listener ever!

Dan Gingiss (33:31):
And since you listened to the whole show…

Joey Coleman (33:33):
Yay you!

Dan Gingiss (33:35):
We’re curious… Was there a specific part of this episode that you enjoyed the most? If so, it would mean the world to us if you could share it with a coworker, a friend, or someone that just loves listening to podcasts,

Joey Coleman (33:46):
And while you’re in the sharing mood, if you felt inclined to jump over to iTunes – or wherever you find your podcasts – and write us a review, we would so appreciate it. And when you do, don’t forget to let us know as we might have a little surprise for you.

Dan Gingiss (34:00):
Thanks again for your time and we’ll see you next week for more.

Joey Coleman (34:04):
Experience!

Dan Gingiss (34:05):
This!