Episode 126 – Predicting Key Elements of Future Customer Experiences

Join us as we discuss the importance of being relevant to your customers, how augmented reality is helping to ease purchase decisions, and how to use data to drive predictive CX.

Expectations, Simplifications, and Permutations – Oh My!

Referenced in the Show

• Coveo Relevance Report 2021: Ecommerce

• Empire Carpet Augmented Reality

• Prediction: The Future of CX – McKinsey Quarterly

Host Contact Information

Email Dan: Dan@dangingiss.com

Tweet Dan Gingiss: @DGingiss

Email Joey: JoeyC@JoeyColeman.com

DanGingiss.com

JoeyColeman.com

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Episode Transcript

Download an unedited transcript of Episode 126 here or read it below:

Joey Coleman (00:05):
Welcome to Experience This!

Dan Gingiss (00:07):
The podcast that celebrates remarkable customer experiences and inspires you to stand out from the competition by wowing your customers.

Joey Coleman (00:17):
Each episode, we bring you a healthy dose of inspiring stories, funny interactions, and practical takeaways. Marketing and customer experience thought leader, Dan Gingiss…

Dan Gingiss (00:30):
shares the mic with customer retention and employee experience expert, Joey Coleman, helping you to get people talking about your business.

Joey Coleman (00:40):
So get ready because it’s time to Experience This!

Dan Gingiss (00:48):
Get ready for another episode of the Experience This Show!

Joey Coleman (00:55):
Join us as we discuss the importance of being relevant to your customers, how augmented reality is helping to ease purchase decisions, and how to use data to drive predictive CX.

Dan Gingiss (01:10):
Expectations, Simplifications, and Permutations – oh, my!

Joey Coleman (01:19):
Surveys, reports, studies, and reviews. There are some great resources that look at consumer behavior to find emerging trends and established patterns. We dig through the data and bring you the key takeaways in this edition of Inside The Numbers.

Dan Gingiss (01:41):
So I wanted to share with our listeners a brand new report out from a company called Coveo, which in full disclosure is a client of mine, but I’m sharing the report because it touches on a concept of customer experience. I don’t think we’ve talked a lot about, and that people generally are not talking enough about, and that is the concept of relevance. And they did a very interesting survey where they talked to nearly 2,000 consumers about their frustrations and challenges across three kinds of digital experiences: e-commerce, customer service, and employee experience. So I wanted to walk through this with you, Joey and our listeners, because I think this is something you tell me, are you getting what I’m trying to say?

Joey Coleman (02:33):
No, I agree. I think it’s interesting. When, when you said we want to talk about something we haven’t really talked about on the show. You’re right. Not only do we not spend a lot of time talking about it on the show, but to be Frank, it’s not a word that I hear come up in a lot of customer experience conversations.

Dan Gingiss (02:48):
Yeah. And what Coveo is trying to convey to people is that it should be the word that comes up in customer experience conversation. So let’s talk about these three experiences: e-commerce, customer service, and employee experience one at a time. Now with e-commerce I thought this was absolutely stunning: 90% of consumers expect online shopping to be equal to, or better than, the in-store experience. So Coveo CEO and chairman Louis Têtu said that it’s the Moore’s Law of digital experience expectations, which I thought was awesome because it’s interesting to put that. Yeah. Yeah. Instead of doubling the computing power defined by the original Moore’s law, he’s talking about the rapid improvement of relevant digital experiences and our demand for them.

Joey Coleman (03:38):
Yeah Dan, you know, in many ways while the percentage is certain – 90%, that’s huge/surprised me – in some ways, it didn’t especially given the dramatic shift to e-commerce that is especially occurred in the last year. And I think the reality is for years e-commerce solutions were presenting themselves as better than the store. It’s more convenient than the store. We have better selection than the store. You don’t have to get dressed up. You don’t have to deal with, you know, a clueless sales associate. You don’t have to be harassed in the store by people saying, can I help you find something? You know, there, there were all these reasons why e-commerce was stacked up as being so much better than the in-store experience. So it’s not entirely surprising to me that it’s supposed to be better. What was interesting is that 50% of customers, in their research, said that they sometimes, or always experienced a problem when shopping online, I got to tell ya, I pretty rarely experience a problem shopping online, but it was a good reminder that, uh, there’s a lot of folks out there that still aren’t doing a lot of e-commerce. In fact, I saw a post on Facebook a few weeks ago from somebody that actually is, uh, you know, is in this town, that small town that I grew up in saying, is it really okay to give my credit card to somebody online, like an online merchant ,to buy something from an online store? And this is in 2021. Now one could look at that and judge it and say, Oh my gosh, where have they been? How have they not purchased anything online up until now? But what I took from it is that they’re still a huge swath of the public that has not done a lot of online transactions.

Dan Gingiss (05:26):
Yeah, for sure. And what I also took away from it is half the people saying they’ve experienced a problem that is not good. I mean, that’s a problem – so alarm bells going off in my head. Now, one of the biggest problems that they’re experiencing is it shoppers just want to find what they’re looking for and this gets back to a discussion that we’ve had now for a couple episodes about user experience and 47% of those surveyed have challenges with website search, 42% say that finding information is the most common problem experienced online, and 43% are having issues with website navigation. People.

Joey Coleman (06:05):
That’s the darn navigation coming back again. We’ve talked about that before!

Dan Gingiss (06:09):
But why are we making it so difficult for customers to find what they’re looking for? It just doesn’t make any sense to me.

Joey Coleman (06:15):
It doesn’t, it doesn’t. I think, you know, the, the last piece of research on the e-commerce side that I thought was interesting in this report was that 43% of consumers said they’d pay more if they could find what they were looking for in just a few clicks. And the number was actually higher with millennials. And I think it speaks back to something. We have talked a lot about on the show, which is speed and convenience. If you’re going to tell me that it’s so much better buying it online, I better be able to find it online faster than I could find it walking around in the store, trying to determine what shelf it’s on.

Dan Gingiss (06:49):
Yeah, I mean, if we’re not shopping online for speed and convenience, then what are we shopping online for?

Joey Coleman (06:56):
Well, you know, there are some other reasons, you know, as far as like social distancing and you know, things like that, but it’s not enough to just be able to do it from the comfort of your own home, wearing your pajamas. Right? You need to be able to actually make the shopping experience faster than going into the store.

Dan Gingiss (07:14):
Absolutely. So let’s talk about customer service, which is another speaker out there who will remain nameless once said is “what happens when customer experience breaks.” That’s one of my favorite definitions of customer service. 73% of customers, according to this study will abandon a brand after three or fewer negative customer service experiences. Now, to be honest, what surprised me about this was that it wasn’t one. Okay.

Joey Coleman (07:42):
Right! Three or fewer… you were thinking the fewer was one!

Dan Gingiss (07:45):
Yeah. I mean three strikes – that’s a lot of strikes for a bad customer service experience, given that you’re not getting to customer service, unless something has already gone wrong with the customer experience. So customer service folks is the time where you have a chance to save the experience. And if things are still going wrong at the service level, you’re not going to keep customers for long.

Joey Coleman (08:08):
Interestingly, two of the top frustrations causing people to abandon a brand are the inability to find information, including contact information for customer service or content on how to use, fix, or maintain a purchase (that was 44% of the respondents) and then 23% of the respondents complained about getting conflicting information from customer service. Friends, when I call customer service, or when I contact customer service, I’m expecting them to know all the answers. And when I get conflicting answers from customer service, well that’s when customer service becomes a customer nightmare!

Dan Gingiss (08:48):
Absolutely. Now here’s something speaking of nightmares that should cause you to lose sleep and have nightmares throughout the night. 44% of consumers will rarely or never complain to a company about a negative customer service experience. Instead, they will just leave.

Joey Coleman (09:12):
The silent ghosters! The silent… you won’t even know! They just peace out. They’re done. They’ve had their Fill.

Dan Gingiss (09:18):
This is what I like to call the leaky bucket, and every company has one. We’re focused on the front door. We’re focused on bringing lots of new people in and increasing sales. And we’re missing the fact that people are walking out the back door while we’re not paying attention. And the nice customers walk out the back door and tell us what we did wrong because at least they give us a chance to fix it for the next guy. But most customers don’t do that. And here are the numbers: 44% are just going to ghost you after a bad experience – something that would keep me up at night, I’ll say,

Joey Coleman (09:50):
Yeah. And what’s crazy is the same research showed that 47% said that they would tell a family member or a friend about that negative experience. So here’s the freight train friends, they don’t tell you what went wrong, but they tell everyone they know what went wrong. This is kind of the double whammy – because not only do you not have the chance to improve it or to resolve the situation or retain that customer by trying to make it right, you don’t even know what happened. But that is the leading conversation they’re having with their network about why they should never do business with you.

Dan Gingiss (10:31):
Absolutely. But to end things on a positive note in this section, 53% of consumers are likely to tell a family member or friend about a positive customer service experience. Now we talked about this in the last episode with your niece, getting to drive the golf cart over the wall, what an amazing positive experience. And of course your brother told everybody about it. And guys that’s what happens when we have positive experiences. We want to tell everybody about it. So I was happy that the numbers here bore that out. That 53% are willing to tell someone about a positive, 47% will say the same thing about a negative experience. That’s both good news and bad news. Let’s move on to employee experiences. It’s just the third part of the study. And this was a little bit different, but I think still really, really interesting because relevance is important to employees also. In particular, when we were hearing before about people being frustrated from a customer service agent, either not knowing the answer, or giving conflicting information, often this is a problem with the training and the information that we provide to our agents. And so relevance is really key there too. Now, speaking of relevance workers reported in this study that they spent two and a half hours of every day searching for the information that they need to do their jobs. That is 12 and a half hours a week times the number of your employees, times whatever you pay them per hour. That is a lot of money being wasted!

Joey Coleman (12:03):
That gasp? Followed by a thud that you heard in the background? Was me falling over at this data! I am blown away. I’m, I’m not surprised, but I’m just shocked that in this day and age, we still aren’t giving employees what they need. And in fact, interestingly enough, with all the information we are giving our employees, a lot of it is irrelevant to their specific job. And in fact, the survey showed that 41% of all information was completely irrelevant to the specific job that employee had. You know, Dan I’m in the process of working on my next book, which is all about employee experience and let me tell you this research is not only supporting the case studies and the data that we have, but it’s just reinforcing that in every business you have your customer experience advocates, those same advocates need to be the employee experience advocates and vice versa. I would love to see everybody who’s in customer experience and customer service come together with everybody in HR and just say, let’s have a kumbaya moment, all of us who hold hands and make this situation better, because it is a nightmare for both the customers and the employees, especially as it’s clear from this study, when it comes to relevance.

Dan Gingiss (13:22):
For sure, I mean, 16% of people said they’re ready to quit because the frustrations around being able to find information to do their job, while nearly half of employees are less engaged in their work and feel less confident in their daily activities because of this.

Joey Coleman (13:38):
Yeah. And last but not least, this is, and we saved this one for last because this one, I think, ties all the other ones together, right? It ties the e-commerce to the customer service to the employee experience. 85% of employees are not completely confident in the information that they share externally. They’re worried that the information is out of date. It’s irrelevant, it’s inaccurate, or they aren’t even sure if they’re allowed to share it. Friends, 85% of employees aren’t sure. And if you don’t think that has a dramatic impact on your customer experience. Oh my goodness. I don’t know what to tell you.

Dan Gingiss (14:21):
All right. Well, if you’d like to see the entire report from Coveo, e’re going to drop the link in our show notes at ExperienceThisShow.com in this episode, and definitely check out this report because it is fascinating. And definitely we’ve got some good ideas now on what we can do to stay relevant to both our customers and our employees.

Joey Coleman (14:45):
Just because you have required elements of your business, doesn’t mean they need to be boring. It’s time to get creative, have some fun, and make people sit up – and take notice! Get your customers talking when you Make the Required Remarkable.

Dan Gingiss (15:04):
Joey, have you ever used AR ()or augmented reality as part of a shopping experience?

Joey Coleman (15:10):
You know, Dan in the interest of full disclosure, I have not, but I’ve thought about it. I’ve seen some of the various AR tools that are available for shopping, but I’m a rookie. I haven’t done it yet.

Dan Gingiss (15:22):
Well, the first time I was exposed to this and I may have told this story before was when I was in Tokyo, visiting the famed Ginza shopping district, and…

Joey Coleman (15:31):
one of the best shopping districts in the world – absolutely amazing place.

Dan Gingiss (15:35):
And I know… This was about 10 years ago, and I remember I was walking with, uh, uh, somebody who was working for a bank and they were showing me this was a pilot. It wasn’t even out to the public yet. And they were walking with their cell phone down the street and with the camera on, and as we were passing by stores, there would be coupons and specials and offers that would pop up from those stores because the phone knew that you were standing in front of XYZ store, XYZ store had so many offers loaded up, and you literally, as you walked down the street, your screen updated with the current offers that were going on at these stores. So really, really cool. I didn’t think a whole lot about it because I hadn’t seen it in any other it really out in the wild and not in the United States in awhile. Until recently, when my fiancée and I were looking for flooring and carpeting in our house. And we contacted empire today as one of the companies that we were getting a quote from, and they have an app where you take a picture of your room, you choose the flooring or the carpeting, and with one press of the button, your picture is transformed so that it now looks like your room with the floor or the carpeting that you’ve chosen. It is amazing. And my fiancée got a little bit addicted to this and sent me maybe a few dozen photos…

Joey Coleman (17:02):
Hypothetically! Hypothetically!

Dan Gingiss (17:02):
She spent hours on this app, testing out different colors, and flooring, and different carpeting, and different, you know, how all these different things worked and it was amazing because it really gave you a sense for, Oh, that’s how the floor is going to go with our windows, or our paint on the wall or, or what have you. And I absolutely loved it.

Joey Coleman (17:26):
Dan, I love this. And I know we’ve talked about this on the show, but years ago I found out that the best selling issue of Architectural Digest magazine every year is their before and after issue, where they show a house before the remodel and all the revisions that have been made and then they show a house after. And the reason scientists will you, that that’s the best issue is because most humans cannot in their mind picture what something is going to fully look like without seeing a rendering, without seeing a picture without seeing an illustration of it. This is why artists in many ways are so rare in our society because they envision what’s going to be on the canvas before they start. The average person can’t do that. And so it is not surprising that this app was such a wonderful tool for your fiancée to be able to use, to kind of see all the different variations, not to mention, Oh my gosh, it’s such an easier way than going to the store and getting swatches, which usually are about the size of a quarter of a dollar bill. Right. You know, it’s like, Hey, we, we didn’t want to give you the full post-it note size. So we made it even smaller and you’re supposed to lay 30 of them out on the floor and take a guess as to what the carpeting will look like in the room. Look, it makes no sense. I love the idea of these types of apps!

Dan Gingiss (18:48):
Yeah, it was great. And so, as we were enjoying this app, I did a little research because I knew I wanted to talk about it on the show. And I wanted to see are there other companies that are using this? And I was actually somewhat surprised to find out that there are a lot of companies now, what I had heard about before, but then went and looked at it on their website was Warby Parker – which of course we’ve talked about on this show, sells glasses. And of course you can try on glasses, virtually, take pictures, share with your friends, ask how people, you know, how they think you look. And I think that’s a great use case. Joey, why don’t we go back and forth and share some other ideas?

Joey Coleman (19:28):
You know, there’s a number of ones that do this, you know, kind of building off your empire today, experience, I know IKEA, and Home Depot, and Wayfair, and Target all have variations on a theme here where you can place individual pieces of furniture in your room, or in the example of Home Depot, you can put refrigerators or chandeliers, or various things, and actually see what it’s going to look like in the room by looking through your phone.

Dan Gingiss (19:53):
Yeah. And there’s other companies that do this Brilliant Earth is a company that does this with engagement rings, as it turns out that you can, that you can try on, but there’s a few that have started to take this to a different level that I think are really, really cool. Now, one that I wanted to talk about was Nike.

Joey Coleman (20:13):
I had a feeling you were going to talk about this. This is really fascinating technology.

Dan Gingiss (20:16):
Yeah. So Nike has something called Nike Fit. And what happens is you take a picture of your feet. And the first thing the app does is it calculates your exact shoe size based on the photo of your foot. And then it allows you to choose a shoe, place it on your foot and you’re placing the exact size shoe onto your foot, which is incredible.

Joey Coleman (20:39):
Absolutely incredible. Yeah. And from, from head to toe, as one might say. Sephora has a virtual digital artist that allows you to put makeup on and see exactly what you’re going to look like with the makeup properly applied in whatever shades and colors and styles you want. Literally, we’re going to be able to dress ourselves – from head to toe – using these type of augmented reality solutions.

Dan Gingiss (21:03):
And in fact, there are already contactless dressing rooms, which of course were invented before the pandemic, but probably became a little bit more popular during the pandemic where you actually don’t have to try on the clothes because you just stand in front of a camera and the clothes, basically the clothes try on you – which is an interesting way of looking at in concept. But probably the coolest example that I found was one from Lowe’s and they introduced something called the Holo-room Test Drive. Now this allows you Joey, to pick up a power tool, say, for example, you want it to test out a chainsaw. It allows you to put on a virtual reality headset and use the tool in a safe virtual space, because we don’t want to just hand Joey a tool, a chainsaw and see…

Joey Coleman (21:55):
As somebody who grew up in the country, I know how to run a chainsaw. I’ve run a chainsaw plenty of times. However, I do understand that desire. If you haven’t run a chainsaw, it can be a pretty scary thing. I mean, they made a horror movie about a chainsaw situation, gone awry in Texas. And..

Dan Gingiss (22:16):
True story – I bought a chain saw once and I returned it because when I took it out of the box, I was afraid to use it! So I can relate to that!

Joey Coleman (22:22):
This is the perfect app for you. I love it. The Holo-Room Test Drive from Lowe’s. Absolutely brilliant.

Dan Gingiss (22:30):
So what can we learn from this? Augmented reality/virtual reality are here and they’re here to stay and a lot of brands are using them. They’re trying them out. They’re letting customers try before they buy experience things virtually. And especially if we learned anything in 2020, we have learned that “virtual reality” became our reality is an important part of the buying experience. And these things aren’t going to go away. When people can return to stores, they’re still going to be there because online shopping and e-commerce continues to grow every single year. And the more that we can do to provide our customers and prospective customers with the opportunity to feel good about their purchase before they plunk down money, the better chance we’re going to get of gaining their business.

Joey Coleman (23:23):
Almost everyone has interacted with chatbots, but all too often, it’s been a bad experience. In MythBusters – presented by Solvvy – we explore a common myth about CX chatbots and see how the right technology can create a positive experience, every time.

Dan Gingiss (23:47):
Today’s myth about chatbots? Chatbots are ugly. Now that’s quite a statement – so let me explain Joey. A lot of the chatbots on the market look like a generic text exchange you’d have on your mobile phone. They’re not unique or visually appealing in any way. And even if you wanted to change them, they’re not easy to customize. Furthermore, traditional chatbots aren’t particularly well-designed. For instance, have you ever had a chat bot shoehorn, several paragraphs of text into a tiny text bubble? Overall, an ugly chat bot experience will turn off customers and tarnish your brand.

Joey Coleman (24:27):
Now the reality is Dan that next gen chat bots are designed to delight and can be configured to be on brand. There’s no more excuse for having an ugly chat bot, modern chat bots allow you to easily choose colors, fonts, and icons for a better customer experience that feels like an extension of your website or your app. And instead of dumping, a bunch of links or robotic paragraphs of text into a tiny chat bubble, next gen chat bots use their real estate well. They cleanly and concisely display the actual answer a customer’s looking for versus dumping just paragraphs of text into the conversation. If the customer needs an image, or a video, or a link, all of that can be displayed cleanly in a way that’s elegant and representative of the brand that you want to be in the marketplace.

Dan Gingiss (25:18):
So look – poorly designed generic chatbots are going to soon be a thing of the past. Thank goodness we’ve taken care of it in websites and mobile apps. So chat bots are next. Another great example of how chat bot technology is the best it’s ever been.

Joey Coleman (25:35):
And that’s another MythBusted – thanks to our friends at Solvvy, the Next Gen Chatbot.

Joey Coleman (25:44):
There are so many great customer experience articles to read, but who has the time?! We summarize them and offer clear takeaways you can implement starting tomorrow. Enjoy this segment of CX Press – where we read the articles so you don’t need to!

Dan Gingiss (26:03):
Today’s CX Press comes to us from our friends at McKinsey and the McKinsey Quarterly, where they offer up Prediction: The Future of CX. And I thought this was a fascinating piece because it broke out into a couple of parts. The first was talking about how so many companies rely on surveys to get customer data. Now, you and I have talked about this before, Joey, I like to think of customer data in two different buckets: We have the voice of the customer (or VOC), and we have the actions of the customer (or AOC) and smart companies put both of these data points together because let’s face it, what customers say is not always what customers do.

Joey Coleman (26:49):
Wait?! They don’t always do what they say Dan?

Dan Gingiss (26:52):
That is true. That is true.

Joey Coleman (26:55):
Shocking. Shocking.

Dan Gingiss (26:55):
You learn something new every day. So McKinsey found four flaws with today’s survey based customer experience measurement systems, which I thought were pretty interesting. The first was that only 7% of the customer voice is shared with CX leaders. 7%. So what that means is that if all you’re doing is surveying, you’re only getting us a tiny sliver of the actual voice of the customer.

Joey Coleman (27:23):
They also found that only 13% of CX leaders are confident that their organization can take action on CX issues in near real time. So even if you know what you’re supposed to do, there’s this kind of reactive disconnect where the leaders aren’t confident that they can actually take action.

Dan Gingiss (27:43):
Right? And only 16% of CX leaders think that surveys allow them to address the root causes of performance, which of course is that action that they need to take. And finally, only 4% of CX leaders believe that their CX measurement system enables them to calculate a decision’s return on investment. 4%?! That’s like, none!

Joey Coleman (28:04):
Yeah. That’s, that’s, that’s a rounding error.

Dan Gingiss (28:07):
Exactly. So Mackenzie asks and I’m quoting “[w]hy use the survey to ask customers about their experiences when data about customer interactions can be used to predict both satisfaction and the likelihood that a customer will remain loyal, or bolt, or even increase their business.” And their conclusion is that predictive customer insight is the future, instead of survey mechanisms. So they gave three different examples, which I’d like to walk through. The first was a leading credit card company and having worked at a leading credit card company, I have no idea if this is the one I worked for, but I don’t think so…

Joey Coleman (28:43):
We’re not sure, but it could be, but we’re not sure…

Dan Gingiss (28:45):
All we know is it’s, it’s a leading credit card company wanted to adopt a more omni-channel strategy and boost its performance in digital channels. It focused on building a CX data and analytics stack to systematically identify, improve, and track the factors, influencing customer satisfaction and business performance across 13 priority customer journeys. The team used the analytics platform to focus its investments and operational efforts on the journeys and specific moments that made a difference for customers. And it ultimately reduced its interaction and operational costs by 10 to 25% as a result of the CX and digital transformation.

Joey Coleman (29:24):
You know, Dan, one of McKinsey’s second examples that they used is one that I had never heard of in any capacity, but it makes perfect sense. There was a US healthcare payer that built a journey lake to determine how to improve its customer care. So the journey lake synced 4 billion records across nine systems, spanning marketing, operations, sales, digital, and internet of things. And the resulting holistic customer view enabled the organization to identify operational break points or thresholds where patients often ask to speak with a supervisor or move to another channel to resolve their issue. And then they could proactively reach out to patients through the website and emails and outbound calls to settle the problem. So this was that idea of really using big data to make, take big actions.

Dan Gingiss (30:17):
I love it and, and journey lake by the way, is sort of a play on what is often referred to as a data Lake, which is basically taking all of your data and it sort of feels like it’s just a giant lake because it’s coming from all, all sorts of different places. Uh, finally, a leading airline built a machine learning system that was based on 1500 customer operations and financial variables to measure both satisfaction and predicted revenue for it’s more than 100 million customers. The system allowed the airline to identify and prioritize those customers whose relationships were most at risk because of a delay or cancellation and offer them personalized compensation to save the relationship and reduce customer defection on high priority routes. A combined team of 12 to 15 data scientists, CX experts, and external partners work together for three months to build the system and lead this first application – which resulted in an 800% uplift in satisfaction and a 60% reduction in churn for priority customers. Now, I know you like talking about airlines. What do you think about that one?

Joey Coleman (31:27):
Airlines? That’s pretty crazy. I got to admit the 800% uplift. I was like, Oh my gosh, how bad were we in the hole that we could handle an 800% uplift?

Dan Gingiss (31:36):
How could it have been a leading airline if that was the case?

Joey Coleman (31:37):
But hey, what are we doing? What I really loved was the personalized compensation. We have reached a point where if your business isn’t looking to create customer experience on an individualized, personalized, customized basis, you’re, you’re falling behind. That’s all there is to it. I don’t care how big your company is. We’ve really got to shift our mindset to recognize that when it comes to remarkable experiences, it’s not enough to develop one experience and presume that it’s a one size fits all. We need to be ready to use the data, to make the predictions, and to be nimble enough, and agile enough, to customize those interactions on an individual by individual basis.

Dan Gingiss (32:29):
Yeah. And you know, a parallel example that I could offer and, you know, feel free to use this in your new book. Joey, is that, when you have a whole bunch of employees at a company, they all like recognition, but people like recognition in different ways. Some people want to be called up in front of the whole company and have everybody applied and clap and give an owner award. And for some people that is absolutely mortifying.

Joey Coleman (32:54):
It’s the worst thing you could do.

Dan Gingiss (32:55):
Right. And other people are more motivated by money, or just a pat on the back, or a little gift, or something like that.

Joey Coleman (33:02):
Or time off! Some people will just take it. It’s like, you don’t have to pay me more, but can I leave an hour earlier next week? Yes, that was all they need.

Dan Gingiss (33:09):
I was always amazed at how much “jeans days” were an incentive to people.

Joey Coleman (33:14):
Yeah – jeans days! It was killer. When I was growing up, I went to a Catholic school where we had a uniform and we used to charge for jeans day, sometimes as a fundraiser. And Oh my gosh, every kid was all in, you know, and it was like a dollar or $5. It was, you know, a fairly inconsequential sum to get everybody to participate. But we would have, you know, 99, 99.5% participation across the student body.

Dan Gingiss (33:40):
Man, I’d like to meet that poor kid that’s still showed up in his uniform that day.

Joey Coleman (33:45):
There was always, uh, the ability to, to like gift it if you felt somebody wasn’t in a position to do it, or you know, that we would plan, try to plan ahead for those things. But yeah, it’s, it’s amazing what little things can really move the dial when it comes to engagement and satisfaction and delight.

Dan Gingiss (34:01):
Yeah, with employees, with customers, with students, whoever it is. So finally McKinsey explained four ways to turn data into insight and action. Number one: work on changing mindsets. And I’m quoting here “[w]hen asked about the biggest challenge with the current system. One chief experience officer responded people, associate CX with marketing, not technology that is changing as more and more companies take up predictive analytics. And it’s up to customer experience leaders to help encourage the change in perception.”

Joey Coleman (34:33):
Number two: break down silos and build cross-functional teams. You know, Dan always teases me as a farm kid that my go-to saying is that silos make perfect sense on the farm and they are a nightmare in your organization. I can’t believe we’re still having this conversation about breaking down silos, but it’s because there are too many of them. We need to be more cross-functional. We need to share data and share, uh, predictions and share, uh, analysis across the various divisions in our organization.

Dan Gingiss (35:03):
And remember your customers don’t care how your company is organized. Only you care about that and your executives care, but the customers don’t and frankly, they shouldn’t have to care. Number three: start with a core journey data set and build to improve accuracy. I think this is a great idea. Sometimes you just need a small win, find one part of the journey that you can focus on gathering the correct data to provide a better experience. And then when you see how it works, you share that you gain the buy in and you start working on the tougher journeys.

Joey Coleman (35:34):
Last but not least, number four: focus first on the use cases that drive quick value. You know, this seems obvious, but the number of times I’ve been in a conversation with an organization where they identify three things they want to work on and they pick the absolute hardest one that it’s going to take months, if not years, to establish ROI on I’m like folks, let’s get some momentum, let’s get some quick value so that we build excitement for these types of initiatives.

Dan Gingiss (36:02):
For sure. So this, like all of our CX Press articles, will be linked to in our show notes at ExperienceThisShow.com

Joey Coleman (36:11):
Thanks for joining us for another episode of Experience This! You are the best listener ever!

Dan Gingiss (36:22):
And since you listened to the whole show…

Joey Coleman (36:24):
Yay you!

Dan Gingiss (36:26):
were curious – was there a specific part of this episode that you enjoyed the most? If so, it would mean the world to us if you could share it with a coworker, a friend, or someone that just loves listening to podcasts.

Joey Coleman (36:37):
And while you’re in the sharing mood, if you felt inclined to jump over to iTunes, or wherever you find your podcasts, and write us a review, we would so appreciate it. And when you do, don’t forget to let us know as we might have a little surprise for you.

Dan Gingiss (36:51):
Thanks again for your time and we’ll see you next week for more…

Joey Coleman (36:55):
Experience!

Dan Gingiss (36:56):
This!