Episode 123 – Precision Produces Enhanced Experiences

Join us as we discuss an advertisement with extra special details, cutting edge research on the power of online reviews, and a creative way to get customers to follow your directions.

Skiing, Reviewing, and Cooking – Oh My!

Referenced in the Show

Check out the ad Joey saw from Stellar Equipment that showed the model’s name and size!

Host Contact Information

Email Dan: Dan@dangingiss.com

Tweet Dan Gingiss: @DGingiss

Email Joey: JoeyC@JoeyColeman.com

DanGingiss.com

JoeyColeman.com

Subscribe to Experience This on Apple Podcasts

Learn more about our Season 7 Partner – Solvvy – The NextGen Chatbot

Episode Transcript

Download an unedited transcript of Episode 123 here or read it below:

Joey Coleman (00:05):
Welcome to Experience This!

Dan Gingiss (00:07):
The podcast that celebrates remarkable customer experiences and inspires you to stand out from the competition by wowing your customers.

Joey Coleman (00:17):
Each episode, we bring you a healthy dose of inspiring stories, funny interactions, and practical takeaways. Marketing and customer experience thought leader, Dan Gingiss…

Dan Gingiss (00:30):
shares the mic with customer retention and employee experience expert, Joey Coleman, helping you to get people talking about your business.

Joey Coleman (00:40):
So get ready because it’s time to Experience This!

Dan Gingiss (00:49):
Get ready for another episode of the Experience This Show!

Dan Gingiss (00:54):
Join us as we discuss: an advertisement with extra special details, cutting edge research on the power of online reviews, and a creative way to get customers to follow your directions.

Joey Coleman (01:07):
Skiing, Reviewing, and Cooking… Oh my!

Joey Coleman (01:14):
Just because you have required elements of your business doesn’t mean they need to be boring. It’s time to get creative, have some fun, and make people sit up and take notice! Get your customers talking when you make the Required Remarkable!

Joey Coleman (01:34):
I have a question for you, Dan… When is the last time that you saw an advertisement and thought, “now, I haven’t seen that before!”

Dan Gingiss (01:41):
It’s probably like every time my 13 year old daughter finds something like the perfect pineapple corer or the avocado saver, or…

Joey Coleman (01:53):
Those slicers are lovely savers – a separate conversation.

Dan Gingiss (01:56):
Those items that only work for one thing…

Joey Coleman (01:59):
Fair enough, yeah, fair enough. I appreciate that. Well, I had an experience the other day where I got an email with an ad for something that in some ways I’d never seen before, but I had wished that I had seen many, many times, but first of all, before I explain the ad, let me give you a little backstory. So about two years ago, I stumbled across an ad on Facebook for a company called Stellar Equipment. Stellar creates high performance outdoor equipment using the best materials and factories in the world. Their specialty is ski wear jackets, pants, shells, layers. They offer entire technical outerwear systems (that’s their words – or ski outfits like you and I might say) that allow for optimal performance on the mountain while staying warm and looking good. Now they sell online and in two showrooms, one in Sweden and one in Switzerland now to be clear, Dan, I am not an amazing skier by any stretch of the imagination, but I do enjoy it. And after a decade or so of using my old ski pants and jacket, I thought it was time to invest in some upgraded ski wear. So in early 2020, about a year ago, I decided to purchase their signature system. And as a result, I started receiving their e-newsletter, which brings me to the advertisement that I referenced earlier. So if you go to our show notes page had ExperiencedThisShow.com you can see the images I’m about to describe, and we’ll include a link to the stellar website as well. So stellar sent this ad, announcing their new padded pants and shirts. This is basically a mid-layer, which is a fancy way of saying it goes over your long underwear and under your ski jacket, right? A mid-layer. And they describe the outfit as follows quote, “Using dermisaxNX from Japanese innovators Toray, this three layer shell is lightweight and stretchable while completely waterproof, completely windproof, and extremely breathable. In fact, you’ll have a hard time finding any shell material that can compete with its comfort and performance.

Dan Gingiss (04:00):
Joey windproof and breathable sounds sexy, right?

Joey Coleman (04:04):
So fun.

Dan Gingiss (04:05):
Well, it sounds pretty cool, but uh, why exactly did this ad stand out so much?

Joey Coleman (04:11):
Well, the ad stood out, not because of the copy, which was great, but because of the picture accompanying the copy now in the photograph, it showed a male model standing in a ski lodge, wearing the padded shirt and pants that were being advertised. But here’s where it got interesting super-imposed on the image was the following message. Cody is 184 centimeters and 78 kilograms or six foot one and 172 pounds wearing size L. In all my years, Dan of looking at ads where models were wearing clothing. I had never seen an ad calling the model by name and sharing their height and weight. So when I was looking at it, I could say, huh, he’s six one, I’m six, two. He weighs 172 pounds. I weigh a little more than 172 pounds. I would probably want size large. And I didn’t have to look at a sizing chart. I didn’t have to order both sizes and have them both shipped here and try and both on and decide which one fit and, you know, do the customer convenient, but environmentally unconvenient, send one back. I knew from the ad exactly what I was supposed to order if I wanted to order these clothes. So

Dan Gingiss (05:29):
I think that’s really neat. I also like the personalization of knowing his name, that it’s a real person. I think that was kind of clever. Now I want to ask you and, uh, and, and folks joy doesn’t know I’m going to ask him this question, but was your response so positive because he was so close to your size? Or, I mean, what if he was five foot, six and 320 pounds? Would you have been like, Ooh, so cool that they shared his height and weight or was it just that it happened to be close you?

Joey Coleman (05:58):
That’s a great question that I hate. I’m not exactly sure. I think it was relevant and not relevant. Here’s what I mean by that on one hand, I’m in that unique spot, especially when you think about European sizing where like in America, often I end up sizing towards the large size, maybe the extra large size that usually is height dependent in Europe though. It’s kind of a weird thing because as a general rule, Europeans maybe skew different sizes and shapes then most folks from the United States. So given that it’s a European country, I appreciated not only that they broke down and did me the courtesy of giving it to us in English instead of just in metric. But the fact that I could look at it and go six one six, two, Oh, that’s pretty close, large. I can see that, you know, there’s a little bit of extra length in the leg. That’ll probably be fine with another inch. So I think it was really useful that he was my size. What was interesting though, is if you go to the website, they also have a picture of a female model wearing their women’s version. And that version identifies the model as Emma being 169 centimeters and 56 kilograms or five foot seven, 123 pounds wearing size S – small. So again, they’re giving you some guidance visually in terms of the body shape and answering questions about the product fit that I think is going to help a prospective buyer realize not only how the outfit might look on them, which I think is lots of times what we think of when we look at a model, but also what’s it going to drape like, what’s it going to fit like?

Dan Gingiss (07:34):
Yeah, I think it’s really interesting and if I, if I could make a suggestion of even sort of where you would take it next would be to have the customer, have the ability to put in their own height and weight and to adjust the so-called model. Hey, maybe we’ll get little, Lil Miquela to be our model.

Joey Coleman (07:51):
I love that. Shout out to a previous episode, Dan love it.

Dan Gingiss (07:55):
Uh, but we could, you know, you basically, you could see a real live model that was your shape, shape and size because I think it’s great. I think it even, you know, I’m thinking to myself, okay, I’m not anywhere near six one. And so I think I probably could tell from looking at this guy that I would be a medium, but am I sure. And so I think it would be fascinating to be able to just put in your, you know, your own height and weight and get the picture or the model. But I think this is a really interesting start and I, I think it’s, I’m glad you called it out. I think it’s cool.

Joey Coleman (08:28):
Yeah. I’m excited. Cause I felt like it was a step in the right direction. I can not think of an ad that I have ever seen that called the model by name or gave their height and weight. Now sometimes you can look at it and you can make a guess, but let’s be candid – most of the models and clothing ads have bodies that the average person looking at the ad wishes that they had, you know, it’s like, hi, we’re selling this scarf with our six pack abs. And you’re like, what did the abs have to do with the scarf? Nothing. But what it does, what this ad from Stellar did is it, let me see, okay. I could see myself in these clothes and I could have a better idea of what I was going to, uh, look like wearing the clothes. You know, it’s interesting, I’m reminded of an ad. I created years ago when I was running my ad agency for a company called SMO, they were a heating oil and propane company in Southern Maryland and they did this huge rebrand and as part of the rebrand, we redesigned truck wraps for all of their vehicles. They had hundreds of vehicles and we did custom designs for the left side of the vehicle and the right side of the vehicle. So they were all different. And then we put a series of phone numbers on the different sides of the trucks, so that we could start to get an idea of which ad led to the most inbound calls, you know, kind of like split testing in a digital world but in the physical world with these trucks driving around the community, we had funny ads. We had poignant ads, but here’s the thing. The ad that drew the most phone calls was a picture of a dog in a bathtub with a line that said, “Don’t worry, we’ll keep the water warm” because they’re home heating oil and propane company, but here’s the thing, Dan, it, the phone rang off the hook like five to one for that ad. But everybody who called in wanted to know what the dog’s name was. Now, interestingly enough, the dog’s name was stock photo.com dog. You know, I mean, it was just, there was no name and we didn’t do a photo shoot. We bought a picture of a dog in a tub, but it opened my eyes in that moment to the fact that when we can personalize the advertisements, people connect at a much more emotional way, connect in a much more emotional way in a much deeper fashion.

Dan Gingiss (10:40):
Yeah. It’s like, we’ve talked about a number of products on this show where when you receive the package in the mail, it says it was packed by this person. And you know, you may not know that person, but at least you see it’s another human being or they sign their name or something like that. I’ve definitely liked the personalization. I think it’s a great ad. I love it.

Joey Coleman (11:00):
So what can we learn from this, forgive the pun, stellar ad from the team at Stellar. Like what I did there Dan? So if you want to introduce a new product to your customers, don’t just focus on the sales language and imagery. Personalize the conversation by telling us the name of the model. Let us see how the product is going to work for us by telling us about the environment where the images were taken, the models, using the product, how they’re interacting with the product. The more your communications can humanize your products and services, the more the humans you’re advertising to will want your products and services.

Joey Coleman (11:40):
There are so many great customer experience articles to read, but who has the time?! We summarize them and offer clear takeaways you can implement starting tomorrow. Enjoy this segment of CX Press, where we read the articles so you don’t need to!

Joey Coleman (11:59):
You’ve had the opportunity to speak for the fine folks at Podium – didn’t you, at some point in the past?

Dan Gingiss (12:05):
I did and in fact, I’m still doing so – they are a client of mine now and, uh, really liked those guys. I like working with them…

Joey Coleman (12:12):
They are fantastic folks. I had the pleasure of speaking to the Podium team as well last year. Uh, but to be clear, the story that we’re about to talk about is not a sponsored segment. In fact, Podium has no idea. We’re recording this conversation right now. Dan, you had no idea before we started recording tonight that we were going to be recording about this, but I had the chance to read their brand new 2021 State of Reviews Report. And to be honest, it was so full of actionable insights and just really eye opening observations that I wanted to share it with our listeners. Now, for context, if you haven’t heard of podium before podium is a fast growing software company that specializes in customer interactions. Now they call their solution, the “ultimate messaging platform,” because it allows for multi-channel communications to funnel into a single location. So you can text with your customers, connect with your website traffic, request and comment on reviews, collect payments. You can do so much more all in one software solution. Now I came to know of podium for their expertise in helping local businesses do more, to get reviews and then use those reviews to grow their business, which is why I was so curious about their findings in the 2021 State of Reviews Report.

Dan Gingiss (13:28):
Yeah, it’s obviously a fascinating and sometimes terrifying part of running a business, right? Is this whole thing around reviews. When do you ask for them, how do you ask for them? What do you do about them? Do you respond some sites? Don’t let you respond at all. What if they’re anonymous? What if people are complaining about you? These are things that keep small business owners up at night so it’s a very important topic.

Joey Coleman (13:55):
Absolutely. And you know, it’s interesting because I think it’s one of those topics, Dan, that everyone knows it’s important, but it’s kind of hard to know where to dive in, but there are so many moving parts to this, and that’s why I loved this report. So the 2021 State of Reviews rReport starts out with the following observation, which I found pretty profound, quote “Reviews have never been so important or influential. In the wake of COVID-19 the information they provide and customer experience they paint are closely and regularly analyzed by consumers. In our digital marketplace reviews are the first link to connecting with your business and the first deciding factor in moving to a competitor. To stay competitive businesses must proactively remove any obstacles that prevent customers from leaving reviews.” Now, the report goes on to share the findings of a survey that they did in October of 2020, across a US audience that included 1,543 consumers (aged 18 to 99, in all regions of the country) 455 small business owners or managers, and 378 enterprise business leaders in businesses with a local presence. Now let’s talk about a few of the interesting statistics that we found in the review. Dan, do you want to share one that you liked?

Dan Gingiss (15:15):
Sure. Well, the top characteristics that consumers say are most important when choosing a local business: Location is number one at 61%, Price or Promotions at 55%. And then we get into some interesting pieces: Personal recommendations at 50%, and Reviews at 41%.

Joey Coleman (15:36):
You know, I thought that one was really interesting, Dan, because when we think of a local business location, location, location, right, that’s pretty obvious price. Hello, die. Everybody knows about that personal recommendations. If you can get word of mouth, of course, but coming in, in the strong fourth place with double digit 41% reviews, I was somewhat surprised to see it that high in the list. But I wasn’t surprised when I learned the next statistic, which was 65% of consumers have read a review of some product or service in the last week. And 85% have read a review in the last month. People are reading reviews like crazy left and right, and that’s contributing to their buying decisions.

Dan Gingiss (16:22):
It makes sense. And 58% of consumers are willing to travel further and pay more to patronize a business with higher reviews. And this actually happened the other night was my daughter’s 13th birthday. She asked for sushi and she found, online, a new sushi place that we hadn’t been to. That was frankly, a little bit farther away than normal, but it got terrific reviews. And that’s why we tried it. And guess what? We loved it and we’re going to go back.

Joey Coleman (16:47):
I love it. I love it. Now here’s the question, Dan, have you written a review?

Dan Gingiss (16:52):
Great question. I have not. I probably should.

Joey Coleman (16:55):
Okay. If you haven’t because it illustrates the point. Here’s the crazy thing. 81% of consumers leave a review four times a year or less. So the majority of people, if they are going to do a review are going to do no more than four in a year, which means super reviewers are really rare. 20% of people say they have never left a review, in any capacity, for any product or service. Now I know from our conversations, you’ve left plenty of reviews over the years. But what I think was interesting about this statistic is what can we do to get people who like you had a great experience to actually write about the fact that you went further than you normally would, that you went for a special occasion, right? That you were doing this effort to go above and beyond because you wanted to try a new place and how it really paid off because of the reviews.

Dan Gingiss (17:47):
Well, and just to stay on that story, I’ll tell you exactly how they should have done it. They, I called in the order. So they had my name and phone number. And when I went to pick it up, I told them it was my first time being there. And she asked me where I lived and she said, Oh, you drove a little ways to get here. I said, yeah, they, all they had to do was call me half an hour later and say, Hey, how was your dinner? And ask me to write a review. And I, boom, I would have done it immediately.

Joey Coleman (18:10):
Or my gut instinct is you gave them your cell phone number. They could have even texted. You could have texted them interestingly enough – and this is a plug for our friends at Podium. I guess they have a texting solution that allows you to solve for that problem. But this kind of illustrates the point you were making earlier that we’ve got to know when to ask for the reviews and we have to actually do the ask. It’s not enough just to have a great product. We need to remind people that we made a promise of a great product we delivered on that product. And part of the payment that they can give back to us is to write a review.

Dan Gingiss (18:44):
Yeah. And one of the things I learned in corporate America was find that place where, you know, you make your customers happy and that’s when you ask them. So when I worked at discover, what we realized was the moment they were happiest with us was when customers redeemed their rewards, because it was like getting free money and who doesn’t like free money. So we learned that that was the moment to ask for a review because they thought they thought we were awesome. Right? And so we didn’t put on the website, leave us a review in 70 different places. We put it in the places where we knew that they were in, that customers were in a good mood and really happy with us. Right. And it worked, it, it it’s, you know, if you hit them at the right time, especially local businesses. And I think so many people now we feel for local businesses, we want to support them. And if a review helps you do have to make the because it’s not that I meant to not leave a review of this place. I just never thought about it.

Joey Coleman (19:39):
Right. And you got caught up with other things you had ordered dinner. I presume you were driving all the way back home to then sit down and have sushi dinner with the family. So what’s interesting is the report actually speaks to this. They noted that after having a good experience with a local business, consumers are 12% more likely to leave a review if they saw a sign asking them to in the business establishment, and 36% more likely if they receive an email invite to leave a review. Now, I’m not sure if there was anything in the research that talked about getting a text message to leave a review, but I bet that’s even higher, especially in like a takeout scenario like this, where if I could just click, Hey, I’ll give you five stars. Boom, they’ve got the review, which led to another interesting stat that was in the reports, which is 86% of consumers require at least a three-star average rating in order to even consider engaging with your business with 3.4 being the average star rating required. So if your business doesn’t have 3.4 stars out of five, they’re not even going to consider you. You’ve got to get that up in the four and five range.

Dan Gingiss (20:46):
Yeah. Would say personally, mine, my limit is usually a four.

Joey Coleman (20:51):
You have a higher threshold for awesomeness.

Dan Gingiss (20:53):
Exactly – or for pain – I don’t know. I know there are another related statistic here, which you and I have talked about before is that 68% of consumers agree or somewhat agree that they don’t trust a high review rating unless there’s also a high quality of reviews. And we’ve talked about this. I think I mentioned in a previous episode, how happy I was to get my first three star review on Amazon for my book, because everything up until then had been five stars. And it isn’t believable. I mean, even though they were all real people don’t believe that any product or services is exactly five stars. And so that one, three star review brought me down to like, uh, you know, whatever it is at 4.8, 4.9 and now it’s realistic.

Joey Coleman (21:35):
Absolutely. You know, it’s so funny. Dan years ago, a friend of mine had written a book and he had asked me to do a review and I knew how reviews worked. And I went on Amazon to see, and he had like twenty 5 star reviews. So I decided to write a four star review and I wrote the review and I made the lack of the fifth star. I called out why I wasn’t giving it a fifth star. And it was some benign reason like, Oh, I wish there would have been three more chapters. You know, something that anybody who is actually reading a review, it’d be like, Oh, just get over yourself. Give them the five stars. But when my friend, when we talked about it, he’s like, Oh, why didn’t you give me the four star? I was like, I give you the four star to help you. I’m not hurting you with the forced arm actually helping you. So I do think that it’s one of those things where we don’t want to always strive for just the five star reviews. Interestingly enough, one of the things that they also found in the study is that how you comment on reviews like negative reviews is really important. So there’s an encouragement there for any business that has reviews comment on the reviews. If at all possible. Now I get in some formats, you can’t do that. And in some platforms where reviews are left, but if you get the chance to actually comment, thank them for the review, acknowledged the review. If something has gone wrong, explain why it went wrong. Don’t get defensive, but either just genuinely apologize or point out some additional facts that might’ve been left out of the review, your customers and your prospects who have never done business with you are less crazy than the people who write one-star reviews and they will read through and become advocates for you.

Dan Gingiss (23:15):
Absolutely. And this is why we to ask for reviews of the ExperienceThisShow at the end of every episode. And here’s what we know from our friends at podium, even though we’ve been asking only a small percentage of listeners actually write reviews. So we want to make that easier for you.

Joey Coleman (23:32):
So we came across this interesting new service called love the podcast. Okay? So you have to participate. All you have to do is visit LoveThePodcast.com/ExperienceThis. And what it will do is it will identify what platform you’re on, either Apple or Android, and it will give you an easy way to leave a review for our show in the platform that best suits your needs. I know lots of times we talk about leaving a review on iTunes. This will, with some technology, figure out the best places for you to leave reviews. And if you do leave a review, please make sure to let us know so we can appreciate your review and all sorts of fun and creative ways.

Joey Coleman (24:15):
Almost everyone has interacted with chatbots, but all too often, it’s been a bad experience. In MythBusters – presented by Solvvy – we explore a common myth about CX chatbots and see how the right technology can create a positive experience every time.

Joey Coleman (24:40):
Today’s myth about chatbots? Chatbots are glorified search engines. Allow me to explain. Straightforward questions should have straightforward answers correct? So why is it that so many chatbots respond to straightforward, basic customer questions by providing a list of helpful links or perhaps a massive article that takes 10 minutes to scroll through, just to find the one piece of information that you actually need. I’m not sure about you, Dan, but when this happens, I wind up asking to talk to an agent or I submit a support ticket. So I don’t have to waste my time with the chat bot.

Dan Gingiss (25:16):
Yeah, I hear you Joey, but while there’s a myth that chatbots are glorified search engines, the reality is that intelligent chatbots provide specific answers and use images, videos, and even interactive tools to provide customers with great support. For example, let’s say a product you purchased, isn’t working the way you hoped you bought some ski pants for example, and they don’t fit! If you visited a company’s online help center, an intelligent chat bot is able to ask short questions to help narrow down your problem and effectively troubleshoot the issue instead of displaying a bunch of random links or just copy of the manual that came with the product, which you probably have anyway, the chat bot shares the specific instructions or videos that you need to resolve the problem with a next gen chat bot. Common questions do have straightforward answers.

Joey Coleman (26:05):
That sounds like such a better customer experience. It’s about time that the technology provided straightforward answers to straightforward questions. We’ll learn more about advances in chat bots and support automation throughout the season.

Dan Gingiss (26:20):
And that’s another myth busted – thanks to our friends at Solvvy, the Next Gen Chatbot.

Joey Coleman (26:27):
We love telling stories and sharing key insights you can implement, or avoid, based on our experiences. Can you believe that This Just Happened!

Joey Coleman (26:41):
As our loyal listeners probably remember, when it comes to the co-hosts of the Experience This Show, Dan is by far the better of the two of us when it comes to things like pinball, Chicago Cubs fandom, Twitter, and cooking.

Dan Gingiss (26:56):
Oh, well, hey, thanks man, pat me on the back! I really appreciate all the fine compliments. Uh, you’re definitely better when it comes to hair. I would say definitely a better singer. I would say for sure.

Joey Coleman (27:11):
No, no, not!

Dan Gingiss (27:11):
A better LEGO builder absolutely. Uh, but hey, I’m glad you called out cooking because I do love cooking and I am proud to say that I cook for my kids multiple times a week, usually at least four times a week and I have so much fun doing it. Now I’ve got them involved in it too.

Joey Coleman (27:28):
And you cook for teenagers and they eat what you cook, which is pretty impressive Dan! It shows that you

Dan Gingiss (27:33):
They do eat a lot of what I cook!

Joey Coleman (27:34):
They eat a lot of what you cook. I love it! So here’s the thing, I’ve got to confess, as we start out a new year, I’ve been considering some enhancements in my personal life. And one of those areas is to potentially improve my culinary skills. So I actually helped to make dinner tonight before we recorded this episode.

Dan Gingiss (27:54):
Really? Now I know your wife Berit is quite a good cook, so what was on the menu tonight?

Joey Coleman (27:59):
Yes. Berit is definitely the better cook in the family. She is normally the one providing all of the meals, which I so greatly appreciate. But tonight I thought I would start with pasta in boiling water.

Dan Gingiss (28:10):
Wow Joey! You’re like next stop, Top Chef right?

Joey Coleman (28:17):
And I can feel it coming well, no, I let’s be candid folks. We got to start somewhere. Right. But I have a question for you, Dan. How do you know when the spaghetti is ready?

Dan Gingiss (28:28):
The spaghetti is ready? Uh, well, uh, you know, usually I asked my friend a L E X a to set a timer for me, but if I forget, I kind of have to do the old, like tasted, burned my hand on the hot pasta if it’s too crunchy, put it back in. Okay.

Joey Coleman (28:44):
All right. So either the timer or the taste method, I also know this, throw it against the wall method. I’ve heard about, I’ve heard about the cut it in half method, which some people swear by, some people think that ruins the entire meal, but I tonight actually had some additional help in the kitchen that went beyond any of these techniques. I had some help from the fine folks at Barilla.

Dan Gingiss (29:09):
Barilla, like the Italian pasta company?

Joey Coleman (29:12):
Yes. And they helped me with music.

Dan Gingiss (29:17):
Music? I’m not sure I understand.

Joey Coleman (29:20):
Well, here’s the thing… A few weeks ago, a series of custom playlist appeared on Spotify. So let me play you a little sample:

Barilla Narrator (29:27):
[Italian well wishes…] [Inaudible].

Dan Gingiss (29:39):
Wow. Well, I didn’t really understand that, but I think the speaker was speaking Italian. What was being said there?

Joey Coleman (29:48):
Yeah – I have no idea. I agree. It was Italian and I don’t know what the speaker was saying, but here’s what I do know is that that clip came from the Mixtape Spaghetti playlist.

Dan Gingiss (29:59):
Of course it did!

Joey Coleman (29:59):
Play last mix tape spaghetti, right? This playlist is nine minutes and three seconds long. And if you start playing the playlist, when you add the spaghetti to the boiling water, when the last song ends on the playlist, you know, it’s time to remove the spaghetti and it will be cooked perfectly.

Dan Gingiss (30:18):
Nine minutes and three seconds.

Joey Coleman (30:20):
And three second!

Dan Gingiss (30:21):
I’ve never waited that three seconds.

Joey Coleman (30:27):
And there you go.

Dan Gingiss (30:28):
I love that. That is a kind of a fun way to it’s better than just a timer, tick, tick ticking, or, or the silence that you hear when you ask for a timer on your phone or your A-L-E-X-A. That was fun!

Joey Coleman (30:40):
Absolutely. And let’s be candid if you’re into pastas other than spaghetti, don’t worry. Barilla’s got you covered. In addition to Mixtape Spaghetti, you can listen to the Boom Bap Fusili, the Pleasant Melancholy Penne, the Moody Day Linguine, Top Hits Spaghetti, Best Song Penne, Timeless Emotion Fusili, and Simply Classics Linguini. All of those have their own playlist in short, there’s a musical playlist for pretty much every variety of pasta you might hope to cook.

Dan Gingiss (31:13):
I love that. And I, I would assume that sometimes you have to cook different pastas for different lengths. So I assume that

Joey Coleman (31:19):
Play this role different way.

Dan Gingiss (31:22):
Cool. It kind of reminds me, uh, you know, somewhat recently we were talking about, uh, the LEGO white noise music that you played for me.

Joey Coleman (31:30):
Uh, yes Dan, that would be Episode 121.

Dan Gingiss (31:34):
Aay! Look at you!

Joey Coleman (31:39):
Yeah, two episodes ago – this is not a huge stretch friends, but yeah, this whole idea of products that are going to be in people’s homes, providing a soundtrack for the product. So what can we learn from the creative folks at Barilla? Well, part of the customer experience is what happens when a customer is using your product or service and you’re not in the room with them to make sure it goes well. For years, companies have printed recommended cook times on the box of pasta that sometimes are read and followed, but most times aren’t by creating a Spotify playlist, Barilla is bringing some fun and entertainment to the kitchen. They know you might be listening to music while you cook. So why not let the music be part of the cooking experience. Now Dan and I realize you may not be in the business of making pasta and the playlist may not enhance your customer’s experience, but it does beg the question: what can you do to help your customer succeed when using your product or service? And how can you be creative in a way that lets them comply your instructions, even when you’re not in the room and thus get the full benefit of choosing to do business with you. Bon Appetito!

Joey Coleman (32:48):
Thanks for joining us for another episode of Experience This! You are the best listener ever!

Dan Gingiss (32:58):
And since you listened to the whole show…

Joey Coleman (33:01):
Yay you!

Dan Gingiss (33:02):
We’re curious… Was there a specific part of this episode that you enjoyed the most? If so, it would mean the world to us if you could share it with a coworker, a friend, or someone that just loves listening to podcasts.

Joey Coleman (33:12):
And while you’re in the sharing mood, if you felt inclined to jump over to iTunes – or wherever you find your podcasts – and write us a review, we would so appreciate it. And when you do, don’t forget to let us know as we might have a little surprise for you.

Dan Gingiss (33:28):
Thanks again for your time and we’ll see you next week for more.

Joey Coleman (33:31):
Experience

Dan Gingiss (33:33):
This!