Episode 118 – I’ll Believe It When I See It

Join us as we discuss encouraging your customers to do business with your competitors, using visuals to connect at every step in the customer journey, and watching how brands behave when they don’t know they are being watched.

Valuing, Videoing, and Voyeuring – Oh My!

[Redesign the Experience] Burger King Wants You to Order a Big Mac

Things We Mentioned in This Segment:

• “Burger King urges customers to order food from McDonald’s, Subway and KFC instead” – Gloucestershire Live Website
• Burger King UK
McDonalds UK
Discover
Humana

[Book Report] The Visual Sale by Marcus Sheridan and Tyler Lessard

Things We Mentioned in This Segment:

• Marcus Sheridan
• The Visual Sale: How to Use Video to Explode Sales, Drive Marketing, and Grow Your Business in a Virtual World – by Marcus Sheridan and Tyler Lassard
• Tyler Lessard
• They Ask, You Answer – by Marcus Sheridan

[Partnership with Avtex] Neen James, Shep Hyken, and Rohit Bhargava – Three of a Kind!

Things We Mentioned in This Segment:

• Experience Points – presented by Avtex
• Neen James
• Shep Hyken
• Rohit Bhargava
• Jay Baer
• Scott McKain
• Marquessa Pettway
• Amanda Kwok
• Jesse Cole

[This Just Happened] What to Do When Your Customers Are Watching You?!

• Kind Delivery Driver Shovels Snow (captured on Ring)
• FedEx
• UPS
• US Postal Service (USPS)
• Ring – doorbell camera
• Delivery Driver Dance on TikTok
• Amazon

Host Contact Information

Email Dan: Dan@dangingiss.com

Tweet Dan Gingiss: @DGingiss

Email Joey: JoeyC@JoeyColeman.com

DanGingiss.com

JoeyColeman.com

Subscribe to Experience This on Apple Podcasts

Episode Transcript

Download an unedited transcript of Episode 118 here or read it below:

[SHOW INTRO]
Dan Gingiss (00:05):
Welcome to Experience This!

Joey Coleman (00:08):
Where you’ll find inspiring examples of customer experience, great stories of customer service, and tips on how to make your customers love you even more!

Dan Gingiss (00:17):
Always upbeat and definitely entertaining customer attention expert, Joey Coleman.

Joey Coleman (00:23):
and social media expert, Dan Gingiss, serve as your host for a weekly dose of positive customer experience.

Dan Gingiss (00:31):
So hold on to your headphones, it’s time to Experience This!

[EPISODE 118 INTRO]
Joey Coleman (00:38):
Get ready for another episode of the Experience This! Show!

Dan Gingiss (00:44):
Join us as we discuss: encouraging your customers to do business with your competitors, using visuals to connect at every step in the customer journey, and watching how brands behave when they don’t know they’re being watched.

Joey Coleman (01:00):
Valuing, videoing, and voyeuring – oh my!

[SEGMENT INTRO – REDESIGN THE EXPERIENCE]
Joey Coleman (01:08):
With a pandemic, sweeping the globe and shifting the way organizations interact with their customers. Many of the old ways of operating just don’t work anymore. As we all navigate a COVID 19 world, it’s time to Redesign the Experience

[REDESIGN THE EXPERIENCE][Burger King Wants You to Eat a Big Mac]
Joey Coleman (01:27):
Through years of eating at restaurants, taking advantage of the drive-thru when I was on a road trip, or even just indulging myself with takeout on a night that I didn’t feel I had the time – or the desire – to cook dinner, I saw something the other day that not only stopped me in my tracks, but I thought that you would find it particularly interesting Dan, due to your past career with McDonald’s.

Dan Gingiss (01:50):
Well, you definitely have my attention, sir. What did you see this time?

Joey Coleman (01:56):
Well, I came across an article on the Gloucestershire Live website.

Dan Gingiss (02:04):
Woah!

Joey Coleman (02:04):
I wondered if I could catch you with that one!

Dan Gingiss (02:06):
The Gloucestershire Live website? Pray tell what is that?

Joey Coleman (02:11):
Yeah. So basically it came up in my newsfeed and I clicked through to read the story, and I must confess I’m not a regular reader of the Gloucestershire website. And I think I’m saying that properly, so correct me if I’m wrong our friends in the UK, but the story I saw was about a statement released by Burger King in the United Kingdom, on the Eve of their most recent lockdown due to COVID-19. And the statement read as follows that I’m directly quoting their release:

Joey Coleman (02:39):
“Order from McDonald’s. We never thought we’d be asking you to do this. Just like we never thought we’d be encouraging you to order from KFC, Subway, Domino’s Pizza, Pizza Hut, Five Guys, Greg’s, Taco Bell, Papa John’s, Leon, or any of the other independent food outlets, too numerous to mention here. In short, from any of our sister food chains – fast, or not so fast. We never thought we’d be asking you to do this, but restaurants, employing thousands of staff really need your support at this moment. So if you want to help, keep treating yourself to tasty meals through home delivery, takeaway, or drive through. Getting a Whopper is always best, but ordering a Big Mac is also not such a bad thing. Take care. Team Burger King, UK.

Dan Gingiss (03:32):
Wow man. I got, like, a tear in my eye.

Joey Coleman (03:36):
I mean, talk about in the world of press releases. Like how many press releases are written every day that no one reads because they are boring and drivel, and just, you know, feel like they were written by a robot that had zero empathy. But this one, I was like, wow, this is it. That’s pulling the heart. You know, “all the feels” as the kids say, right? Yeah.

Dan Gingiss (03:58):
Well, and this was also posted in social media all over the place, uh, went viral and uh, I actually not only saw the original post, but they ended up adding more of their local competitors in a comment underneath it because I think some people responded and they said, Hey, don’t forget about this one or this one. And they started naming all these hamburger places I’ve never heard of before. But so I’m just assuming that they’re UK places. But I think obviously the sentiment is really cool. I, one of the things that I learned at McDonald’s it’s the first and only time that I worked for a leader brand L E a D E R brand, as opposed to a follower brand, you know, Discover, Humana there. Those are follower brands that are not the largest in their market. And the thing is, is that basically when you’re the leader brand, it actually tends to limit your flexibility in terms of doing creative things like this, because everyone’s chasing you and waiting for you to make a mistake. And so what ended up happening certainly at McDonald’s was it, there was just this very conservative protectionism of the brand that they would have never done something like this. Whereas

Joey Coleman (05:11):
Yeah, I think it’s, it’s hard to be creative if you, when you’re the 900 pound gorilla in the room.

Dan Gingiss (05:17):
Yeah. And I think burger King, what’s cool about this is what do they have to lose to do this? I mean, it’s certainly ambitious. It’s different unique. It got people talking. And my hope for them is that it lifted their brand. I mean, that’s the, as the marketer in me, that’s the only thing I would worry about is like, man, you just listed every one of your competitors. Let’s make sure people remember that this is a Burger King ad, but from all the press this got, I think they did.

Joey Coleman (05:44):
Absolutely. And here’s the thing your customers know who your competitors are. Okay. Burger King, like Burger King, doesn’t really need to worry about, geez, we listed Papa John’s in that press release. I everybody’s got, they already knew Papa John’s existed. Right. And so I think this idea of acknowledging the reality is really important. I know we’ve talked about it in past episodes, but it’s like if you go into a store and you’re traveling and you’re like, Hey, I need to get a, a car adapter for my phone or a car charger for my phone. And they’re like, Oh, we don’t have that in this store. When I say, “well, do you know anywhere nearby that might have one?” it doesn’t hurt your brand to be honest and say, actually, there’s another, you know, cell phone store, two blocks away that might, it helps your brand because you’ve helped me solve a problem. And I think the reality here is the folks at Team Burger King in the UK have realized that they have a huge problem. And the huge problem may have is people are not eating out anymore. They are not going to restaurants. And a lot of people are scared to even do take out or drive through at the restaurants. And so by saying, Hey, whether it’s us or at one of our competitors, we kind of don’t care. Just keep going to restaurants because they want to condition the behavior. What we’re already seeing across a lot of different industries is that the COVID 19 pandemic experience is changing behaviors, at a human level, much faster than we’ve ever experienced before. I mean, you have plenty of people in the medical world that would have told you that telemedicine was 20 years away. Well, not until 2020, because now it’s right now, everybody wants telemedicine. You had plenty of people in the education world saying, well, there’s no way we could do virtual schooling for elementary school students. And yet almost every school in the United States, and in many countries around the world, has at least experimented with some level of virtual schooling over the course of the last few months. And so I think the reality is when your category is suffering, when your entire part in the marketplace is suffering, you know, drastic times call for drastic measures.

Dan Gingiss (08:04):
Well, yeah and also I would say that more generally and not pandemic specific is burger King understands that just because someone is a burger King customer, does it mean that burger King is the only restaurant that they ever go-to ever? I mean, in fact, most of the time, that’s not true. I remember, uh, I think we may have talked about this once before, but I, uh, I had an ill-fated experience of buying a restaurant franchise that never ended up opening. [inaudible]

Joey Coleman (08:37):
I don’t think I’ve ever heard this story, ladies and gentlemen, we’ll put a pin in this for next season. This is brand new to me. Right?

Dan Gingiss (08:45):
In any event, one of the goals that I had, this was in downtown Chicago ,was just getting onto people’s rotations because you have all these people that work in the city and they go out to lunch day and I knew they weren’t going to come to my place every day. I couldn’t expect them to come five days a week, but man, if I could get them once a week, that was huge because, and then the next day they’re going to go to my competitor. And the day after that, they’re going to go to a different competitor. But if I could get them once a week, that would make my business. So burger King understands that. And like you said, they understand that it’s not like we’re sharing some secret that McDonald’s is our competitor. Like people already know that.

Joey Coleman (09:22):
Absolutely. And I think at the end of the day, what we need more of in business is the acknowledgement of the reality. Let’s stop pretending that the customer is just foolish, that they’re just blind to the realities of life. You know, your customer is shopping at your competitors as well. I don’t care what industry you’re in. I don’t care what brand you’re is. They have sampled the goods elsewhere. Okay. Now they’ve decided to come with you, but to your point in the restaurant industry, they’re not coming every day and that’s okay. You probably don’t want them coming to your restaurant every day, right? That’s a different subset of customer that you have to,

Dan Gingiss (10:02):
They made a movie about that, where the guy went to McDonald’s every day didn’t turn out very well for him, not so well. So,

Joey Coleman (10:07):
Well, I think at the end of the day, we need to realize that getting our customers to make purchases in our category is almost as important as getting them to make purchases from us. Or at least it’s a close second. And I think the other thing that we want to recognize is that the times are changing. And if you don’t start to acknowledge that reality, you’re missing the point. So what can we learn from this story and Burger King UK encouraging their customers to, Oh, give money to the competition? Well, we can learn this COVID-19 has caused incredible stress in the lives of people around the world, from our health to our habits, the massive changes we’ve experienced over the last nine to 10 months have impacted all of us in obvious and not so obvious ways. And the reality is that dozens of industries are struggling, not just individual businesses, I’m talking about entire industries. And when an industry is struggling as is the case with the restaurant industry, for example, it’s not about saving a specific location, or a specific store, specific branch, we all need to think broader about what we can do to save an entire industry. By doing something small, like picking up takeout or spreading the love across several different restaurants, instead of just your signature, favorite place to eat, we can all play a role in keeping things moving forward. So consider what you’re going to do to help your industry navigate this pandemic era, consider what you’re going to do to help grow your industry, not just your specific business. And as you think about your meal planning over the holidays, consider picking up some takeout from your favorite restaurant and bring it home to your family. Not only will you feed your loved ones in a safe and healthy way, but you’ll contribute to feeding those restaurant employees. And in fact, the entire restaurant industry with your patronage.

[SEGMENT INTRO – BOOK REPORT]
Joey Coleman (12:10):
We’re excited to give you an overview of an important book you should know about as well as share some of our favorite passages as part of our next Book Report.

[BOOK REPORT][The Visual Sale by Marcus Sheridan and Tyler Lessard]
Joey Coleman (12:22):
Dan, as we wrap up 2020 and think about the future of customer communications, do you think businesses and organizations will need to use more or less video?

Dan Gingiss (12:34):
Well, you know, it pains me to say this, but I do believe that the answer is obviously more and it pains me because, uh, I radically for a guy that loves podcasting, and loves being on stage, I’m still not very comfortable on video. And you know, my mom will tell you, even as a kid, I never liked my picture getting taken. And it’s still not very comfortable for me, but I do think for companies and for brands, it’s a must-have.

Joey Coleman (13:01):
Yeah. And I didn’t think for a minute that Mrs. Gingiss was going to say you had a face for radio. Okay. So don’t worry. I was not thinking that!

Dan Gingiss (13:09):
I’m sure you weren’t thinking that ever!

Joey Coleman (13:11):
I appreciate that. And I think it’s one of those things where it’s kind of like flossing, everybody knows they should be doing it, but that step of getting from not doing it to starting to doing it, to doing it regularly, feels like a big leap for…

Dan Gingiss (13:25):
Doing it well…

Joey Coleman (13:26):
and doing it well, right.

Dan Gingiss (13:28):
Because even regularly doesn’t necessarily get you there.

Joey Coleman (13:30):
Totally, totally. Which is why I’m super excited to share the newest book by our mutual friend, Marcus Sheridan, as part of this episode’s Book Report.

Dan Gingiss (13:42):
Okay. So you and I both love Marcus. Can’t say enough about him. I joke with him that I’ve sold more copies of his book. They ask you answer than of my own books because I’ve recommended it and bought it for so many people. And he is also, and I say this with great respect, even to you, my friend, Joey, cause you know, I’ve heard this before. I’ve said this before he is my single favorite speaker, the closing keynote that he did at Social Media Marketing World. And I think 2017 was still to this day, the best keynote I’ve ever seen. And that’s saying a lot, I’ve been, I’ve been to a lot of keynotes.

Joey Coleman (14:23):
I totally, I totally agree with you. World-class I have, I was not in the room for that keynote. And I’ve heard about that keynote from dozens of people. Yeah. Marcus is a gem. When Marcus talks you should listen, which is ironic because our loyal listeners will remember. We shared Marcus’ work before, when we talked about his first book, They Ask, You Answer.

Dan Gingiss (14:45):
And that of course would be back all the way in season one, episode four, for those keeping score at home.

Joey Coleman (14:52):
Well, you really had to go back into the archives for that one rain man. I love it. Well, yes, it has been a while since we’ve shared, Marcus’ writing with our listeners, but frankly, any time Marcus put something down on paper, I want to read it. And so when he published this new book, I was all over it. In fact, I pre-ordered my copy of the book before it was even published. So I could dive in the day it was released. And I devoured this book. The book is titled, “The Visual Sale: How to Use Video to Explode Sales, Drive Marketing, and Grow Your Business in a Virtual World. Now I realize it’s a bit of a brain twister to think about reading a book about videos, but the reality is most business owners. I talk to know that they need to be doing more with video, but they aren’t exactly sure how to create a culture of video within their organization, which is why I absolutely love Marcus’s message. Now, before I steal too much of his thunder, here’s Marcus giving us an overview of his new book.

Marcus Sheridan (15:54):
I am Marcus Sheridan, one of the authors of the book, along with Tyler Lasara and here’s the thing my friends we know at this point, at least certainly most of us that as organizations and businesses, if we want to be successful in 2021 and beyond, we must show it. Can’t just tell it. We’ve got to show it. So we’ve got all these companies around the world that are looking to create a culture of video and do video and be more effective with video. And the thing about it is there’s a lot of books out there that talk about how you can be a blogger and how you can build your brand with video, but they don’t speak to businesses and organizations. And certainly they don’t come from a perspective of sales first marketing second. And that’s one of the big points to the book. We’re going to start with videos that actually get results. The types of videos, starting with sales, like videos that your sales team will truly get excited about integrating enter their sales process. And then of course the marketing videos, types of videos that are going to get you the most revolt results in terms of traffic leads and ultimately sales. We want to also show you in this work, other companies that have done this incredibly well. So we’re going to share with you multiple B to B and B to C case studies. So you can see yourself and these businesses realize that no, you’re not the exception that yes, video absolutely does apply to you regardless of what you sell B to B, B to C service, big, small, we’ve all got to get on this train that is video. And then finally, we’re going to look at in this work, how you can create a culture of video in house. And that’s such a big key because it’s one thing to outsource your video to another organization. It’s an entire different thing to in-source it, to produce your own content because the future of digital is going to be in house ownership of content. We also have a couple of bonus sections there about how to do more effective virtual events and virtual selling for your sales team, especially in a post COVID world. So if you’re looking to do amazing things with video and visual, make sure you check it out, The Visual Sale.

Dan Gingiss (18:48):
We can’t just tell it, we’ve got to show it. I love it when Marcus said that, because let’s be honest, seeing is believing. It’s always been that way. And video allows you to see the business or individual that you’re dealing with in a way that frankly, email or taxed or direct mail just can’t accomplish. And that’s why we said at the beginning here, that video is and is going to continue to be an important part of communications going forward for every business. And I think one of the things that maybe is not said here is what are we talking about video? We’re not talking about yet another television commercial. I remember very early days in Facebook, a company, you know, saying to me, Hey, we should put our TV commercials on Facebook. No, actually they didn’t want to see it on TV. Yeah. So what Marcus is talking about is genuine communication and he is, you know, the number one sales guy and, and teaching salespeople all over the world. And he’s talking about making a one-to-one connection with somebody through video, not a one-to-mass video type situation.

Joey Coleman (20:07):
Absolutely. And I think video, it just allows for such a richer narrative and a deeper narrative. And as you point out Dan, a more personalized narrative, it’s definitely the way businesses need to be moving and they need to be moving strategically that way. You know, this is one of those books that had me highlighting passage after passage to the point where I was almost like, Oh my gosh, am I going to highlight the entire book? But before we get into some of our favorite parts of the book, I think it’s only fair to let Marcus share the epiphany he had when it came to using videos to connect with customers. And he did it in an industry that let’s be honest, before Marcus, was not that well known for its use of video. Here’s what Marcus had to say:

Marcus Sheridan (20:55):
I used to be a pool guy. Wait a minute. What does a pool guy know about video? You see, for years, my job was cut and dry in ground swimming pool shoppers would call our company river pools and spas. Then in most cases I would make the long drive to their home with the intention to yes, sell them a swimming pool more often than not. When I would knock on the front door of a home for one of these calls, I’d hear a child’s voice in the background, yell at something to the effect of mom, dad, pool guys here. So that was me, just the pool guy, no name, no face just to knock on the door. But then one night after we had embraced the philosophy of what I now call the visual sale, everything changed. You see on that particular occasion, as I knocked on the door, I heard a child in the background say, mom, dad, the guy on the video is here. And eyebrow immediately raised the child, knew my face. It wasn’t just another pool guy. I was more than that, much more, but the story doesn’t stop there a year or so later at the end of my career as a swimming pool sales guy, I had another occasion when I walked up to her front door for a sales appointment and something absolutely magical happened. Mom, dad, Marcus from the video is here. I had a name, I had a face. They knew me. It was because of this experience. My eyes were opened to a definitive reality – the visual sale is real.

Dan Gingiss (22:33):
I love this concept of video creating a connection before you ever get to meet in person with your customer. And man, have we seen a lot of that in 2020, right? Where we’ve had to be virtual. And uh, and you know, I said before that I don’t love video. And it’s kind of funny to say that in 2020, because heck I’ve spent my whole darn year on video. And so have we all. And I think what we can take away from that is that we’re all probably better at this video stuff than we think we are. And we now know what it’s like to try to get to know someone and establish a connection and establish a relationship when you’re not in the same room with them. And we should be able to carry those learnings even into a future where hopefully not everything has to be virtual. So Joey, there were a lot of things that I liked about this book and it’s obviously chock full of tips and strategies and case studies for using video in marketing and sales activities. But that being said, I wanted to share a passage that is more specifically dealing with using video to create remarkable customer experiences after the sale. So from book, and I quote:

Dan Gingiss (23:47):
One of the easiest ways to delight customers is to use authentic video content, to break down the digital divide between the people within your respective organizations, the more familiar they are with the real people across your teams, the more connected they’ll feel to your brand. And the more likely they are to go to bat for you. If a customer has a dedicated account manager, chances are they’ve met them in person or via video conferencing, but what about the scores of others across different teams who also contribute to their success? The passionate exacts, the dedicated developers to heroic service reps and even the amazing accountant who is trying to make their procurement process as seamless as possible. There are numerous ways to get your people on camera, to introduce themselves to new accounts, much like creating micro demos for your products. You can also create micro intros for people across your company that can be used in different ways as needed.

Joey Coleman (24:40):
Oh, I love that passage, Dan, you know that whole idea, micro demos. I’ve, I’ve seen those, Oh, so many different companies in so many different ways. And I think that’s how the majority of companies today that are using video and are using a lot of video, think about it. They think about using video as part of the marketing process or the sales process. What Marcus is encouraging us to do is to go beyond the sale, go beyond when we’re in the actual relationship in those first hundred days, we talk about how can you incorporate video? So I absolutely love it. You know, one of the things I particularly loved about this book, Dan is it has so many case studies that beautifully show… see, see what I did there?!

Dan Gingiss (25:24):
Yeah. Okay. I get it. A book on video that shows.

Joey Coleman (25:28):
Yeah. Yeah, exactly. Okay. Well, one of the companies that is profiled in the book, uh, with a case study is called lucid chart. And as Marcus explains, quote:

Joey Coleman (25:40):
Their exceptionally funny and surprisingly educational YouTube series called lucid chart explains the internet offers dozens of one minute videos explaining different topics, concepts, or pop culture movements in a way that is fast paced, very fun. And oddly addictive while the topic of each video has nothing to do with lucid charts products. The big reveal after 55 seconds is that the tool they used to illustrate and visualize the content in the video was none other than lucid chart. So not only did you just learn how Luke Skywalker is related to Princess Leia, you discovered a great new tool that could help your team at work, create equally awesome diagrams, and charts, and data visualizations for great collaboration. What’s more thanks to all of the sharing and fanfare lucid charts, product overview and tutorial videos have been viewed more than 1 million times.

Dan Gingiss (26:40):
Wowzers! And of course I knew you would find the Star Wars example in the book Joey. Right.

Joey Coleman (26:45):
Very true.

Dan Gingiss (26:45):
It is indeed a great case study for how to showcase a product without making it feel like a sales pitch.

Joey Coleman (26:52):
So true. I so agree with you, Dan, and yes, if you get the chance friends go to YouTube search lucid chart, explain Star Wars, and you can see the great example that Marcus referenced in that quote. And by the way, we’ll also link to it in the show notes at ExperienceThisShow.com. So here’s the scoop. You may be using video now, or you may not, but for sure you will need to be using it more in the future. Get ahead of the competition, avoid making beginner mistakes and learn how to create a culture of video within your organization. By picking up a copy of The Visual Sale: How to Use Video to Explode Sales, Drive Marketing, and Grow Your Business in a Virtual World. Friends, it’s a fast read. It’s an entertaining read. It’s a knowledge giving read, and it’s a book that can and should serve as a roadmap when it comes to your strategic plans for 2021. And since it’s Christmas week and I’m feeling festive, let’s just say this, we’re going to call a little audible here. Uh, the first three people to share this episode of Experience This on social media and tag me, or Dan, or both of us.

Dan Gingiss (28:00):
Uh, but if it’s Twitter, you better tag me.

Joey Coleman (28:02):
It’s so true. So true. If it’s Twitter tag, Dan hashtag Dan’s the Twitter guy. Uh, but the first three people that share this episode on social media and encourage people to check out Marcus’s book, the visual sale will get their very own signed copy of the book, courtesy of The Experience This! Show!

Dan Gingiss (28:21):
Wait a minute, what do they want? Marcus’s book signed by us for?

Joey Coleman (28:25):
No, no, no… signed by Marcus, but who knows? Maybe we’ll sell it too, but yeah, it’ll be a surprise folks. So share away and let’s help everyone. We know get better at video in 2021.

[Partnership with Avtex] Neen James, Shep Hyken, and Rohit Bhargava – Three of a Kind!
Dan Gingiss (28:44):
What do Neen James, Shep Hyken, and Rohit Bhargava have in common?

Joey Coleman (28:49):
Well, they are the only people, you know, with those first names?!

Dan Gingiss (28:56):
I see what you did there… Neen, Shep, Rohit. Yeah, actually that is definitely true.

Joey Coleman (29:01):
unique names,

Dan Gingiss (29:02):
but not what I was thinking.

Joey Coleman (29:03):
Oh, okay.

Dan Gingiss (29:04):
So they are actually the first three celebrity contestants on our new game show – Experience Points brought to you by our partners at Avtex, who transform customer experience through CX design and orchestration of

Joey Coleman (29:20):
And what fantastic contestants they were. You can see how Neen, and Shep, and Rohit did as they brought their customer experience strategies and wisdom to bear playing three games that we designed to test their knowledge in both an entertaining and fun way. And in the process, you can also see them win prize money for their favorite charity.

Dan Gingiss (29:42):
It’s the most fun you can have talking about customer experience folks. So take some time to check out the games played by our first three contestants, Neen, Shep, and Rohit, and stay tuned for more customer experience professionals like Jay Baer, Scott McCain, Marquessa Pettway, Amanda Kwok, Jesse Cole, and more in the weeks to come.

Joey Coleman (30:05):
Now you can watch episodes of experience points on YouTube. Just check out the Avtex Solutions channel or online at www.ExperiencePointsGame.com that’s ExperiencePointsGame.com.

Dan Gingiss (30:21):
You can also listen to the games on your favorite podcast app by searching for Avtex Experience Points, not to be confused with that gamer podcast called “Experience Points,” make sure to include Avtex that’s A-V-T-E-X in your search, but don’t worry. We’ll also link to it in our show notes.

Joey Coleman (30:38):
We so hope you enjoyed the show and Experience Points!

[SEGMENT INTRO – THIS JUST HAPPENED]
Joey Coleman (30:44):
We love telling stories and sharing key insights you can implement, or avoid, based on our experiences. Can you believe that This Just Happened?!

[THIS JUST HAPPENED][What To Do When Your Customers Are Watching You?!]
Dan Gingiss (30:57):
As you know Dan, I’ve just moved back to my childhood home of Fort Dodge, Iowa. And while my family is adjusting to our new setup here, my extended family that already lived here in town is adjusting to some of my habits and behaviors as well. And to be honest, the one they’ve commented on the most is how much the ups and FedEx drivers must love my family.

Dan Gingiss (31:21):
Oh my gosh. I can relate to that man every day, something else arriving at the doorstep. And I tell you, especially on the cold days, like today in Chicago, I always, if I see them, I always try to open up the door and yell out. Thank you as they’re running back to their truck because, uh, man, they do yeoman’s work. And uh, and they’re certainly filling up my doorstep as well.

Joey Coleman (31:42):
They really do. And I think as I don’t know about you, our effort to have delivery of things has dramatically increased in the COVID era. I look at it as it allows us to continue to kind of function and get the things we need in our house, but we’re not exposing other people to us or being exposed by other people when we go out. So lots of deliveries coming these days, which is actually why I wanted to talk to you about something that we’ve talked about a little bit in past episodes. And that is the experience created by your partners – in this case, fine delivery drivers at FedEx, at UPS, and the US Post Office. But specifically I wanted to talk about what the drivers are doing when no one is watching or at least they think no one is watching. This is starting to sound a little creepy, Joey. All right. Sorry about that, Dan, let me explain. Uh, I saw a video the other day of a delivery driver dropping off a package for an elderly person. And then the driver proceeded to shovel the snow off of the porch and the steps to the house. Now, to be clear, the person who lived in the house didn’t see this happening live, but they did see it later when they reviewed the video feed from their Ring cam.

Dan Gingiss (33:00):
Ahh, yes, I saw this video as well. And for those that may not know, Ring is a company that makes a video doorbell system and it allows people to record what is happening when people approach their door to ring the bell and drop off packages, et cetera. And you know, sometimes it does catch people doing things that they don’t know that it’s catching them to. And sometimes those things are things that they don’t want to be caught doing. And in this particular case, it was something that, uh, it turned out. It was very nice that someone caught this person doing.

Joey Coleman (33:34):
Yeah. I mean, there’s certainly been the, the negative videos. We’ve probably all seen the drivers throwing the package over the fence or kicking the box up onto the front steps or whatever it may be. But I know I also saw some during COVID where they had videos of drivers, you know, they had left snacks for the drivers or hand sanitizer. And I even saw one where there was like a little box that encouraged them to do a Tik TOK dance. And like when they stepped on the box, it started playing the music and you saw a bunch of drivers kind of walking around the box and then eventually a driver comes along and does it, and they’ve obviously got it all on video, which is just fascinating. When we think about this idea that drivers are being filmed in front of people’s homes when the people might not even be in the house.

Dan Gingiss (34:20):
Yeah. And it does, uh, I mean, as I mentioned, there’s a little bit of a creepiness factor to it, but it does sort of beg the question of how many opportunities do we have to maybe find out what other people are doing when they don’t think that they’re being watched. So I’m kind of thinking about employees, for example. Right, right now we trust that all of our employees are diligently working from home at their home offices and sitting at their desks all day and stuff. But yeah, we really don’t know.

Joey Coleman (34:48):
And we don’t want to obviously get too Big Brother-ish about it and that’s not why I wanted to bring up the story. But what I think is fascinating is when we recognize that we are “on all the time,” that is the delivery driver is being watched. Even if no, one’s there, it creates some opportunities for creating remarkable experiences, because if you know that person isn’t there, but you know, they have a ring cam and you do a little dance or you say a little message or you even trust wave. It creates some personal connection. Now, what I think is really interesting is if we take it one step further and this does get a little Big Brother-ish, but to be frank, it wouldn’t surprise me if this started to happen, Ring at the company that makes, uh, kind of the leader in the video solutions is owned by Amazon and Amazon has been making a big push as I’m sure you and our listeners are well aware of Dan to create their own delivery service, where they have their own airplanes, their own trucks doing the delivery. So they’re kind of weaning themselves off of FedEx and ups in the U S post office to have their own kind of independent carriers they partner with. I could see a scenario where Amazon, because they have access to the video feed from ring, started to match up the ability to see their drivers, making the deliveries and really do some quality control on the full customer experience that they can’t currently do with UPS and FedEx.

Dan Gingiss (36:24):
Well, yeah, and I, I mean, as we know today, the drivers generally take pictures of the packages and, and you can see them, uh, on your Amazon account or you get a, a text or a, uh, an alert on the app. And I think that’s a good step that, that certainly makes customers feel good. But Amazon does have a last mile problem that, that you know, is well documented that, that, you know, they control pretty much the entire experience right up until the end, because the person delivering to you is often not an Amazon employee. Now we have started to see those ubiquitous Amazon vans around our neighborhood. I don’t know if you see them around yours and I, I’m pretty sure those are Amazon employees, but I think you’re right, that this may be something where, uh, Amazon wants to, like you said, do some quality control for the part that maybe they don’t oversee now or, or can’t control in any way.

Joey Coleman (37:24):
Well, absolutely. And I think psychologists would tell us that primacy and latency theory is at play. We remember the first experience we have with a brand and the last experience we have with a brand. And one of the big challenges that Amazon has, which you allude to, is the lack of control over the last mile. The last experience that we have is with the UPS driver, or the FedEx driver, or the Post Office driver, increasingly more of the folks that are coming out of the Amazon delivery van, which is great. And, you know, we could have a whole separate conversation about the way they’ve structured that business and that business model. But the reality is Amazon has been built from day one as a company that placed high emphasis on customer experience. And I just think it’s fascinating to think about how technology merges all these things together. I know in our last episode, episode 117 – even I can remember that one friends! – we talked about AI and how AI could be used. I could see an AI sitting on top of this that was looking at deliveries and the behaviors, and maybe even starting to incentivize drivers for doing creative things, for doing more personalized things when quote unquote they’re on video to create an even more interesting or maybe even viral story.

Dan Gingiss (38:41):
Oh, for sure. And I mean, the, the, the companies that are creative about it and realize that every part of the experience is important. And what’s fascinating here is that this last mile piece is maybe among the most important parts of the experience for the actual customer, but yet the farthest away from the actual company delivering it. And so I definitely think that there are some interesting options.

Joey Coleman (39:10):
Absolutely. And let’s be candid. This isn’t just an issue for Amazon. This is an issue for every company that delivers in the e-commerce space. And as we find ourselves in the holiday season where I’m sure when it’s all said and done more deliveries will have been made in the month of December of 2020 than at any other time in FedEx or UPS or US Post Office history, the reality is more and more people are moving into delivery models and more and more people are getting cameras, whether that’s a Ring camera, security camera, even just the cam on their phone. And so there’s a lot more opportunity for these worlds to collide. So how does this apply to your business? Here’s the question? Do you have situations where your employees are participating in customer related activities that may not be seen live by the customer – but might be being filmed? Do your employees do things while wearing their uniforms or going about their daily activities that could be captured on video to either help, or hurt, your brand image? If you do, and frankly, even if you don’t, you should be talking to your employees about the way video is being used to capture and share evidence of both negative and positive experiences, and then decide what you can do to make sure your team is well-trained and prepared to deliver these remarkable experiences… even if they think no one else is watching!

[SEASON SIX CONCLUSION]
Joey Coleman (40:41):
We did it. Another season of the Experience This! Show is coming to a wrap with this, our final episode of 2020, and our concluding episode of season six.

Dan Gingiss (40:53):
What a crazy year 2020 has been – from pandemics to protests, from lockdowns to launches, from live streams to contactless delivery, to zoom calls, this year has had it all and then some!

Joey Coleman (41:07):
And season six would not have happened without the support and participation of many remarkable people, including our featured guests who submitted audio recordings to add to the conversation, our wonderful book report authors and the loyal listeners who shared their experiences for us to incorporate into our listener stories throughout the season, which we loved. And we want to have more of next season. So keep thinking about submitting those listener.

Dan Gingiss (41:34):
We also couldn’t have made the season happen without our incredible long-term partners at Avtex and in particular, their fantastic director of revenue, marketing, Marshall Salisbury, Marshall, and his team, including Andy, Beth, Joseph, Greta, and John has supported the Experience This! Show for three seasons via their partnership and 2020 marked a new endeavor for all of us as we produced a fun new game show, Experience Points.

Joey Coleman (42:00):
We also want to thank our longterm friends, that Yoko Co. – that’s Stacy, Max, and Chris – who year after year maintain and update the Experience This! Show.com website, where you can find our show notes and share your stories with us. We also need to give a special shout out to our new for 2020 sound engineer, Daniel Romero’s affectionately known as Dr. Podcast who helped us mix and master our weekly shows remotely. Since we couldn’t do the in studio recording, we’ve done because of COVID 19 folks, when there’s a pandemic going on, it helps to have a doctor on your podcast team.

Dan Gingiss (42:35):
It does indeed. And we certainly want to give a shout out to Joey’s law school roommate, Davin Seaman, who continues to serve as the composer of all of our show music, artfully creating new segment trailers whenever we come up with new segments that we want to share with all of you!

Joey Coleman (42:50):
And it wouldn’t be a proper roundup of thank yous and gratitude if we didn’t conclude by thanking all of our wonderful loyal listeners. The way you continue to show up every week on iTunes, or Spotify, or Stitcher, or wherever you’re listening to us, is the driving force behind our desire to continue producing this show. We are so thankful that you enable us to continue to do something that Dan and I love, and we greatly appreciate your consistent and ongoing support.

Dan Gingiss (43:20):
So thanks for a fantastic season six. And we’ll see you back in early February of 2021 for our seventh season of Experience This!

Joey Coleman (43:30):
I think that’ll make it our lucky season won’t it Dan? Season seven? Our lucky season? Well, rest assured that we’re already thinking about fun things to share with you for your weekly dose of positive customer experience. See you in 2021.

[SHOW OUTRO]
Joey Coleman (43:50):
Wow. Thanks for joining us for another episode of Experience This!

Dan Gingiss (43:54):
We know there are tons of podcasts to listen to, magazines and books to read, reality TV to watch. We don’t take for granted that you’ve decided to spend some quality time listening to the two of us.

Joey Coleman (44:03):
We hope you enjoyed our discussions, and if you do, we’d love to hear about it. Come on over to ExperienceThis Show.com and let us know what segments you enjoyed, what new segments you’d like to hear. This show is all about experience, and we want you to be part of the Experience This! Show!

Dan Gingiss (44:21):
Thanks again for your time and we’ll see you next week for more.

Joey Coleman (44:25):
Experience

Dan Gingiss (44:25):
This!