Episode 115 – Making Every Touchpoint Matter Across the Entire Customer Journey

Join us as we discuss a camping trip gone awry, why every customer touchpoint matters, and thinking fast when money is on the line.

Camping, Optimizing, and Winning – Oh My!

[Listener Stories] A Camping Trip Gone Awry

Things We Mentioned in This Segment:

• Managing Expectations: A Customer Experience That Leaves Praise on the Table – Guest blog post by Jamie Drake on the Dan Gingiss Blog

[CX Press] How to Identify and Optimize Customer Experience Touchpoints

Things We Mentioned in This Segment:

How to Identify and Optimize Customer Experience Touchpoints – by Jessica Greene at Help Scout
• Charles Schwab

[Crossover Segment] Experience Points – Think Fast with Shep Hyken

Things We Mentioned in This Segment:

• Experience Points – presented by Avtex
• Shep Hyken – customer service and experience expert, keynote speaker, and best-selling author; think of him as the “godfather” of customer service
• Think Fast – Celebrity Guest Shep Hyken – Experience Points
• The State of B2B Customer Experience Report – by GetFeedback (at SurveyMonkey)
• Microsoft
• Ritz Carlton
• Fake or Fact?! – Celebrity Guest Shep Hyken – Experience Points
• What Happened? – Celebrity Guest Shep Hyken – Experience Points

Host Contact Information

Email Dan: Dan@dangingiss.com

Tweet Dan Gingiss: @DGingiss

Email Joey: JoeyC@JoeyColeman.com

DanGingiss.com

JoeyColeman.com

Subscribe to Experience This on Apple Podcasts

Episode Transcript

Download an unedited transcript of Episode 115 here or read it below:

[SHOW INTRO]
Dan Gingiss (00:05):
Welcome to Experience This!

Joey Coleman (00:08):
Where you’ll find inspiring examples of customer experience, great stories of customer service, and tips on how to make your customers love you even more!

Dan Gingiss (00:18):
Always upbeat and definitely entertaining, customer retention expert Joey Coleman

Joey Coleman (00:23):
and social media expert Dan Gingiss, serve as your hosts for a weekly dose of positive customer experience.

Dan Gingiss (00:31):
So hold on to your headphones… It’s time to Experience This!

[EPISODE 115 INTRO]
Dan Gingiss (00:39):
Get ready for another episode of the Experience This Show!

Joey Coleman (00:45):
Join us as we discuss a camping trip gone awry, why every customer touchpoint matters, and thinking fast when money is on the line.

Dan Gingiss (00:58):
Camping, Optimizing, and Winning – Oh My!

[SEGMENT INTRO – LISTENER STORIES]
Joey Coleman (01:03):
You listened to us, now we want to listen to you. By visiting our website and sharing your remarkable customer experiences with us, we can share them with a broader audience. Now, sit back and enjoy our Listener Stories.

[LISTENER STORIES][A Camping Trip Gone Awry]
Dan Gingiss (01:22):
My high school friend, and new virtual assistant, Jamie Drake recently embarked on a 25 day, 3,400 mile camping adventure.

Joey Coleman (01:33):
Wow! That’s a long adventure… let’s be honest.

Dan Gingiss (01:35):
Yeah, that is a long adventure, especially during COVID. And uh, so she goes on this adventure and she wrote about it for a blog on my website, which is@dangingiss.com. Now she spoke about managing expectations and this idea of leaving potential prays on the table when companies miss those expectations. So in much the same way that I love to talk about. And I know you do too Joey, about how creating positive experiences causes people to share with friends and family. We also know that creating poor experiences, not only causes people to share, but also can just cause them to remain silent and that can often be bad.

Joey Coleman (02:16):
And sometimes, that’s even worse because if they’re loud and they’re unhappy, you can at least do something about it because you’re aware of it. If they’re silent and unhappy, Ooo, now you’re in trouble.

Dan Gingiss (02:29):
Exactly. And you’re missing out on an opportunity to have a fan praise you. And in this case, you know, Jamie has a decent following on social media and she’s got an audience that knows that she is a camper. And so she’s sort of a mini expert in this field and could very much be talking very positively about this, uh, camping supply company that she went to and, uh, and dead isn’t. Now we asked her to not name the company, but the point here is that there’s a huge missed opportunity. So let’s have Jamie tell her side of the story here.

Jamie Drake (03:12):
I recently went on a 25 days, 3,400 mile Epic adventure with my family and our camper. Now we’re seasoned campers. And when the world told us it wasn’t safe for us to leave our house, we decided to figure out a way to take our house with us. We were in a global pandemic and we wanted to try a socially distant exploration beyond our front door, after so many months of staying at home. So we saw our chance and we took it. But before we set out on our journey, we really needed one piece of the puzzle. And that was a new camper. The one that we had was a bit small. We knew exactly what we needed. We had done this before and we set out to our local chain of a national camping store to take care of buying a new camper. Our expectations were high and our excitement was even higher, but as soon as we walked in the door, our expectations were lowered, and lowered, and lowered, as we were met with bad salesmen and sneaky sales techniques and told that we needed a camper that was bigger and better and more expensive than what we were looking for. We didn’t appreciate these blatant tactics to encourage us to spend more money and buy a bigger unit. The constant obvious efforts were distracting and made the experience far less enjoyable. Now nothing was going to detract us from going on this trip. We wanted to take this adventure. We just also wanted to immerse ourselves in the culture of the store and have the support we needed on the road. Now they bragged and bragged about the epic support that they were going to provide while we were on the road. Should we need anything? And of course we were let down at every turn when we reached out for help, they weren’t there. But, I did learn a few things about being a customer. And I realize that loyalty should never be taken for granted. My loyalty should have been earned. It should have been nurtured. And in the future, when I need to buy something for our camper or our camping trips, I’m going to go out of our way to make sure I’m not purchasing or interacting with this company again. So they missed an opportunity to not only create a customer for life, but to create a loyal fan and they could have been singing their praises, but instead they left that praise on the table.

Dan Gingiss (05:28):
So the rest of Jamie’s story, which she talks about in the blog is that she actually did need the company’s help during the camping trip. And several times tried to reach out to them and you know, the whole sales pitch was about, Oh, we’ve got all these locations around the country. So wherever you are, we can come help you. And when she called the local locations, they had no idea who she was or what she needed or why they, why she was calling them…

Joey Coleman (05:55):
or had, it sounds like, any desire to help. Not only did they not have any of the things that had been promised, but it sounds like the lack of experience or the commitment to experience was so low that they didn’t even see it as an opportunity to create a good experience, to live up to an expectation, even if they weren’t aware of that expectation.

Dan Gingiss (06:18):
Well, right. And we’ve talked about this in some other segments, like when we talked about car rental companies, for example, you know, oftentimes there is the city that you pick up the car and the city that you’d drop off the car and it’s the same…

Joey Coleman (06:33):
And the billion dollar fee you pay for dropping it off, not in the same city, which I never understood. How often does that happen? It’s like just free money for the car companies.

Dan Gingiss (06:43):
It is. But my point there being that you often have two different experiences with the same company, but with two completely different groups of people. And I think that’s what the expectation was here, but I actually want to start at the early part of her story because I thought was what was so interesting here was the slimy sales techniques. And we’ve kind of all been through this at some point in our life. And, and we’ve talked on this show about various, uh, uh, sales experiences that we’ve had. But I thought that it was really interesting because this was like shooting fish in a barrel. I mean, she walked in knowing she was going to buy it camper, not like a stick of gum, like a camper, a significant purchase!

Joey Coleman (07:26):
It’s a significant investment. And I would imagine in general, uh, in the general scenario, I’ve never sold campers before, but I would imagine there are two and only two types of people that come into a camping store: the ones that are there to buy a camper that day and the ones that are there to kick tires, I think very rarely does somebody go in and go, Hey, let’s just go in and see what they have. And later go, let’s just get a camper. Right? I don’t think that happens. So you’re really only trying to discern between two types of potential avatars, if you will, or personas – the person who’s ready to buy that day and the person who is going to need a lot more convincing, and we’re almost certain is not going to buy that day. And Jamie was clearly the ideal one, the one we want in sales, the person who shows up ready to rock, ready to make this substantial investment.

Dan Gingiss (08:21):
Exactly. And I believe it’s page one, paragraph, one of the sales handbook that says selling when you get a yes.

Joey Coleman (08:28):
a hundred percent!

Dan Gingiss (08:30):
Like you’ve already convinced me. And like I said, Jamie and her family walked in convinced they were going to buy and they had done their research. And I think, you know, something that we haven’t talked about on the show, I don’t believe in 115 episodes is this idea that customers have so much research that they can do before even walking into a store nowadays. I mean, think about back when our parents buying a car, it was yeah. Our dealership that knew everything about the car.

Joey Coleman (08:59):
They knew everything about the car. They knew what colors it was available and they knew all the parts, all the functions, all the features. Now I can get that in 35 seconds on a website. Oh. And by the way, if I’m interested in buying a ca,r or in Jamie’s case a camper, I’m going to do my research in advance. There’s a high likelihood that your customer walking in actually knows more about your product than you do, because they only have learned about one of them. They’ve narrowed the field to the one camper that they want. Whereas you might have a dozen different makes and models that you’re selling. Whereas Jamie walked in knowing this is the exact one I want with these features or these ad-ons or you know, these elements.

Dan Gingiss (09:41):
Yeah. So I, I think that was, that really stood out to me that here’s somebody who knows what she wants. It’s an expensive item. Why can’t this salesperson just sell it to her? Why do they have to feel like they’ve got an upsell or offer her additional features? And as she said, this started off the experience poorly for her. And so they haven’t even left on the trip and they already don’t really like this company. Now that is not how you want to start a relationship with somebody who is about to make a big purchase with you. Somebody who has it turns out is an influencer in this space. Uh, but, uh, you know, it doesn’t even matter if you’re not an influencer that you still have friends and family and colleagues that you’re going to talk to about this new camper that you bought.

Joey Coleman (10:24):
Well, I would posit Dan that in 2020, everyone is an influencer.

Dan Gingiss (10:29):
Well, everyone has influence.

Joey Coleman (10:31):
Everybody has an influence. Everybody has a network of people who probably have similar interests or likes on them. I mean, in my experience, somebody who’s into camping, probably as friends that are into camping, you know, that kind of thing. And so we miss the opportunity because I think we’ve defined influence or where the capital “I” meaning somebody that has, you know, a million followers on Twitter, as opposed to influencer, maybe with a lowercase “i” that is, Hey, within their network, whether we take Dunbar’s Law and say, you know, 150 people or Facebook, a thousand plus friends that they’re going to post about their camping trip on Facebook or on social media and tell people about it’s like, there are people that are being influenced by the experience. And that’s why every experience I would say matters even more than it used to.

Dan Gingiss (11:18):
Yeah, I totally agree. So look, here’s what we can learn from Jamie’s situation here with the camper, when you are a salesperson, or if you have a sales staff, it’s important to one personalize the pitch, right? And in this case, the pitch did not need to be. And here’s all the other things we have because this particular person walked in knowing what they wanted. Someone else might walk in and say, well, here’s the story. I’ve got a family of six and we want to do this. And we don’t like this and we want to cook. And, and, and they may offer you the opportunity to give them options. In this particular case, that’s not, what’s happened. Number two is trying to provide immediate value because the beginning of this relationship started off sour. Now you’re playing from behind the eight ball when instead they could have wowed her with the initial experience, you know, kind of creating that expectation. And frankly, that comfort that the experience was going to continue to be positive throughout the camping trip. As we mentioned, stop selling when you get to a yes and finally make sure that the rest of your organization can deliver on what the sales team promises. So in Jamie’s case, they promise, don’t worry, we’ll be there for you wherever you stop in the country. And that turned out not to be true. So if it isn’t true, don’t be saying it to your prospective customers. So learn from the experience of Jamie and the bad experience that she had with this camping company. And don’t make the same mistakes at your company.

[SEGMENT INTRO – CX PRESS]
Joey Coleman (12:51):
There are so many great customer experience articles to read, but who has the time! We summarize them and offer clear takeaways you can implement starting tomorrow. Enjoy this segment of CX Press – where we read the articles, so you don’t need to!

[CX PRESS][How to Identify and Optimize Customer Experience Touchpoints]
Dan Gingiss (13:09):
This week’s CX Press article comes to us from Jessica Greene at Help Scout and is entitled “How to identify and optimize customer experience touch points.” Now the article begins and I’m quoting customer touch points or specific places in the customer journey where prospects and customers interact with your company. Those touch points might be direct interactions such as getting a demo from your sales team, or they can be indirect interactions such as reading a blog post, you published. Each of your customer touch points has a direct impact on your overall customer experience. The way prospects and customers perceive your company. A poor experience at one touch point can easily degrade the customer’s perception of multiple positive historical experiences at other touchpoints unquote. And I thought that last point was super powerful, right?

Joey Coleman (14:01):
Dan, I was just going to say, we need to reread that right. “A poor experience at one touchpoint can easily degrade the customer’s perception of multiple positive historical experiences at other touchpoints.” So it’s not enough to get one or two of them, right? Folks, we got to get all of them and a bad situation can erase all the goodwill you’ve built up.

Dan Gingiss (14:24):
Yeah, it’s that old saying? You know, it takes years to get a customer and second salutes one century. It’s absolutely true. And unfortunately, a negative experience is just weighed more heavily than positive one. I do believe that companies kind of build up a, a Goodwill bank over time that if you have enough positive experiences, I think customers are more forgiving of a negative experience. You know, for example, a company I’ve talked very highly about in the, because I’ve been a customer for a long time, Charles Schwab, I had an incident the other day, actually it was a day where the stock market opened up at, it was up 1500 points and everybody was going crazy. And for the first 45 minutes of the trading day, their site was down. Ooh, that’s good. Right. But you don’t want it. I wasn’t, I, I was a little bit frustrated, but I wasn’t angry at them because I’ve had such a great experience with them since literally 1996, that I was much more forgiving. So I do think you can build up that Goodwill, but what Jessica says makes a ton of sense. She goes on to list 11 key touch points and then shares what can be done at each of those touch points to ensure a seamless customer experience. Now, the touch points that she covered are the company website, the blog, social media emails, paid advertising, customer referrals, sales calls, and demos, self service, customer support, renewals, and cancellation. I love that she included cancellation.

Joey Coleman (16:00):
Yeah. So did I say it’s like this entire article, everything it’s the last sentence is where all the gold is. I mean, there’s gold in all of these, but again, same thing, as she said before in the, in the segment that you quoted, you know, the cancellation, a huge piece of the customer journey that is often overlooked. And what I love about this list is that it’s actually not in sequential order because I think all too often brands presume that a customer’s going to come down a certain path. But what we know is someone might see the ad, which is in the middle of her list and then do a sales call, which is just passed that in her list and then say, well, you know, I’m not sure I’m going to go check out their website and their blog. And you know, what people are saying are social. So people are, you know, customers are jumping all around the journey. It’s not a singular linear path that they’re walking. And I think that brands and organizations that think more holistically about the journey and that the customer can enter from any direction and move in any direction, once they’re in the flow is a great way to catch all of the touch points.

Dan Gingiss (17:06):
Yeah, absolutely. The customer journey is not linear and there is not one journey because everybody goes at their own pace and everybody researches differently, et cetera. And I’d also like to point out that while Jessica does a great job with these 11 key touch points, there’s lots of other touch points that can happen as well. Just a few that, uh, that I came up with kind of just thinking off the top of my head, and I’m sure you have some too Joey, you know, customer surveys, or voice of the customer opportunities, the mobile app, older, uh, throwback, uh, marketing channels like direct mail and television advertising, for example.

Joey Coleman (17:46):
Absolutely! Or things like phone calls – hello! – or billing, which guaranteed there is some form of billing and/or receipts or payment process. Contracts, the actual use of the product or service that you’re offering, and then all the intangible touch points and tangible touch points that come from use, whether they’re needing to call in for more order new supplies or, you know, get, you know, new ways of interacting that come from the usage of your products or services at the end of the day, if we’re actually to map out all the interactions, it can be pretty overwhelming and pretty daunting. And then I’ll layer this up. One more level, Dan, as a general rule, I’d be willing to bet that whether you take her list of 11 or the list we’ve added on, we’re now covering about 12 different departments within the organization.

Dan Gingiss (18:37):
Well, of course, and I think it certainly goes to show you that everyone in your organization has either a direct or indirect impact on the customer. There are very few, if any people that have no impact, right? And you could say, well, what about the person in the finance department? While the person in the finance department might oversee somebody who sends out the invoices or might determine the pricing, or might determine something else about how the financial aspect of your experience works. And though they may not be in front of the customer and the customer may never know the person’s name. They still may have a really big impact on how that person perceives your company. So check out the article on Help Scout’s website, we’ll link to it on ExperienceThisShow.com it’s called “How to Identify and Optimize Customer Experience Touchpoints.” And when you get back to work, after listening to experience this, try to list all of your customer touch points.

[SEGMENT INTRO – CROSSOVER SEGMENT – EXPERIENCE POINTS]
Dan Gingiss (19:44):
The following is a crossover segment from the new game show that Joey and I have been telling you about Experience Points – brought to you by our friends at Avtex who also sponsor experience this the new game show, combined fun and trivia with lively discussions on how to raise the experience bar in your business. This week, we feature a game called think fast with our good friend Shep Hyken. Enjoy the segment and see how many of the questions you get. Right?

[CROSSOVER SEGMENT – EXPERIENCE POINTS][Think Fast with Shep Hyken]
Rules Hostess (20:14):
In think fast, you will have one minute to answer five experience questions for each question you must quickly choose between two possible answers. Correct answers. Given before time runs out are worth 100 points, five, correct answers will earn you 500 bonus points for a possible school of 1000 points.

Joey Coleman (20:36):
There’s big money on the line Shep – are you ready to get started?

Shep Hyken (20:40):
Let’s get this party started!

Dan Gingiss (20:42):
All right. So for Think Fast today, we are going to be giving some questions grom a recent report from our friends at GetFeedback by SurveyMonkey. This is the “State of B2B Customer Experience Report.” Now we know that you work with lots of B2B companies and that you are after all the godfather of customer experience. So they should be a piece of cake for you. You ready to go?

Shep Hyken (21:08):
I’m ready.

Dan Gingiss (21:09):
All right, Joey, give us 60 seconds on the clock and let’s make some money. What percentage of B2B companies think their company is delivering an excellent customer experience? 48% or 68%?

Shep Hyken (21:20):
68%.

Dan Gingiss (21:24):
What percentage didn’t have even one part-time person taking ownership of CX initiatives, 24% or 42%?

Shep Hyken (21:34):
42%.

Dan Gingiss (21:36):
What do B2B companies report is the number one challenge to customer experience. Is it organization silos or executive sponsorship?

Shep Hyken (21:44):
I’m going with executive sponsorship?

Dan Gingiss (21:48):
90% of B2B said there is good value in customer feedback. What percent understand how their customers perceive their experiences? 58% or 70%?

Shep Hyken (21:58):
58%.

Dan Gingiss (22:00):
And finally, what percent is say improving customer experience at their company is important or very important. Is it 75% or 87%?

Shep Hyken (22:07):
87%.

Dan Gingiss (22:08):
The time is running out 87!

Joey Coleman (22:12):
With barely a second to spare! There wasn’t even a second. It was like we were at the Olympics. It was ticking over. Wow. That was fast!

Shep Hyken (22:20):
I was worried whether Dan was going to finish the question before the clock ran out!

Dan Gingiss (22:24):
I told you I’d finish man!

Joey Coleman (22:26):
We were rooting for you buddy. Oh, you did a great job getting through all five of those. Now let’s see how you did.

Dan Gingiss (22:34):
All right. On the first question, which was, what percentage of B2B companies think their company is delivering an excellent customer experience? You said 68%. The answer is 48%.

Shep Hyken (22:50):
Well, that’s a shame because that report is wrong! No, I just, I’m just kidding. You know, there’s this huge disconnect between what companies think they’re doing and what the customers are actually perceiving to the point where it’s an overwhelming majority of leadership thinks their companies are doing far better than they actually are.

Joey Coleman (23:11):
Absolutely.

Shep Hyken (23:13):
That’s where I came up with that one.

Dan Gingiss (23:14):
A second question is what percentage didn’t have even one part-time person taking ownership.

Shep Hyken (23:21):
And I bet I blew this one.

Dan Gingiss (23:22):
You said 42%. And the answer is – 42%! Good job.

Shep Hyken (23:29):
That word “part-time” as I looked at it, was it not even one part-time person? Yeah. So there you go, 42. And that blows my mind because even if you look at 10 years ago, there were reports showing that by the year 2020 customer experience is going to be like the number one most important initiative that companies should have. And yet look at this.

Dan Gingiss (23:49):
And I can say from reading this report, what this actually means is it is not a single person full-time or part-time that is working on it. That is dedicated to it. Not a single person. Yeah.

Shep Hyken (24:01):
If I had to read it again, I would have probably got it wrong because that part time they got to have somebody, at least part-time caring about it.

Dan Gingiss (24:08):
42% say they don’t. So the next question, what to be B2B companies report as the number one challenge to customer experience. You said executive sponsorship, the answer is organization silos.

Shep Hyken (24:25):
Which is symptomatic of a lack of executive sponsorship.

Dan Gingiss (24:33):
Well, sir, unfortunately it’s still the wrong answer, but hey, good try. Um, question number four 90% of B2B said there’s good value in customer feedback. What percentage understand how their customers perceive their experience? You said 58%. The answer is 58%. Very good, sir.

Shep Hyken (24:58):
I’m batting 500 right now. Is that right?

Dan Gingiss (25:01):
Well, we got one more. Let’s see…

Dan Gingiss (25:02):
I just want to say that if I were a baseball player, I’d have one freaking huge contract right now.

Dan Gingiss (25:09):
That’s true. That’s true. All right. The final question was what percentage say improving customer experience at their company is important or very important? You said 87% and the answer is 87%. Well done, sir.

Joey Coleman (25:27):
Ooo Shep! Fantastic. Well, thank you very much. Love it. Love it. Well Shep, you know, these questions all speak to, as you said, the disconnect between what companies say is important to them and what they actually do. Why is it you think that so many companies claim that customer experience is a high priority, but it really hasn’t been elevated to that business level objective. They haven’t put the resources, the people, the effort behind it, as much as they put the lip service behind it.

Shep Hyken (26:03):
So there’s actually so many different ways you can go with this answer, but I’ll say a couple of things. Number one, um, I do believe that executive sponsorship or leaderships leadership sponsorship as it was called, is an issue within many companies. They talk about it and yet they don’t necessarily act as the role model. They don’t create the service vision. It becomes like a theme at a particular time when they receive a complaint. And then that becomes the next most important thing for the next three months, till they move on to something else, the best of the best companies decide. This is super important to them. They make it part of their culture. Uh, it’s it’s built into how they hire people. And, and I think that’s where, uh, I don’t know if I’m getting away from your original question, but if that’s what they want to do to take the business to the next level, they need to be thinking it’s not a department, it’s a culture, it’s philosophical, everybody’s involved. And we need to show people, everybody, the person in the warehouse, somebody behind the scenes that never sees a customer, we need to show them just how important their role is to the other people they work with and the outside customer,

Dan Gingiss (27:14):
You know, Shep one of the things that was interesting to me about this study and what might’ve caused you to get that first question wrong was that this was only B2B companies. And I don’t know about you. I know all three of us have spoken on many stages about customer service and customer experience. One of the questions that I get the most often when I walk off the stage is does this apply to B2B? And my answer, which might be slightly more sarcastic than yours is at depends. Do you market to human beings? And I sort of pause there and they’re like, uh, yes. I’m like, well then it applies because human beings are consumers in their real life. And as, as we all know, you’re being compared to every experience that they’ve had, but I’m wondering why do we, why is that still a question and why the B2B companies somehow either feel that they’re exempt or don’t have the same kind of infrastructure technology operations that B2Cs have to make CX a priority?

Shep Hyken (28:15):
Well, B2C is primarily a retail type of feeling to it or a frontline feeling to it, a consumer, feeling to it. However B2B is different. And that, and as you get to B2B where I don’t think we’re looking at, you know, a software company that sells to consumers, uh, I mean, I’ll even say Microsoft, even though they’re B2B, they’re very frontline retail focus with certain products. They have, however, then you get into manufacturers and I have a client that said, uh, they’re in the kind of automation, robotics industry. They sell huge equipment to factories. If they blow it, if they blow it, it’s not just a little mistake and a competitor comes in. It could be 15 years before that piece of machinery gets replaced. And they refer to that as a generational mistake. It takes a full generation before you have a chance to go in there and get that business back if you lose it. So I believe that customer service and experience is far more important at those levels. I mean, if I walk into a mall and I, Oh, there’s a store that sells the jeans that I’m looking for, I may not even notice the name of the store. If I’m just going in to get an item. Uh, now I’m really not that kind of person. I, I have my person that I like to buy from an a particular store. They know what I want, but a lot of people think this way and if I’m treated poorly, I just go onto the next store or the next store, the next store in the mall. There’s so many to choose from, by the way, when I come back to the mall, I may or may not remember that experience. I might try them again, by the way, two or three times have a bad experience and I’m not going back. Most likely a lot of customers say it only takes me one, but in that B2B world, Oh my gosh, if you blow it, it could be big. It can be it. It’s not like Joe w you know, somebody else will buy another pair of jeans. No, when’s the next person that’s going to buy that, you know, $2 million piece of equipment, or the next opportunity we have with that company, it could be big,

Joey Coleman (30:20):
You know, Shep it’s so true. And I was really taken aback by your comment of a generational mistake. I mean, that, that really, I think puts, uh, cuts right to the chase on how significant the impact of some of these things can be on a business. We’ve talked kind of strategically about the importance of paying attention to customer experience in a B2B scenario, a business to business scenario. Um, and we’ve talked about, you know, obviously from the results of the game that most companies aren’t giving it the time and attention it deserves. You mentioned that the power of a culture and an organization, uh, being committed to this type of endeavor, what would you say are maybe one or two tactical things that our listeners and viewers could do? I mean, we’ve got a lot of folks who are, uh, you know, kind of running customer experience at organizations, but we’ve also got a lot of people that are fans of the show that are more practitioners, any thoughts on a tactical idea or two to infuse that customer experience into the B2B environment?

Shep Hyken (31:25):
Sure. Well, I mean, I really got to go back to the top and that’s where leadership simply defines what a customer experience vision is for the company. And I want them to define it in a way that’s memorable and easy for everybody to get into their brain. Um, I know it’s not B2B, but let’s go back to my good friends at the Ritz Carlton. You’ve known me for years. I’ve been talking about them for years. Their nine word credo “we’re ladies and gentlemen, serving ladies and gentlemen,” it’s nine words. When you come to work at the Ritz, that basically, you know what that’s about, you understand it, and then they train to it training. And it’s not something you did. It’s something you do ongoing, constantly reminding and reinforcing and sharing stories about when it’s working and what it really stands for. And that’s, what’s going to get that organization to start to get into alignment with a customer focused culture and start heading in the right direction, by the way, this credo or mantra, whatever you want to call it, this vision it’s permanent. You can’t say this is this year’s theme. This is what you do once you and live with it, change it, modify it for the first six months till you finally get to where, you know, this is what I want to live with the rest of my life, or at least close to it for years, at least.

Dan Gingiss (32:39):
All right. Cool. Well Joey, let’s recap how Shep scored playing think fast

Joey Coleman (32:45):
In this game, correct answers are worth a hundred points and Shep answered three questions correctly, which means he earned 300 points. Now these points convert into dollars, which means Shep earned a $300 donation to the Michael J. Fox foundation for Parkinson’s research. Congratulations, Shep!

Shep Hyken (33:05):
Well, thank you. And thank you to our good friends at Avtex for doing this. And you guys are great hosts. You know, if this whole thing doesn’t work out for you, I think a game show host is in your future.

Dan Gingiss (33:19):
This concludes this episode of Experience Points and check out more games with Shep and other celebrity contestants at ExperiencePointsGame.com. That site again is ExperiencePointsGame.com. We’ll see you soon for more examples of remarkable customer experiences here at Experience Points presented by Avtex.

Joey Coleman (33:48):
We hope you enjoyed that little teaser game of Experience Points for more game show episodes, head over to www.ExperiencePointsGame.com that’s ExperiencePointsGame.com or Avtex’s YouTube channel, or your favorite podcast app. Friends – you can find Experience Points all over the place. Go check it out!

[SHOW OUTRO]
Joey Coleman (34:17):
Wow! Thanks for joining us for another episode of Experience This!

Dan Gingiss (34:21):
We know there are tons of podcasts to listen to, magazines and books to read, reality TV to watch. We don’t take for granted that you’ve decided to spend some quality time listening to the two of us.

Joey Coleman (34:31):
We hope you enjoyed our discussions, and if you do, we’d love to hear about it. Come on over to ExperienceThisShow.com and let us know what segments you enjoyed, what new segments you’d like to hear. This show is all about experience, and we want you to be part of the Experience This Show.

Dan Gingiss (34:49):
Thanks again for your time and we’ll see you next week for more.

Joey Coleman (34:53):
Experience.

Dan Gingiss (34:53):
This!