Episode 112 – Little Things Make a Big Difference in Customer Experience


Join us as we discuss a little touch that drew a lot of attention, the power of seeing someone’s face when they speak, and a viral sensation that brought together two classic brands..

Fretboard, Facemask, and Fleetwood – Oh My!

[Listener Stories] The Power of Little Notes

Things We Mentioned in This Segment:

Jeff Robbins, customer experience professional andExperience This! Show listener
• Fretboard Coffee
• Dave Elman, owner of Fretboard Coffee
• Submit Your Listener Story Here

[ReDesign the Experience] The Apple Mask

Things We Mentioned in This Segment:

Apple Design Teams Develop Special Face Masks for Employees – by Mark Gurman in Bloomberg.com
• KN95 Mask (N95 mask)
• Apple
Apple Mask – courtesy of Mark Gurman (Twitter: @markgurman)
Clear Mask
Gallaudet University
Episode 42, Season 2

[Partnership with Avtex] Playing Experience Points – What Happened?

Things We Mentioned in This Segment:

• Avtex
• Experience Points

[CX Press] TikTok + DoggFace + Ocean Spray + Fleetwood Mac = Viral Video

Things We Mentioned in This Segment:

Ocean Spray Just Gave Viral Skateboarding TikTok Guy an Extraordinary Gift – It’s a Lesson in Emotional Intelligence – by Justin Bariso in Inc.com
• Nathan “DoggFace” Apodaca TikTok video (original)
• Ocean Spray
• Fleetwood Mac
• Dreams by Fleetwood Mac
• Nissan Frontier Pickup
• Thank You Nissan and Ocean Spray TikTok video
• Tom Hays, CEO at Ocean Spray Cranberries
• Tom Hays TikTik video
• Billboard – Fleetwood Mac

Host Contact Information

Email Dan: Dan@dangingiss.com

Tweet Dan Gingiss: @DGingiss

Email Joey: JoeyC@JoeyColeman.com

DanGingiss.com

JoeyColeman.com

Subscribe to Experience This on Apple Podcasts

Episode Transcript

Download an unedited transcript of Episode 112 here or read it below:

[SHOW INTRO]
Dan Gingiss (00:05):
Welcome to Experience This!

Joey Coleman (00:08):
Where you’ll find inspiring examples of customer experience, great stories of customer service, and tips on how to make your customers love you even more!

Dan Gingiss (00:17):
Always upbeat and definitely entertaining customer attention expert, Joey Coleman

Joey Coleman (00:23):
and social media expert, Dan Gingiss serve as your hosts for a weekly dose of positive customer experience.

Dan Gingiss (00:30):
So hold on to your headphones, it’s time to Experience This!

[EPISODE 112 INTRO]
Joey Coleman (00:40):
Get ready for another episode of the Experience This Show!

Dan Gingiss (00:44):
Join us as we discuss a little touch that drew a lot of attention, the power of seeing someone’s face when they speak, and a viral sensation that brought together two classic brands.

Joey Coleman (00:58):
Fretboard, face mask, and Fleetwood… Oh my!

[SEGMENT INTRO – LISTENER STORIES]
Joey Coleman (01:04):
You listened to us. Now, we want to listen to you by visiting our website and sharing your remarkable customer experiences with us. We can share them with a broader audience. Now, sit back and enjoy our Listener Stories.

[LISTENER STORIES][The Power of Little Notes]
Joey Coleman (01:22):
We’ve got the best listeners in the world, don’t we Dan!

Dan Gingiss (01:25):
I could not agree with you more, Joey. I get so excited when people give us feedback and tell us how much they love the show, or they point out a specific segment. And it just makes me feel like the work that we put into this show is worth something to people and that we’re helping them. And I think that is very rewarding.

Joey Coleman (01:46):
Absolutely. And you know, we’re big fans of creating an actionable show, but we’re also big fans of the fact that we’re not the only two having experiences in the world. And we regularly get messages from our listeners where they share interesting stories about something that’s happened to them that they thought we might enjoy.

Dan Gingiss (02:06):
And we definitely enjoy them.

Joey Coleman (02:08):
Yes we do. Which is why we were thrilled to receive the following message from Jeff Robbins, a loyal listener of Experience This:

Jeff Robbins (02:17):
Dan and Joey longtime listener. First time recorder wanted to share a story with you, a kind of experience, economy type story, taking a basic commodity to making it into an experience for you. Uh, live in Columbia, Missouri. I’m a experienced professional here and coffee shop here, small little local coffee shop. When you buy a pound of coffee, you open up the package and there’s a business card in there with the name of the company on there. And then there’s on the back that says your coffee was born while we rock too. And then I’ll tell you the song and the artist. And it says, thanks for the little musical note. It’s all handwritten. It’s a great little surprise. The first I saw it, I was like blown away. And so just instantly became loyal to this local roaster and a great, great coffee. And the name of the coffee shop is Fretboard – so it has a musical vibe to it. So want to share that with you? Thanks so much. Appreciate your show.

Dan Gingiss (03:19):
Okay. First of all, I love long time listener. First time recorder, outstanding way to start your submission, Jeff. We really appreciate it. Great story. This sounds like an amazing place. Really. It means a lot to us that you are helping us find really cool experiences that are out there. Because a lot of the stories that we tell here are personal experiences or from our own friends and family. And so when we have listeners submit them, it really means a lot to us and we will share them all day long people because we love hearing about new experiences.

Joey Coleman (03:56):
Absolutely. And Dan and I were very intrigued by this story for a number of reasons which we’re going to get into, but we reached back out to Jeff to see if he could snag a photo of the insert card that he mentioned so that we could include it on the show notes at: experiencedthisshow.com, which by the way we did so you should go check it out at: experiencethisshow.com and Jeff later shared that he picked up some more Fretboard Coffee.

Joey Coleman (04:22):
That was a reminder for those of you that might be less musically inclined than others. The fret board is basically think of it as the strip of wood, where you put your fingers on a guitar, right, where you’re kind of pressing down different strings on the guitar to change the sound that’s the fret board or the fingerboard. Okay. So Jeff shared that he picked up some more Fretboard Coffee, but to his surprise, there was no song card. And Jeff was super bummed his words and decided to email the contact address on the website and the owner. Dave Elman emailed back very quickly. In fact, he replied in less than 30 minutes and here’s what the owner of fretboard coffee had to say:

Joey Coleman (05:01):
Hi Jeffrey, thanks for your email. It’s one of my favorite little touches and I’d love to keep it going. However, when the pandemic hit, we had to carefully consider every aspect of production. We decided to suspend the song cards as it was just one less thing to put into the coffee bags that could potentially introduce contamination. I realized that the risk is extremely small, but as a business, we’ve decided to take every precaution possible. We shut down to the public before it was mandated and we’ve had all staff in masks since far before it was required. Our shop is actually still closed to the public for now. We hope that we can bring the coffee cards back after things returned to normal. Please keep in touch and let us know if you have any other questions. Thanks Dave Elman owner and roaster at Fretboard Coffee.

Dan Gingiss (05:49):
Okay. First of all, you glossed over a little too quickly, the whole responded in 30 minutes thing. Cause that’s incredible. Especially the owner of the company. And I talk about being responsive all the time. I wrote about it in my first book. And it’s part of my whole theory on creating remarkable experiences is when people talk about you and they say nice things, or when they have questions or complaints, when you’re responsive, people remember that. And the fact that the owner responded in 30 minutes is incredible. And then I liked his answer too, right? It’s an honest answer. It is the, the move that they made was done for the safety of the customers. And so I read this note and I feel better about the coffee company, even though I might be missing one of my favorite aspects of it.

Joey Coleman (06:37):
Absolutely. And this is the fine line that so many businesses in the COVID era are walking. This idea that pieces of your business operations that are designed to create little touch points or little special experiences for your customers may have been called into questions, or maybe you can’t do them anymore because of the pandemic. And how are you navigating that? Now what’s interesting is Jeff – who submitted the story to us, let us know that he is pumped, that Dave will eventually bring the song card back. That being said, quote, “I appreciate his attention to the sensitivity around contamination and the effort to keep his employees and customers safe.” Now friends, let me point something out that Jeff shared that I think is the case with the majority of your customers. If you explain to them why you are doing things, and if it comes from a place of empathy and a place of consideration and care for either the customer or your employees or both, most customers will understand, most customers will say, wow, I know I’m not getting exactly what I used to get. And while that’s disappointing, thanks for making the right choice, even though it was the hard choice.

Dan Gingiss (07:54):
And I’ll add onto that, Joey, I believe firmly that right now and probably for the next six to 12 months, that safety is going to be one of the key words of customer experience. That if people don’t feel safe doing business with you, they’re going to go to your competitor. And so the fact that they’re doing this at the coffee shop to keep their customers safe and that Jeff, our listener understands that and appreciates that. I guarantee you makes him more loyal to the company and he’ll be there when they finally open up their doors again. And so safety is absolutely critical and I believe that’s going to continue even after the pandemic. I think all of us that used to laugh at call people germaphobes, we’re all germaphobes now. I don’t think the hand sanitizers going away just because the pandemic’s over, right? We’re going to want clean spaces. We’re not going to want contamination. And people are going to be more sensitive to it after going through this, this pandemic. So the safety thing is going to be a key component of the experience going forward.

Joey Coleman (09:04):
Dan, I couldn’t agree more. You know, I was doing a presentation for a group of executives the other day, and I was actually talking about Maslow’s hierarchy of needs. And at the risk of turning this into a psychology one Oh one class, most people in the business world have heard of Maslow’s hierarchy of needs. But if you haven’t, here’s a quick little refresher, it’s basically a pyramid. And the idea being as you get the needs at the base of the pyramid, you move up to the next level and then the next level. And then the next level on the top of the pyramid is something called self-actualization, which is what most businesses were offering pre-pandemic. They were offering you products and services that allowed you to create the best version of yourself. What we’ve been called to do now in a pandemic era is to go to the bottom of the pyramid: safety air, your personal security, your physiological safety, all of these elements that were prior to the pandemic, just basic Antioch up chips for human survival. That had been called into question. So I totally agree with you. Friends were at least six more months of this, if not a year of this, if not 18 more months of this, and I’m not saying of this being the full pandemic experience we’re having, but the impact that COVID-19 is having on business operations now at the risk of, you know, making this all about the pandemic, I do want to point out that Jeff shared a couple of other elements of the Fretboard experience that caught his attention and caught our attention as well. You get a free 12 ounce coffee when you purchase a bag of coffee. So when you go into the store and you buy the bag that they’re going to give you something to drink, to enjoy now so that they don’t delay the gratification until you go home and use the bag of coffee to make the coffee at home. The label that is written on the bag is handwritten as is the song card. So it has this personal touch. The espresso bar at their physical location is a beautiful giant wooden fret board. So they take the name of the brand and they’ve made it part of the fixtures in their location. And the shop is actually a garage, which makes you think about a garage band. So they are really living the experience in every touch point.

Dan Gingiss (11:20):
I love that. And it, again, that, you know, they’re appealing to obviously a certain population with that. But I think the idea of a consistent experience is one that we talk about. And it’s what defines a great customer experience. I usually use the word immersive, which is feeling the experience in your bones and understanding, and feeling that it’s consistent throughout. And so what I love is from start to finish that it’s a different kind of coffee shop that has created this immersive experience that is all around guitars and music. And I think that, you know, it is important to note that one of the key facets of that experience they had to eliminate they’ve obviously kept some of the others, but I think that this is why Jeff even noticed it, right? Because they’ve created something that is different and unique and immersive, and then when it goes away, people notice it. And so the learning here to me, one of the big learnings is that when you create an immersive experience, it is a great way for people to remember you. And we use the word remarkable here on the show all the time, meaning literally worthy of remark, because we want people to talk about your business in a positive way. And it certainly sounds like this place has done a great job of that.

Joey Coleman (12:43):
I couldn’t agree more, Dan, you know, and when we think of an immersive experience, how does our listener story from Jeff Robbins support that theory? Well, it’s the little things that matter. A small gesture employed by Fretboard Coffee, to insert a little card, telling people who purchased their coffee beans, what the roasters were listening to when making the product got Jeff’s attention. So he shared that with us, which led us to connect with Jeff, who then reconnected with Fretboard Coffee’s owner and all of this culminated in a story that we share with our listeners all over the world. Friends, we have two requests for you: number one, keep the stories coming, visit experience this show.com, navigate to the contact page, and then click on the orange button, labeled start recording, and you’ll be able to leave us a recording about some experience you’ve had. And hopefully we can play that in a future episode. And number two, if you love coffee and you want to support small businesses that are really doing their best to deliver remarkable experiences before, during, and after the COVID-19 pandemic, go to FretboardCoffee.com, that’s fretboard F R E T B O a R D coffee.com and order some coffee or some cool coffee, swag or something, help us support our listeners and their stories!

[SEGMENT INTRO – REDESIGN THE EXPERIENCE]
Joey Coleman (14:11):
With a pandemic, sweeping the globe and shifting the way organizations interact with their customers many of the old ways of operating just don’t work anymore. As we all navigate a COVID-19 world, it’s time to Redesign the Experience,

[REDESIGN THE EXPERIENCE][The Apple Mask]
Joey Coleman (14:30):
Out of curiosity Dan, how many masks would you say are in your regular rotation when you go out in public these days?

Dan Gingiss (14:38):
Oh, wow. I hadn’t actually thought of it that way. And I would say I’m not using it as a fashion statement, but I obviously have my Cubs mask. I mean, so clearly I got that one, but that one you got no, cause that’s kind of a cloth masks so I’m not enough super excited about how protective it actually is, but I have the KN95 for when I go to the grocery store, a place where I know there’s going to be a lot of people. And then I have kind of the disposable, you know, white or blue mask that, you know, I use once or twice and, and toss. But those are probably the three that you’ll see me rocking.

Joey Coleman (15:15):
Gotcha. Well, I’ve actually got four. I’ve got the N95, you know, that’s kind of the, Oh my goodness. And then I’ve got three cloth ones, a bright blue one, a dark blue one and a gray one. But after seeing a recent story on Bloomberg, I’m thinking I may need to track down another one. Now this story was all about the special face mask that Apple has designed for their employees to wear in both their corporate headquarters and their retail store environments. Now, because it’s a product designed by Apple. You can imagine there will be two key components.

Dan Gingiss (15:51):
I’m going with beautiful design and crazy prices.

Joey Coleman (15:56):
You know, Dan, you are half, right? If you go to the show notes at experience, this show.com, you can see some photos of an unboxing experience that an Apple employee shared on Twitter of all places. Ironically enough, I know, right. It was linked to in the article and I clicked through. But as you might imagine, it feels pretty familiar with the same white packaging and white product design. It’s very AirPods. So in that way, but that being said, you can’t purchase these masks. They’re only for Apple employees to wear while working at headquarters or working in their stores.

Dan Gingiss (16:34):
Well, of course I love that the company is paying attention to its employees and providing PPE to keep them safe. We know we’ve said before, we’ll say it again. Employee experience equals customer experience. If your employees are feeling safe, then they’re going to be able to make your customers feel safe. If your employees don’t feel safe, it’s a lot to ask them to try to make customers feel safe. So I love that Apple has gone above and beyond in typical Apple style and made this mask that I’m hoping you’re going to tell me at some point we can still get.

Joey Coleman (17:08):
Well, here’s the thing. We can’t get this one, but don’t worry. There’s, there’s good news at the end of the story. What I like about this is Apple did two things. Number one, you know, it’s Apple, right? So they require you to wear a uniform, which is basically a t-shirt. And I don’t know how often you go into the Apple store, damn, but the t-shirts kind of change. They’ve got different colors and different messages, and it’s all very branded and on brand in terms of the, the marketing messaging and the positioning. But I also like that they, you know, recognize that the mask has really become a fashion statement, not a fashion statement in the sense that as I alluded to at the beginning of the story, you’re picking what color you want to wear, but this idea that you’re wearing it and so they’re providing this for their employees. What I also loved about this is Apple in recent years has been making this big push towards being more sustainable and more environmentally conscious and what they did – and this was kind of a footnote in the article – but they actually work to find the appropriate materials that would filter the air while not disrupting supplies of medical, personal protective equipment. So they went out and they found materials that weren’t going to be used in the N95 mask and the masks that were used in hospital settings and instead identify different materials so they didn’t negatively impact the supply chain in the medical world, which I thought was, again, Apple kind of going above and beyond and thinking through these things.

Dan Gingiss (18:36):
Yeah, I really like that. And it’s kind of rare from a technology hardware company, right? That is using all sorts of materials that we don’t have any idea whether we can reuse or recycle or what they do to the earth. And so I like that in this particular case, they were thoughtful about that. And that has been, you know, one of the controversies that has come out of the pandemic is, as companies are trying to obtain PPE for their employees, certainly at different times in the last few months that may or may not have come at the expense of getting PPE to our frontline workers, who, and our medical workers who probably need it more. And it is a little bit of a disturbing trade-off. So I kind of liked that Apple sort of stepped aside and said, okay, we’re not going to get involved in that. We’re going to let all the, the PPE go to the first responders and we’re going to come up with a different way.

Joey Coleman (19:34):
I agree. And interestingly enough, earlier in the pandemic, Apple made a face shield for medical workers and distributed millions of other masks across the healthcare sector. They had a huge stockpile of masks that they had acquired over the years since their headquarters in California. And they were dealing with some air quality issues. So they actually are all about paying attention to these things. And so now they not only have these new face mask, but they’re also sourcing some clear masks.

Dan Gingiss (20:05):
And you’re about to tell us what a clear mask is, right?

Joey Coleman (20:08):
I am Dan, and this is where this story gets particularly interesting and takes it to another level. So the clear mask has all the properties of irregular protective face mask, but instead of covering the mouth with cloth, it has a clear shield that allows people to see the wearer’s full face. So people who are deaf or hard of hearing can understand better because they can read the lips. Now clear mask is the first fully transparent, FDA cleared mask, that is optimized for maximum clarity and Apple work with Gallaudet University in Washington, DC to identify solution, and then tested the clear mask with employees in their stores.

Dan Gingiss (20:52):
I love it. And as our listeners may recall, uh, we talked about a partnership between Starbucks and Gallaudet University back in episode 42, and Gallaudet specializes in educating the deaf and hard of hearing students. And it’s yet another example of a brand reaching out to the amazing educators at Gallaudet to help find creative solutions that work for every customer.

Joey Coleman (21:18):
Yeah. And you know, what’s interesting, Dan, I found that when I’m wearing a mask out in public, one of the things that is somewhat disconcerting is normally if I’m walking through a store, I would smile at the other people I’m walking by, you know, you make eye contact with someone and you express a smile or something just to be friendly. Well, when you’re wearing a mask, you can’t see that unless it’s a clear mask. So there’s the benefit for everyone wearing a clear mask. But there’s also the benefit for folks who maybe are having difficulty hearing folks. And I know I’ve certainly been in a situation where someone who’s wearing a mask is speaking to me. And it’s harder to hear what they’re saying because of the mask, the clear mask kind of solves for that problem.

Dan Gingiss (22:02):
Absolutely. And it is, I think one of the things that we’ve all missed in the last few months is that, you know, used to be that you would see somebody wearing a mask. And that was a different thing in the United States. I mean, obviously in Asian cultures, it’s been very common for a long time, but here in the US it wasn’t. And now we see them all the time. And one of the things that we’ve missed is you, you can’t see most of someone’s face, right? You, you can only read their eyes. You can’t read their whole facial expression. And certainly if you are needing to read lips or something in order to hear better, you’re, you’re kind of lost. So I think it’s a very interesting solution and I’m glad you found it.

Joey Coleman (22:42):
Well, friends, it would be great to be on the other side of this pandemic, but we’re not. And if you talk to medical professionals and look at the research globally, and that means going beyond your favorite news channel and actually exploring the global response to COVID-19, you’ll find a common thread among countries that have eliminated or dramatically reduced the COVID threat – their citizens wear masks whenever they leave their homes and interact with others in public and in the same way. So many people look to the example of Apple to model, surprise and delight for their customer experiences. Dan and I recommend that our listeners look to Apple again and see them as leading the way when it comes to mask, then go find some great mask solutions for yourself, for your team and your customers so we can all work together to eliminate this pandemic threat and get back to some really great customer experiences.

[PARTNERSHIP WITH AVTEX][Playing Experience Points – What Happened]
Joey Coleman (23:40):
You know, one of the best things about our new game show experience points is that we got to have a lot of fun creating the games that we play our partners at Avtex, who are also sponsors of the experience. This show, let us have a lot of free reign. And we collaborated together to come up with some interesting ways to talk about customer experience. So one of the games we created is called What Happened, and here’s how the game works:

Rules Hostess (24:11):
In what happened. Watch the first half of an experience story choose what you think happens next from four possible endings. And for correctly, for 500 points, if incorrect, you’ll be granted an extra life and the opportunity to answer from the remaining three endings for 250 points.

Dan Gingiss (24:32):
So I absolutely love this game because like our listeners story segment earlier on in this episode on experience, this, this is an opportunity for us to hear from other people about stories that they have had that are either good or bad customer experiences. And so they record videos for us and we get to hear their story, but only the first half of the story. And then there’s this whole mystery about what happens next and you and I got to have the fun of writing the four potential answers to what happened next.

Joey Coleman (25:07):
Absolutely. And what I love about the, the user generated listener generated stories is folks just so you know, Dan, and it was really just Dan. I think I did it once. Dan did it twice tweeted out, Hey, or, and did on Facebook and all the socials, you know, Hey, tell us your stories and here’s the rules. Tell us the first half, and then do a second video where you tell the second half, and we got dozens of submissions. And I think what it really proved is that everyone is having customer experiences, that they want to talk about. Whether those are the good experiences, the bad experiences, the ugly experiences, or the exceptional experiences, they want to share their story. And so not only is this a fun way to incorporate listener generated stories into the game, but it’s really interesting to see how many of our celebrity contestants and, oh, we’ve got an amazing lineup of celebrity customer experience experts, what they think the answers are because there’s that interesting dance between, well, what the answer should be versus what do you think actually happened.

Dan Gingiss (26:11):
or what I hope it would be? And that’s the fun, right? We often get the person cause they’re a lot of them have been involved in customer experience. They’re saying, well, gosh, I really hope that they took great care of them. And it was a fantastic experience. But this answer over here sounds so much more typical. And of course we’ve inserted that answer on purpose because it sounds typical. And I know we sound a little, like, what’s the word that I’m looking for here where we’re trying to trick people, but it’s really just, we’re trying to have, we’re trying to make customer experience fun. And I think we’ve really succeeded with this show.

Joey Coleman (26:45):
So friends, if you want to find out What Happened and not just the game, what happened, but also what happens in general on experience points, go check out the show. You can find this on YouTube. You can find us as a podcast. You can go to experience points, game that’s ExperiencePointsGame.com and see our celebrity contestants. See videos, listen to the game, come check it out. If you like the experience, this show sponsored by our great partners at Avtex. I think you’re really going to love experience points the game from our friends today.

[SEGMENT INTRO – CX PRESS]
Joey Coleman (27:24):
There are so many great customer experience articles to read, but who has the time we summarize them and offer clear takeaways you can implement starting tomorrow. Enjoy this segment of CX Press, where we read the articles so you don’t need to!

[CX PRESS][TikTok + DoggFace + Ocean Spray + Fleetwood Mac = Viral Video]
Joey Coleman (27:42):
Alright Dan, what do skateboarding, Fleetwood, Mac and ocean spray have in common?

Dan Gingiss (27:48):
Okay. I have no clue at all.

Joey Coleman (27:55):
I was actually hoping you would have no clue. I felt like there was a 50/50 chance here. You’re either going to know exactly what I was talking about, or you were going to have no idea what I was talking about. And I got to tell ya, I’m thrilled that it’s no idea.

Dan Gingiss (28:08):
I mean, obviously I know what those three things are separately, but I have no idea what they have in common, our audience.

Joey Coleman (28:15):
So, so let me explain a little bit about this. If folks haven’t had the chance to see this yet. So this is an evolving story in experience marketing, vitality and empathy, which you can read more about in the inc com article by Justin Brisso titled ocean spray just gave the viral skateboarding, TikTok guy, an extraordinary gift. It’s a lesson in emotional intelligence. Now here’s what happened a few weeks ago. Nathan “Dogface” Apadaca was on his way to the potato warehouse where.

Dan Gingiss (28:51):
hold on a minute.

Joey Coleman (28:53):
This is so great. There is so many fabulous pizza that says an actual story, an actual, honest to goodness story. And let me tell you, by the time I am done with this story, it is so beautifully surreal and fabulous that you couldn’t replicate it. And that’s part of the reason why it’s so incredible.

Dan Gingiss (29:10):
I just want to remind you though, before you go on that so far, you have mentioned the viral skateboarding, Tik TOK guy, some dude named dog face. And he was of course on his way to a potato warehouse.

Joey Coleman (29:22):
I know it’s just like this story. You would think I’m making it up. But folks, to my knowledge, every piece of this story is true. All right. So a few weeks ago, Nathan face Apodaca was on his way to the potato warehouse where he works in Idaho when his 2000 Dodge Durango gave out on him now, because he didn’t want to be late for work. Nathan grabbed his skateboard – or longboard for all of you, aficionados listening – and as he skated down the highway, he decided to film a quick video of himself, sipping on a big bottle of ocean spray, cranberry juice and lip sinking to the Fleetwood Mac classic Dreams. Now what happened after this (as if that wasn’t incredible enough) what happened after this is the video which he uploaded to TikTok went viral and it racked up millions of views. In fact, as we’re recording this right now, over 60.8 million views, people started filming their own recreations of the video, including Fleetwood Mac and all of this led to a ton of free advertising for ocean spray, because remember he’s drinking the Ocean Spray, cranberry juice, but instead of just saying, thanks or taking advantage of all this free press, the folks at Ocean Spray decided to do something special. So first they partnered with a local Nissan dealership to give Nathan a new and get this folks cranberry red Nissan Frontier pickup truck. It’s so good. And then they filled the cargo bed with jugs of cranberry juice. And there’s the ocean sprays CEO, Tom Hayes noted quote. When we saw Nathan’s video and the joy it created, we knew we needed to celebrate him and the happiness he spurred. We were humbled to gift him something of importance to him, a truck we knew he needed.

Dan Gingiss (31:23):
You know, I love this so much because earlier on in this season, Episode 106, for those scoring at home, you talked about a, another TicTok video about an employee from Chick-fil-a and Chick-fil-a’s response was not quite as positive as Ocean Sprays. And I think what’s great about this is that ocean spray could have just put on their marketing hats and tried to capitalize on the surprise virality, like so many other brands have done, but instead they showcased how brands could and frankly should use emotional intelligence to connect with their customers. And so, as it turns out in an early interview with TMZ, Nathan shared that his Durango while having over 330,000 miles on it just, and I quote, shuts off sometimes

Joey Coleman (32:18):
As, as vehicles that have over 330,000 miles are want to do sometimes, right? And so when it came time to acknowledge all this great free publicity ocean spray did more than say, thank you. They actually showed their thanks.

Dan Gingiss (32:35):
And this, similar to the Chik-fil-a story led to even more publicity, Nathan made a second video driving his new truck while, what do you think he was drinking Joey?

Joey Coleman (32:46):
That would be Ocean Spray cranberry juice.

Dan Gingiss (32:48):
That would be Ocean Spray cranberry juice. And that new video has already racked up as of this recording, nearly 28 million views.

Joey Coleman (32:59):
It’s insane. And to fully bring this story full circle, Ocean Spray’s CEO created his own version of the video in an effort to quote, keep the vibe going.

Dan Gingiss (33:12):
And I love that because there is nothing better than a CEO acting human, right? It is so true. I mean, we see these frankly, mostly guys, you know, dressed up in their suits in front of the microphone, doing a quarterly earnings statement, very serious. Exactly. And it’s very rare that you just see them in blue jeans or shorts, you know, being a person with their family. And, and I love, I mean, there are not a lot of CEOs that would have been bold enough to go and shoot their own video. Very few I’d say of the fortune 500, I dunno, less than 10, you think would probably be willing to do it.

Joey Coleman (33:55):
I was going to guess five, but definitely less than 10 because you run the risk of, you know, well, that’s not what we’re supposed to look like. And here’s the point – friends we’re living in an era where the more real you are, the more attention that garners. You know, I think we are hopefully knock on wood, moving beyond the era of everything being hyper scripted and PR you know, quaffed and, you know, figured out in a way that everybody’s like, Oh, here’s the prepared scene and the scripted move. It’s like, no even reality TV. People are getting bored with reality TV because they’ve come to realize that reality TV shows are scripted. And that’s what made this video so fascinating and what it made it stand out. Because, I mean, this is the guy who works at the potato warehouse, right. And he’s just shooting this video.

Dan Gingiss (34:51):
I so want some videos of the potato warehouse, cause I’m imagining right now. And I, I, I mean, it’s just great.

Joey Coleman (34:57):
Yeah, it’s great. And the, the ripple effect, no pun intended on this was crazy because Fleetwood Mac released to the song Dreams 43 years ago. And this week where we’re, when we’re recording dreams was number three on the billboard charts. Like this is the song that was popular 43 years ago. And people have heard it plenty since then, but it’s like, it just skyrocketed the popularity and Fleetwood Mac is like, you know, and they’ve done some interviews with him where he’s just, Oh my gosh, like, this is an amazing experience. And we love it. And we love the energy behind it. And it wasn’t done for commercial purposes and it wasn’t a scheme and it wasn’t to try to bring something back. It was pure fun and music and joy and skateboarding down the highway to get to work LA jug and, you know, while drinking a jug of ocean spray. I mean, it’s just everything about this was what viral videos in my opinion should be about.

Dan Gingiss (36:06):
Yeah, absolutely. And I have to say having two kids, one of whom is quite active on TikTok. It is amazing that one of the results of TikTok becoming popular is that my kids know music from many, many generations. And I there’s been several times where my son or daughter will start singing along to a classic rock song. And I’m like, where do you know this? From the answers TikTok, because a lot, because all these videos are set to music and, and somehow some way a song like Fleetwood, Mac’s just shows up. And now everybody knows that song. And it’s it’s number three 43 years after it’s released. I think that’s a good thing. And it’s one of the positives that I think that platform has brought to society.

Speaker 2 (36:52):
Well, and that may be the one of the first times that a parent has ever sung the praises of Tik TOK. I love it, Dan. And it’s so true. I mean, our youngest son who is four the other day, I saw him walk by the Alexa and he said, Alexa, play, I Love Rock and Rroll by Joan Jett and the Blackhearts. Right? And it’s like, how does he know this song was decades before he was born? And it’s the exposure to the music. It creates connection. It’s a nostalgia for the parents. I love every bit about it. So what can we learn about this example, this story? Well, we can learn that Joey’s actually doing a decent job staying up on the TikTok kids to Joey stories from social media. Okay. But seriously, what can we learn about the confluence of Nathan’s TikTok video and Fleetwood Mac’s playful participation and Ocean Spray’s empathetic gifting? Well, what we can learn is that people are thirsting for human connection. We love a feel-good fun, loving story. And while it’s impossible to know whether or not something is going to go viral, when we film it, our reaction afterwards is much easier to design. So look for opportunities to reward and acknowledge your advocates. If someone’s going to sing your praises, whether that’s figuratively or literally look for ways to thank them, that move the dial for them in the same way that they move the dial for you. Somebody leaves you a positive review on Amazon. Go thank them. Shout them out. Somebody kind enough to comment about you on social, acknowledge that and throw the gift back to them. So in the now famous words of Nathan dog face Apodaca, we can all just keep the vibe going.

Dan Gingiss (38:30):
And me? I’m going to get some cranberry juice.

[SHOW OUTRO]
Joey Coleman (38:38):
Wow. Thanks for joining us for another episode of Experience This!

Dan Gingiss (38:42):
We know there are tons of podcasts to listen, to magazines and books to read, reality TV to watch. We don’t take for granted that you’ve decided to spend some quality time listening to the two of us.

Joey Coleman (38:52):
We hope you enjoyed our discussions. And if you do, we’d love to hear about it. Come on over to ExperienceThis Show.com and let us know what segments you enjoyed, what new segments you’d like to hear. This show is all about experience, and we want you to be part of the Experience This Show.

Dan Gingiss (39:10):
Thanks again for your time. And we’ll see you next week for more

Joey Coleman (39:13):
Experience

Dan Gingiss (39:15):
This!