Episode 109 – Enhancing the Experience with Efficiency and Effectiveness

Join us as we discuss using technology to know where to go, the move to telemedicine during the pandemic, and a framework for creating more content than you could possibly want.

Signage, Appointments, and Creators– Oh My!

[This Just Happened] Traffic Lights in the Bathroom?!

Things We Mentioned in This Segment:

• Chris Strub – friend of the Experience This! Show and all-around great guy
Dallas Fort Worth International Airport (DFW)

[Redesign the Experience] A Doctor’s Visit Without a Waiting Room

Things We Mentioned in This Segment:

The Rise of Telemedicine During the COVID-19 Pandemic – by Dan Gingiss 

[Partnership with Avtex] Introducing the Experience Points Game Show!

Things We Mentioned in This Segment:

• Avtex
• Experience Points

[What Are You Reading?] Create Limitless Amounts of Content

Things We Mentioned in This Segment:

The Content Fuel Framework: How to Generate Unlimited Story Ideas – by Melanie Deziel

Host Contact Information

Email Dan: Dan@dangingiss.com

Tweet Dan Gingiss: @DGingiss

Email Joey: JoeyC@JoeyColeman.com

DanGingiss.com

JoeyColeman.com

Subscribe to Experience This on Apple Podcasts

Episode Transcript

Download an unedited transcript of Episode 109 here or read it below:

[SHOW INTRO]
Dan Gingiss (00:05):
Welcome to Experience This!

Joey Coleman (00:08):
Where you’ll find inspiring examples of customer experience, great stories of customer service, and tips on how to make your customers love you even more!

Dan Gingiss (00:18):
Always upbeat and definitely entertaining, customer retention expert Joey Coleman…

Joey Coleman (00:23):
and social media expert, Dan Gingiss – serve as your hosts for a weekly dose of positive customer experience.

Dan Gingiss (00:31):
So hold on to your headphones… It’s time to Experience This!

[EPISODE 109 INTRO]
Dan Gingiss (00:35):
Get ready for another episode of the Experience This! Show!

Joey Coleman (00:46):
Join us as we discuss using technology to solve an age old problem of knowing where to go, the move to telemedicine during the pandemic, and a framework for creating more content than you could possibly want.

Dan Gingiss (01:03):
Signage, appointments, and creators… Oh my!

[SEGMENT INTRO – THIS JUST HAPPENED]
Joey Coleman (01:09):
We love telling stories and sharing key insights you can implement – or avoid – based on our experiences. Can you believe that This Just Happened?!

[THIS JUST HAPPENED][Traffic Lights in the Bathroom?!]
Dan Gingiss (01:23):
So a good friend of mine, and friend of the Experience This! Show – Chris Strub – was actually traveling recently, he’s one of my few friends to be traveling, he has been going around to a few places to do his Giving Days that he hosts to raise money for charity. And he was walking through the Dallas Fort Worth airport. And I was pleased that he thought of me, maybe us, if you will, possibly…

Joey Coleman (01:49):
Well, let’s be honest, it was you – Strub! I’m taking this personally. I know Strub too, but no, no, no – I’m going to save my remarks… Go ahead, Dan!

Dan Gingiss (01:57):
Anyway, he thought of me and decided to tweet at me and said, “Never in the history of Twitter has a tweet been more likely to appear in a future @dgingiss CX keynote, then this bit of scatalogical brilliance” and he had a laugh out loud emoji. He then included three pictures, which I want to describe to our audience because I think he might be right now.

Joey Coleman (02:26):
Now before we describe them to the audience, Strub, I’m gonna forgive you for not including me in this tweet – he knows us well enough to know that I’m not on the Twitters. So, but thanks for getting it towards us. Yes, it probably will show up in a Dan Gingiss CX keynote but guess what, buddy, it’s showing up on the Experience This! Show as well!.

Dan Gingiss (02:45):
Exactly. So when you pass by the restrooms at Dallas Fort Worth Airport, you’re greeted with a, what looks like a pretty big, maybe 32″ television screen turned on its side, so it’s vertical.

Joey Coleman (03:02):
It’s a giant iPad!

Dan Gingiss (03:04):
Well, huge! Anyway, there’s one for men and one for women – as indicated by the internationally well-known man and woman signs. And it notes how many stalls are available in the bathroom, and how long it will take to walk to the next bathroom. And in the examples that he showed us, it just so happens, that there were four stalls available in the men’s room and two in the women’s room – which sounds about right, because you know, it’s always a, a longer wait for the women’s room, but then when you walk in, there are lights that are above each one of the stalls that are either green or red – to tell you which ones are occupied and which ones aren’t. And it kind of reminds me, I’ve seen those at parking garages before, but I’ve never seen one in a bathroom. And I thought it was pretty cool. So I appreciated him sharing it. What did you think Mr. Coleman?

Joey Coleman (04:02):
You know, it wouldn’t be a “Dan Gingiss episode” of Experience This if we didn’t have some mention of course, across the season, of a bathroom experience. So thank you, Chris Strub for pointing Dan in the direction so we could have the Season Six bathroom experience story!

Dan Gingiss (04:21):
Wait a minute, are you saying this just because I have not one, not two, but potentially three different bathroom stories that I tell in my keynotes?

Joey Coleman (04:29):
You know, let’s just say it’s clear that the bathroom experience is part of the experience and you stumble across a lot of remarkable ones. I actually found this one to be fairly remarkable for a couple reasons. Number one – when you are using the bathroom, the idea of someone knocking on the door is not super exciting. When you are using a bathroom in an airport, there are people that are trying to quickly use the bathroom and move on to their flight, so speed is probably at a more, a higher premium, in a bathroom setting in an airport then maybe in any other type of bathroom. And so the fact that they have almost a traffic light system of like, “Hey, you’re good to go on this one, not to go on that one,” I actually thought was pretty creative and it kind of speaks to something we talk a lot about on the show, which is – thinking about how you can deliver convenience to your customers. Now, in this case, the customer is the person needing to use the restroom. And obviously the organization is the Dallas Airport and they’ve made a technology investment to help move things along. What I also loved – the green and red lights, that was great – but I also loved the arrow pointing you in the direction of the next closest bathroom and telling you how long it would take you to walk there. Because especially if you’ve not been to an airport before, one of the things you’re often wondering like, well, if I don’t use this one, how far do I have to go? Is it before my gate? Or is it after my next gate? And am I going to have to walk past it? Et cetera. There’s a lot of stuff that’s going on and I think in a world where travel, as a general premise for many people, is a stressful experience, anything you can do to increase the convenience and the ease for your customers – while they’re already in a heightened, stressful state – is going to be a good thing.

Dan Gingiss (06:21):
Yeah. What I thought was interesting here was this seemed to be a combination of things that we’ve seen in other places. So I mentioned that I had seen it, and I’m sure you have too, in parking garages – which is a nice touch to tell you, “Hey, this parking garage is full” or “it has only three more spaces left.” And then there’s the lights over the different parking stalls to tell you which are available and which aren’t we also talked about. And you’re going to be very disappointed with Rain Man because I can’t find the episode in my brain, but we did an episode.

Joey Coleman (06:53):
Hang on ladies and gentlemen, I have to pick myself back up, I just fell over. Dan Gingiss is about to reference a past episode of Experience This! and he doesn’t know the call sign number. Hopefully some of you remember the episode number and can write in and let us know what it was.

Dan Gingiss (07:07):
Yes. Well, it was the episode where we talked about, I believe it was an entire episode about our experiences in London, I think? Or did we do one about, there was one where we did an international episode and in all of the experiences were about traveling… You had a massage and a haircut…

Joey Coleman (07:26):
It was in London, in the Heathrow Airport, yes!

Dan Gingiss (07:27):
So in that same episode, we also talked about how there were signs for security that told you how long each of the lines had to wait. So if you went to the South Security, it was a 15 minute wait, but the North Security only had 10 minute wait or something like that, and we thought that was really cool. So we’ve seen the kind of “how long you have to wait” thing in other places as well and then also, when you walk through an airport, you often see the signs that say “Next Eating Area – three minutes walk,” or it’ll show you all of the restaurants and how long it takes to walk there, and so I liked – as you pointed out – the little arrow that kinda said, “well, you can, uh, you know, you can wait for two more minutes and walk to the next one. Even better might’ve been to say that the next one had more stalls available, right? Because if you took the walk and then, and then it was busier, it might be frustrating…

Joey Coleman (08:24):
So true. So true, huge opportunity for the upgrade in the experience there, which I think brings up an interesting point Dan. The best experiences around, in many ways, are pirated from other industries and brought in your industry. And it’s one of the reasons why we decided when we created the Experience This! Show to talk about every possible industry under the sun, because our hope is that our listeners can hear one story and say, “that’s not my industry, but I could do something similar in my industry and it would stand out, it would be remarkable, it would be different!” And I agree with you giving someone a preview of what they might find when they make that walk, would be a great way to make it even more beneficial to the person looking at the sign.

Dan Gingiss (09:09):
So I think that’s a great segue to the takeaway here, which is, look, you may not even have bathrooms because you may be a completely digital business. So it’s not about the bathrooms. It’s about giving customers the information that they need to make the decisions that they need to make. And in this particular case, it has to do with, am I going to go to the bathroom now? Or am I going to walk further to another one? But the indicators, the signage, and the indicators, and the technology that’s used to track that, can be used in lots of other different places. And I urge you to think in your business of where your customers may be waiting, or may have to make a decision, that you can help them by just providing them with a little bit more information.

[SEGMENT INTRO – REDESIGN THE EXPERIENCE]
Joey Coleman (09:53):
With a pandemic sweeping the globe and shifting the way organizations interact with their customers, many of the old ways of operating just don’t work anymore. As we all navigate a COVID-19 world, it’s time to Redesign the Experience.

[REDESIGN THE EXPERIENCE][A Doctor’s Visit Without a Waiting Room]
Dan Gingiss (10:12):
Amid a global pandemic and stay at home orders in almost every state, most businesses have had to pivot to a virtual existence. Now in a healthcare industry, this means a much higher dependence on telemedicine, which is also called tele- health in some spaces. And that has both doctors and patients adapting. Doctors, therapists, dentists, even veterinarians, have shifted appointments to virtual settings as a means to triage health issues and provide non-emergency care to patients. Now I wrote about this in a blog for our friends and sponsors of the Experience This! Show – Avtex – and thought that we should also talk about it here on the Experience This! Show, because I found it to be a really interesting dynamic that has evolved out of the pandemic, that I think has a lot of impact both within the healthcare industry, of course, but also to businesses outside it.

Joey Coleman (11:12):
Well, and at the risk of, you know, putting the cart before the horse – or what’s the opposite of burying the lead? the reveal? – this may be something that is good, that has come from the pandemic. I mean, I don’t want to give away kind of where we’re taking the conversation, but I generally think this shift is a positive one.

Dan Gingiss (11:31):
Well, yeah. And we’ve talked about that several times this season that some of the changes that we’ve seen during COVID are (a) going to become permanent and (b) are positive improvements. And so if there is a silver lining to what has been a pretty lousy experience overall for everybody over the last six/seven months is that there are some positive experiences – customer experience or in this case, patient experience – coming out of it. So as I started investigating this, I did an informal survey of my friends and connections on Facebook. And I just asked people, “Have you used telemedicine? And if so, where?” And I was amazed at the results! People came back and said that they had virtual appointments with allergists, behavioral therapists, dermatologists, ears, nose, and throat doctors, mental health professionals, occupational therapists, ophthalmologists, orthopedists, physical therapists, neurosurgeons, and of course, their primary care provider.

Joey Coleman (12:27):
Well, I don’t know if this means that you have a lot of friends on Facebook, Dan, or if your friends have got some serious health issues! Are they just sickly folks?! No, I think, I think it’s probably the former (obviously I’m being facetious) but I think what’s fascinating here is we’ve got a lot of different types of medicine that I would posit prior to March or April of this year, people hadn’t considered that telehealth or the telemedicine solution, or if they had wanted that their provider didn’t offer it. I

mean, I shared earlier in the season – and I’ll steal one from you, Dan, I think it was Episode 103 – my wife’s experience with the eye doctor and being able to snap a photo of her eye and text it to the eye doctor and say, “Hey, what is this? What’s going on?” And the doctor being able to say, “Hey, guess what? It’s okay, it’s fine. It’s, you know, it’ll resolve itself in a week or so. And if it doesn’t let me know and you can come in and see me.” But just that ability to immediately get an expert assessment of the situation – without needing to get in the car and drive there, without needing to make an appointment, without needing to run the risk of exposing ourselves or the providers to COVID. I mean, the convenience alone is incredibly valuable…

Dan Gingiss (13:44):
It’s something you’d be willing to pay for in the future…

Joey Coleman (13:47):
100%! Let me tell you, I actually texted the provider afterwards and I said, “Send me a bill. Seriously!” And he was like, “No, Joey, it’s all good. We’ve been your eye doctor for years. Don’t sweat it. We’ll see you next time we see you for your regular annual checkup,” but it was so convenient that I found myself compelled as a patient or as a customer to say, “just bill me,” because I really appreciated the speedy response time.

Dan Gingiss (14:13):
Well, and you’re right, that a lot of these types of doctors have had to move here very quickly. I talked to someone who worked for a large, multi-state dermatology practice, and he told me that just in his organization, they saw telemedicine appointments jump from 10 to 20 per month before the pandemic, to more than 500 per day after the pandemic started.

Joey Coleman (14:41):
That, that’s like, that’s not even hockey stick growth… That’s rocket ship growth!

Dan Gingiss (14:44):
That is rocket ship growth.

Joey Coleman (14:47):
The crazy thing is, when that happens, it really pushes the bounds of the tech team who’s helping provide that. You know, I actually was talking to somebody who oversees technology for a major hospital provider and they had kind of a similar assessment and the way he described it, is he said, “Joey – we took our next six years of plans for rolling out telehealth and telemedicine and we implemented them in under 90 days.” And what this meant is his team was just slammed, and working, and to be candid – and I won’t mention any names – he said the hardest part was getting the doctors on board. The patients were ready, the patients were excited and like, didn’t need a lot of explanation. It was convincing the doctors that the image they had of themselves as being the kind of person who has people in, who have people in the waiting room, waiting them to see them could be sacrificed for speed, efficiency, safety, ease of use, a seamless experience, et cetera. Like all the benefits, but maybe a little bit of the less of the status or, you know, or at least that’s the way it was perceived in, uh, in his medical community he was working with.

Dan Gingiss (16:03):
It’s an interesting perspective that I hadn’t really thought of… But the folks that I talked to – and I talked to doctors, dentists, and even a veterinarian, two veterinarians actually – and they all reported positive patient experiences, which obviously is why we’re talking about it. But most importantly, they also reported successful clinical outcomes. So what that means is patients are getting their problems solved, like your wife did with her eye via telemedicine, it’s convenient, it’s fast, and it is been a really good experience – both from the clinical side and from the patient experience side. So I think it’s fascinating. And I mean, I was talking to my friend, who’s a veterinarian and I’m like, “How does this even work? Your patient can’t talk!”

Joey Coleman (16:54):
Right? It’s like, you know, “Buffy, what’s wrong with you? Bark girl! Bark!” You know, I mean, it’s, it’s, it’s a challenging concept, but let’s be honest, I think it’s the reality. I mean, I’ve got to ask you, Dan, what, what do you think? I mean, do you think this is a trend that is going to move from being a trend to being the reality that it’s here to stay? Or is this just kind of a COVID-era novelty or anomaly?

Dan Gingiss (17:19):
Well, I think this is a great question and I actually did ask, uh, both a doctor, friend and a vet friend. And before I tell you what they say, I thought it’d be fun, joy if you, and I just kind of volley back and forth a little bit on some of the advantages of telehealth or telemedicine of which I think there are many. And also, let’s just be honest with our audience. There are some disadvantages too, and maybe those are things that end up getting fixed. Maybe they’re not, but we’re still kind of early days here. So, you know, when to, off on the advantages, we talked about convenience. So I think that is really an obvious one. There’s also this issue of accessibility, which I thought was really interesting. And that might be for patients that want to visit a doctor in another state that they maybe wouldn’t have had access to before. Maybe there’s a specialist or something like that. And I thought that was kind of interesting that I, that I hadn’t thought about. And relatedly is there are different communities in particular, I would say the elderly community, which sometimes has difficulty obtaining transportation to a doctor’s appointment. And now that becomes completely unnecessary. And so that becomes more accessible for them as well.

Joey Coleman (18:32):
Oh, Dan, I totally agree with you and I’ll take it one step further. You know, what about those who are, you know, not in a position to have their own vehicle, right? So that they’re, they’re run into transportation concerns and they’re used to taking the bus and they may have to take a bus for four hours to get from one side of town, to the other, jumping from bus to bus, to bus, to get to a medical provider. It’s easier just not to go. And what’s fascinating is when we think of telemedicine, you know what originally came out of the idea of doing these things over the phone? Well, the reality is more Americans and more people globally are walking around with their phone in their pocket or in their purse today than at any other time in human history. And the reach, if you will, of a cell phones into lower economic communities is much higher than one might otherwise expect. So there is a huge access piece of this that comes along. This isn’t only good for the patients though. This is good for the doctors. I mean, there’s a much higher efficiency and seamlessness that they can move through the potential revenue for a doctor increases dramatically. Because if you think about just even if you’re a non doctor and you think how now in the COVID era, you jump from Zoom call to Zoom to Zoom call, and you might crank out four calls where if you were getting in the car and going around and doing sales appointments or marketing calls or whatever it may be or visits, you know, it would take you a day. You can do four before lunch. And I think doctors, it’s the same thing. They can be much more efficient and increase the number of patients that they interact with in a given time period.

Dan Gingiss (20:03):
You know, I love that you said that Joey, because, uh, one of the things that I talked about in my book was about how Uber solved the problem for both passengers and for drivers. And that’s why it was so successful in, in disrupting. And I think you’re absolutely right here and I’ll go one step further that besides from helping patients and helping doctors get also helps the system because it reduces unnecessary visits for non-emergencies, right? You have people that go to the doctor or go or worse, go to the emergency room for things that they don’t really need to. And that then by reducing those, that frees up those resources for the people who really need them who are really experiencing an emergency. So whenever you have a situation where basically it’s a win, win, win, that is generally the kind of disruption that is going to last. And that I think generally we now welcome.

Joey Coleman (20:58):
Absolutely. And I mean, let’s be honest that the ER piece of this is huge. If you look at the amount of emergency room visits that are for things that are not emergencies, and that’s either because they’re dealing with a patient who’s uninsured or under insured, or doesn’t have a primary care physician, or doesn’t feel that they can make their schedule work to get an appointment three weeks from now. So they just go into the ER, whenever it’s available. I mean, this led to the proliferation of urgent care centers. But I think when we think about telemedicine and telehealth, that takes it to an entirely different level. It’s like, you know, the age old, a TV ad. If you have a phone, you have a lawyer. It’s like, if you have a phone, you have a doctor. And I think that’s actually better for our society than if you have a phone, you have a lawyer.

Dan Gingiss (21:46):
Sure, exactly. So quickly let’s cover a couple of the disadvantages because there definitely are some. You pointed out one, I think earlier, which is that there is a cost to doctors or hospitals for purchasing new equipment, integrating technology into existing systems, making ensuring privacy and security training doctors and staff. So, you know, while a lot of organizations have been able to stand this up really, really quickly, it is not without expense, both dollars and time resources.

Joey Coleman (22:21):
Well, and this is a, you know, just as a little aside, you know, one of the challenges that exist in a lot of hospitals today is the confluence between HIPAA (the major regulation here in the United States around healthcare privacy) and technology. And interestingly enough, one of the ways that shows up is if you have a computer screen in the office where there are going to be patients or other people, it is set to log out or to force you to type in your name and password on a much faster rate than the typical computer you use in an office setting. So there there’s, you know, kind of, for lack of a better way of putting it behavioral challenges that have to be adopted as well. And, you know, I mentioned the lawyers in the last comment and I say this as a recovering lawyer, we’re going to need a dramatic rewrite of most of the laws as it relates to healthcare and privacy if we are going to make the move to telemedicine that I think most patients want to move to. And I think most doctors probably as well, another challenge, I think that ties into this, that I alluded to earlier with, you know, the veterinarian scenario is not being able to examine patients physically. I don’t know about you Dan, but there’s plenty of times where I go into the doctor where it’s not enough to say, Hey doc, what does this look like to you? Right. They’re poking it. They’re prodding it. They’re doing there. You know, there there’s more physical interaction than would be available over a screen call.

Dan Gingiss (23:53):
Oh, absolutely. For sure. And, and there, I mean, just like any experience, nothing replaces being there in person, and there are definitely going to be health issues in which you have to do that. It’s interesting that you mentioned HIPAA. I am one of the few people in the world that has actually read that entire privacy policy.

Joey Coleman (24:12):
I’m sorry, Dan, we got to get you a better life.

Dan Gingiss (24:15):
I know it’s tough, but it’s just a fun fact about it. It also doesn’t even mention social media and has not been updated since the advent of social media. So when you talk about technology, I mean, social media now is, I don’t know how many years old, but let’s call it North of 10 and there are no rules around this. And so as we continue to build on the technology and now we’ve got tele medicine, at some point, this stuff is going to have to be updated,

Joey Coleman (24:42):
Not to mention the number of people who happily violate their own privacy. As it relates to health care all day, every day. If I had a dollar for every time, I saw somebody on Facebook post a photo of some rash or bruise and say, Hey, does anybody have a guess what this is? And I’m just like, you’re going to crowd source via Facebook, an assessment of a medical issue. And invariably, you know, there’ll be some picture of somebody and it just looks terrible and nasty and oozing puss and it’s bad. And people are chiming in like, go see a doctor, stop asking your ex boyfriend from high school, for his opinion about what this is, unless that person happens to be a medical professional, don’t do it. So, yeah, there’s definitely a lot of downsides, but I think the interesting thing is we could have made this an Agree to Disagree episode, but I be willing to bet that the problem was we would have both ended up in the same camp, which is we agree that telehealth is a good thing. We agree that it is a silver lining from the COVID pandemic experience. And we think it’s here to stay.

Dan Gingiss (25:47):
I totally agree. And back to the doctor and the vet that I talked to, so the doctor said, and I’m quoting, “I think telemedicine will stay with us in one form or another after the pandemic. So it makes sense to figure out how to integrate it, to improve patient care and access.” And then the veterinarian who, by the way said that one of the downfalls was, was patient’s expecting that he always be available. And he referred to that. I thought this was brilliant as “being on a leash”,

Joey Coleman (26:18):
Ladies and gentlemen, he’s here all week!

Dan Gingiss (26:19):
Yeah, it was awesome. Anyway, he said, and I quote, “This is not going away. Just like most advances in technology and our civilization. It’s only going to become more and more incorporated into our life because of technology because of convenience and because of cost. These are things that the general public wants.”

Joey Coleman (26:37):
Well, ladies and gentlemen, boys, and girls there, you have it, Dan and I, we choose to agree to agree and advise all of our listeners to consider what parts of your pandemic experience will continue when the crisis is behind us. What have you done in your business to adapt to this world where we want to do more things online versus offline, and how are you making the investments that are going to continue those type of offerings going forward? Maybe the silver lining in all of this is that as we’ve all been pushed online, some experiences like going to the Dr. May have actually gotten better and may have actually improved for good and for good. I mean, not only for our personal good, but for the longterm as well.

[PARTNERSHIP WITH AVTEX][Introducing The Experience Points Game Show]
Dan Gingiss (27:32):
Hey, everyone for this entire season, you’ve been hearing Joey and I talk about this great new project that we’re working on with our friends at Avtex. It is called the Experience Points Game Show, and it is now available for you to watch or listen to… now! We are so excited. Please go to ExperiencePointsGame.com for more information. And here is an exclusive preview:

Multiple Voices (27:54):
I’m going to say what a moment of magic. My mom is an English teacher. I’ve written six books. I’m like, no, can’t do it because we will celebrate it over and over again on the way we need them to feel. If I take care of my team, they’ll take care of the customer. B2B companies report is the number one challenge, the customer experience. That was so hard. That’s the difference. The analogy worked. The speech did not a lot of tacos. Show me the money. Let’s win some money. This is so cool. And I’m learning so much. I think that’s powerful to say our customers are expecting more than ever before. I am still ready. There’s no way. There’s no way I’m going to guess. 44% hundred dollars per Dan Gingiss.

[SEGMENT INTRO – WHAT ARE YOU READING?]
Joey Coleman (28:49):
We spend hours and hours, nose deep in books. We believe that everything you read influence, it says the experiences you create. We’re happy to answer our favorite question. What are you reading?

[WHAT ARE YOU READING][The Content Fuel Framework by Melanie Deziel]
Dan Gingiss (29:02):
Many of us, whether we are solopreneurs or employees at companies have become content creators. I personally have been doing it for quite a long time. Starting with writing more than 250 articles for my college newspaper, the daily, Pennsylvania, and today, just between the two of us, Joey, we have this podcast and a video series that we’re doing for our

friends at Aztecs. I have a weekly live video series that you are a guest on. We both blog. We deliver keynotes. We’ve written books. It’s a lot of content.

Joey Coleman (29:39):
It’s a lot of content. And I don’t know that I’ve ever thought of all the different ways we’re creating content, but you’re absolutely right. I mean, it seems like every day I’m busy designing new slides, or writing something new for others to consume, or shooting a little video, or even something as simple as an email or a status update or a text message or a tweet – okay, just kidding. I’m not tweeting, but you are Dan. You’re tweeting enough for both of us. And you know, let’s be honest, we’re here on episode 109 of the Experience This Show. And we’re still creating new content every single week.

Dan Gingiss (30:14):
Yeah, no kidding. I’m still stunned about that. And I do think I speak for both of us when I say that we actually believe the show has gotten better as it’s gone along.

Joey Coleman (30:23):
At least that’s the hope right listeners? That is the hope. Is that like a fine wine we’re improving with age?

Dan Gingiss (30:29):
Exactly. So we also both know that content can be in the form of marketing frequently asked questions, blogs, product information, or really anything else. It’s always an important part of the experience. And often prospects will consume many, many pages of a website, for example, before deciding to do business with a new company. So that’s why I was interested in my friend, Melanie Deziel’s new book, The Content Fuel Framework: How to Generate Unlimited Story Ideas.

Joey Coleman (31:01):
Wait a minute. Did you say unlimited Dan?

Dan Gingiss (31:04):
I did Joey. And what I love about this book is that the framework is so darn simple. Here’s Melanie to tell us a little bit more about it.

Melanie Deziel (31:14):
I’m Melanie diesel, the chief content officer of story fuel and author of the content fuel framework, how to generate unlimited story ideas. The content field framework is a book for creators and marketers of any kind who have found themselves southernly needing to come up with tons of content ideas when maybe they didn’t have the training to do that. I use my background as a journalist to share my framework for how you can come up with an unlimited number of story ideas. The framework is simple and easy to use, and it’s made up of just two things. The focus, what is your content about and the format? How do you bring that content to life? The book is packed with tons of examples. It gives 10 different focuses you should consider and 10 different formats to start you off. In each chapter of this. Easy to read book has tons of examples showing you how this would come to life for businesses and solopreneurs of all types. My goal with the book is that if you read it – and I promise it’s a quick and easy read – you will find that you have a deep well of creativity inside of you. That you can activate whenever you need. Whenever you need something to post on your blog, to share on your social media platforms, a new video, you need to create a campaign you need to plan for a client… It doesn’t matter what you’re creating content for or why it only matters that you understand you have the tools you need to come up with content ideas. Whenever you need to. The book is, as I promise, an easy read and it’s packed with useful information prompts and all kinds of helpful resources and tips to help you get started. I really believe that if you read this book, you can go ahead and create hundreds. If not thousands of content ideas at the drop of a hat whenever you need to. So if that’s something that would benefit you and your business, please check out The Content Fuel Framework: How to Generate Unlimited Story Ideas by Melanie Deziel.

Dan Gingiss (33:08):
So, as Melanie mentioned, the framework has 10 focuses, which are people, basics, details, history, process, curation, data, product, examples, and opinions, and also 10 formats, which are writing infographics, audio, video, live video image, galleries, timelines, quizzes, tools, and maps. And her book walks through all of the focuses and all of the formats and shows real examples of content in action for each.

Joey Coleman (33:40):
That’s a whole lot of content options and a whole lot of categories and what I really liked was audio format. Since after all we’re recording a podcast right now, Melanie says that one of the advantages of audio content is that it can be consumed while the audience is using their eyes and hands for other activities. When content is audio only, this means that you, as the creator or storyteller can tap into time when your audience would otherwise not be consuming content while they’re working out at the gym, while they’re walking the dog, getting ready for work, washing dishes, which by the way, that’s my favorite one folks) or on their daily commute.

Dan Gingiss (34:19):
I’m wondering how many listeners ears perked up right now? Because you just said what it was that they were doing.

Joey Coleman (34:27):
Literally, we probably just described what you were doing. You know, we didn’t say sitting in a chair, just listening to the melodic tones of our voices talking about customer experiences. No, you’re probably doing something else. You’re multitasking, but this is kind of the good multitasking in that you can learn while your body’s doing, more rote activities.

Dan Gingiss (34:47):
Exactly. I also liked that Melanie used some of the less obvious formats and talked about timelines and quizzes and maps and that sort of thing. And that got me thinking differently because usually when I start to write a blog or a podcast segment, I just do it when an idea pops into my head or when I have a real life experience, I haven’t ever really thought of it this strategically before by combining that focus and that format. So check out Melanie Deziel’s book, The Content Fuel Framework: How to Generate Unlimited Story Ideas and never struggle to create content for your prospects and customers again.

[SHOW OUTRO]
Joey Coleman (35:33):
Wow. Thanks for joining us for another episode of Experience This!

Dan Gingiss (35:37):
We know there are tons of podcasts to listen to, magazines and books to read, reality TV, to watch! We don’t take for granted that you’ve decided to spend some quality time listening to the two of us.

Joey Coleman (35:47):
We hope you enjoyed our discussions. And if you do, we’d love to hear about it. Come on over to ExperienceThisShow.com and let us know what segments you enjoyed, what new segments you’d like to hear. This show is all about experience, and we want you to be part of the Experience This! Show.

Dan Gingiss (36:04):
Thanks again for your time, and we’ll see you next week for more

Joey Coleman (36:08):
Experience

Dan Gingiss (36:08):
This!