Redesign The Experience

With a pandemic sweeping the globe and shifting the way organizations interact with their customers, many of the old ways of operating just don’t work anymore. As we all navigate a COVID-19 world, it’s time to Redesign the Experience.

Episode 112 – Little Things Make a Big Difference in Customer Experience


Join us as we discuss a little touch that drew a lot of attention, the power of seeing someone’s face when they speak, and a viral sensation that brought together two classic brands..

Fretboard, Facemask, and Fleetwood – Oh My!

[Listener Stories] The Power of Little Notes

Things We Mentioned in This Segment:

Jeff Robbins, customer experience professional andExperience This! Show listener
• Fretboard Coffee
• Dave Elman, owner of Fretboard Coffee
• Submit Your Listener Story Here

[ReDesign the Experience] The Apple Mask

Things We Mentioned in This Segment:

Apple Design Teams Develop Special Face Masks for Employees – by Mark Gurman in Bloomberg.com
• KN95 Mask (N95 mask)
• Apple
Apple Mask – courtesy of Mark Gurman (Twitter: @markgurman)
Clear Mask
Gallaudet University
Episode 42, Season 2

[Partnership with Avtex] Playing Experience Points – What Happened?

Things We Mentioned in This Segment:

• Avtex
• Experience Points

[CX Press] TikTok + DoggFace + Ocean Spray + Fleetwood Mac = Viral Video

Things We Mentioned in This Segment:

Ocean Spray Just Gave Viral Skateboarding TikTok Guy an Extraordinary Gift – It’s a Lesson in Emotional Intelligence – by Justin Bariso in Inc.com
• Nathan “DoggFace” Apodaca TikTok video (original)
• Ocean Spray
• Fleetwood Mac
• Dreams by Fleetwood Mac
• Nissan Frontier Pickup
• Thank You Nissan and Ocean Spray TikTok video
• Tom Hays, CEO at Ocean Spray Cranberries
• Tom Hays TikTik video
• Billboard – Fleetwood Mac

Host Contact Information

Email Dan: Dan@dangingiss.com

Tweet Dan Gingiss: @DGingiss

Email Joey: JoeyC@JoeyColeman.com

DanGingiss.com

JoeyColeman.com

Subscribe to Experience This on Apple Podcasts

Episode Transcript

Download an unedited transcript of Episode 112 here or read it below:

[SHOW INTRO]
Dan Gingiss (00:05):
Welcome to Experience This!

Joey Coleman (00:08):
Where you’ll find inspiring examples of customer experience, great stories of customer service, and tips on how to make your customers love you even more!

Dan Gingiss (00:17):
Always upbeat and definitely entertaining customer attention expert, Joey Coleman

Joey Coleman (00:23):
and social media expert, Dan Gingiss serve as your hosts for a weekly dose of positive customer experience.

Dan Gingiss (00:30):
So hold on to your headphones, it’s time to Experience This!

[EPISODE 112 INTRO]
Joey Coleman (00:40):
Get ready for another episode of the Experience This Show!

Dan Gingiss (00:44):
Join us as we discuss a little touch that drew a lot of attention, the power of seeing someone’s face when they speak, and a viral sensation that brought together two classic brands.

Joey Coleman (00:58):
Fretboard, face mask, and Fleetwood… Oh my!

[SEGMENT INTRO – LISTENER STORIES]
Joey Coleman (01:04):
You listened to us. Now, we want to listen to you by visiting our website and sharing your remarkable customer experiences with us. We can share them with a broader audience. Now, sit back and enjoy our Listener Stories.

[LISTENER STORIES][The Power of Little Notes]
Joey Coleman (01:22):
We’ve got the best listeners in the world, don’t we Dan!

Dan Gingiss (01:25):
I could not agree with you more, Joey. I get so excited when people give us feedback and tell us how much they love the show, or they point out a specific segment. And it just makes me feel like the work that we put into this show is worth something to people and that we’re helping them. And I think that is very rewarding.

Joey Coleman (01:46):
Absolutely. And you know, we’re big fans of creating an actionable show, but we’re also big fans of the fact that we’re not the only two having experiences in the world. And we regularly get messages from our listeners where they share interesting stories about something that’s happened to them that they thought we might enjoy.

Dan Gingiss (02:06):
And we definitely enjoy them.

Joey Coleman (02:08):
Yes we do. Which is why we were thrilled to receive the following message from Jeff Robbins, a loyal listener of Experience This:

Jeff Robbins (02:17):
Dan and Joey longtime listener. First time recorder wanted to share a story with you, a kind of experience, economy type story, taking a basic commodity to making it into an experience for you. Uh, live in Columbia, Missouri. I’m a experienced professional here and coffee shop here, small little local coffee shop. When you buy a pound of coffee, you open up the package and there’s a business card in there with the name of the company on there. And then there’s on the back that says your coffee was born while we rock too. And then I’ll tell you the song and the artist. And it says, thanks for the little musical note. It’s all handwritten. It’s a great little surprise. The first I saw it, I was like blown away. And so just instantly became loyal to this local roaster and a great, great coffee. And the name of the coffee shop is Fretboard – so it has a musical vibe to it. So want to share that with you? Thanks so much. Appreciate your show.

Dan Gingiss (03:19):
Okay. First of all, I love long time listener. First time recorder, outstanding way to start your submission, Jeff. We really appreciate it. Great story. This sounds like an amazing place. Really. It means a lot to us that you are helping us find really cool experiences that are out there. Because a lot of the stories that we tell here are personal experiences or from our own friends and family. And so when we have listeners submit them, it really means a lot to us and we will share them all day long people because we love hearing about new experiences.

Joey Coleman (03:56):
Absolutely. And Dan and I were very intrigued by this story for a number of reasons which we’re going to get into, but we reached back out to Jeff to see if he could snag a photo of the insert card that he mentioned so that we could include it on the show notes at: experiencedthisshow.com, which by the way we did so you should go check it out at: experiencethisshow.com and Jeff later shared that he picked up some more Fretboard Coffee.

Joey Coleman (04:22):
That was a reminder for those of you that might be less musically inclined than others. The fret board is basically think of it as the strip of wood, where you put your fingers on a guitar, right, where you’re kind of pressing down different strings on the guitar to change the sound that’s the fret board or the fingerboard. Okay. So Jeff shared that he picked up some more Fretboard Coffee, but to his surprise, there was no song card. And Jeff was super bummed his words and decided to email the contact address on the website and the owner. Dave Elman emailed back very quickly. In fact, he replied in less than 30 minutes and here’s what the owner of fretboard coffee had to say:

Joey Coleman (05:01):
Hi Jeffrey, thanks for your email. It’s one of my favorite little touches and I’d love to keep it going. However, when the pandemic hit, we had to carefully consider every aspect of production. We decided to suspend the song cards as it was just one less thing to put into the coffee bags that could potentially introduce contamination. I realized that the risk is extremely small, but as a business, we’ve decided to take every precaution possible. We shut down to the public before it was mandated and we’ve had all staff in masks since far before it was required. Our shop is actually still closed to the public for now. We hope that we can bring the coffee cards back after things returned to normal. Please keep in touch and let us know if you have any other questions. Thanks Dave Elman owner and roaster at Fretboard Coffee.

Dan Gingiss (05:49):
Okay. First of all, you glossed over a little too quickly, the whole responded in 30 minutes thing. Cause that’s incredible. Especially the owner of the company. And I talk about being responsive all the time. I wrote about it in my first book. And it’s part of my whole theory on creating remarkable experiences is when people talk about you and they say nice things, or when they have questions or complaints, when you’re responsive, people remember that. And the fact that the owner responded in 30 minutes is incredible. And then I liked his answer too, right? It’s an honest answer. It is the, the move that they made was done for the safety of the customers. And so I read this note and I feel better about the coffee company, even though I might be missing one of my favorite aspects of it.

Joey Coleman (06:37):
Absolutely. And this is the fine line that so many businesses in the COVID era are walking. This idea that pieces of your business operations that are designed to create little touch points or little special experiences for your customers may have been called into questions, or maybe you can’t do them anymore because of the pandemic. And how are you navigating that? Now what’s interesting is Jeff – who submitted the story to us, let us know that he is pumped, that Dave will eventually bring the song card back. That being said, quote, “I appreciate his attention to the sensitivity around contamination and the effort to keep his employees and customers safe.” Now friends, let me point something out that Jeff shared that I think is the case with the majority of your customers. If you explain to them why you are doing things, and if it comes from a place of empathy and a place of consideration and care for either the customer or your employees or both, most customers will understand, most customers will say, wow, I know I’m not getting exactly what I used to get. And while that’s disappointing, thanks for making the right choice, even though it was the hard choice.

Dan Gingiss (07:54):
And I’ll add onto that, Joey, I believe firmly that right now and probably for the next six to 12 months, that safety is going to be one of the key words of customer experience. That if people don’t feel safe doing business with you, they’re going to go to your competitor. And so the fact that they’re doing this at the coffee shop to keep their customers safe and that Jeff, our listener understands that and appreciates that. I guarantee you makes him more loyal to the company and he’ll be there when they finally open up their doors again. And so safety is absolutely critical and I believe that’s going to continue even after the pandemic. I think all of us that used to laugh at call people germaphobes, we’re all germaphobes now. I don’t think the hand sanitizers going away just because the pandemic’s over, right? We’re going to want clean spaces. We’re not going to want contamination. And people are going to be more sensitive to it after going through this, this pandemic. So the safety thing is going to be a key component of the experience going forward.

Joey Coleman (09:04):
Dan, I couldn’t agree more. You know, I was doing a presentation for a group of executives the other day, and I was actually talking about Maslow’s hierarchy of needs. And at the risk of turning this into a psychology one Oh one class, most people in the business world have heard of Maslow’s hierarchy of needs. But if you haven’t, here’s a quick little refresher, it’s basically a pyramid. And the idea being as you get the needs at the base of the pyramid, you move up to the next level and then the next level. And then the next level on the top of the pyramid is something called self-actualization, which is what most businesses were offering pre-pandemic. They were offering you products and services that allowed you to create the best version of yourself. What we’ve been called to do now in a pandemic era is to go to the bottom of the pyramid: safety air, your personal security, your physiological safety, all of these elements that were prior to the pandemic, just basic Antioch up chips for human survival. That had been called into question. So I totally agree with you. Friends were at least six more months of this, if not a year of this, if not 18 more months of this, and I’m not saying of this being the full pandemic experience we’re having, but the impact that COVID-19 is having on business operations now at the risk of, you know, making this all about the pandemic, I do want to point out that Jeff shared a couple of other elements of the Fretboard experience that caught his attention and caught our attention as well. You get a free 12 ounce coffee when you purchase a bag of coffee. So when you go into the store and you buy the bag that they’re going to give you something to drink, to enjoy now so that they don’t delay the gratification until you go home and use the bag of coffee to make the coffee at home. The label that is written on the bag is handwritten as is the song card. So it has this personal touch. The espresso bar at their physical location is a beautiful giant wooden fret board. So they take the name of the brand and they’ve made it part of the fixtures in their location. And the shop is actually a garage, which makes you think about a garage band. So they are really living the experience in every touch point.

Dan Gingiss (11:20):
I love that. And it, again, that, you know, they’re appealing to obviously a certain population with that. But I think the idea of a consistent experience is one that we talk about. And it’s what defines a great customer experience. I usually use the word immersive, which is feeling the experience in your bones and understanding, and feeling that it’s consistent throughout. And so what I love is from start to finish that it’s a different kind of coffee shop that has created this immersive experience that is all around guitars and music. And I think that, you know, it is important to note that one of the key facets of that experience they had to eliminate they’ve obviously kept some of the others, but I think that this is why Jeff even noticed it, right? Because they’ve created something that is different and unique and immersive, and then when it goes away, people notice it. And so the learning here to me, one of the big learnings is that when you create an immersive experience, it is a great way for people to remember you. And we use the word remarkable here on the show all the time, meaning literally worthy of remark, because we want people to talk about your business in a positive way. And it certainly sounds like this place has done a great job of that.

Joey Coleman (12:43):
I couldn’t agree more, Dan, you know, and when we think of an immersive experience, how does our listener story from Jeff Robbins support that theory? Well, it’s the little things that matter. A small gesture employed by Fretboard Coffee, to insert a little card, telling people who purchased their coffee beans, what the roasters were listening to when making the product got Jeff’s attention. So he shared that with us, which led us to connect with Jeff, who then reconnected with Fretboard Coffee’s owner and all of this culminated in a story that we share with our listeners all over the world. Friends, we have two requests for you: number one, keep the stories coming, visit experience this show.com, navigate to the contact page, and then click on the orange button, labeled start recording, and you’ll be able to leave us a recording about some experience you’ve had. And hopefully we can play that in a future episode. And number two, if you love coffee and you want to support small businesses that are really doing their best to deliver remarkable experiences before, during, and after the COVID-19 pandemic, go to FretboardCoffee.com, that’s fretboard F R E T B O a R D coffee.com and order some coffee or some cool coffee, swag or something, help us support our listeners and their stories!

[SEGMENT INTRO – REDESIGN THE EXPERIENCE]
Joey Coleman (14:11):
With a pandemic, sweeping the globe and shifting the way organizations interact with their customers many of the old ways of operating just don’t work anymore. As we all navigate a COVID-19 world, it’s time to Redesign the Experience,

[REDESIGN THE EXPERIENCE][The Apple Mask]
Joey Coleman (14:30):
Out of curiosity Dan, how many masks would you say are in your regular rotation when you go out in public these days?

Dan Gingiss (14:38):
Oh, wow. I hadn’t actually thought of it that way. And I would say I’m not using it as a fashion statement, but I obviously have my Cubs mask. I mean, so clearly I got that one, but that one you got no, cause that’s kind of a cloth masks so I’m not enough super excited about how protective it actually is, but I have the KN95 for when I go to the grocery store, a place where I know there’s going to be a lot of people. And then I have kind of the disposable, you know, white or blue mask that, you know, I use once or twice and, and toss. But those are probably the three that you’ll see me rocking.

Joey Coleman (15:15):
Gotcha. Well, I’ve actually got four. I’ve got the N95, you know, that’s kind of the, Oh my goodness. And then I’ve got three cloth ones, a bright blue one, a dark blue one and a gray one. But after seeing a recent story on Bloomberg, I’m thinking I may need to track down another one. Now this story was all about the special face mask that Apple has designed for their employees to wear in both their corporate headquarters and their retail store environments. Now, because it’s a product designed by Apple. You can imagine there will be two key components.

Dan Gingiss (15:51):
I’m going with beautiful design and crazy prices.

Joey Coleman (15:56):
You know, Dan, you are half, right? If you go to the show notes at experience, this show.com, you can see some photos of an unboxing experience that an Apple employee shared on Twitter of all places. Ironically enough, I know, right. It was linked to in the article and I clicked through. But as you might imagine, it feels pretty familiar with the same white packaging and white product design. It’s very AirPods. So in that way, but that being said, you can’t purchase these masks. They’re only for Apple employees to wear while working at headquarters or working in their stores.

Dan Gingiss (16:34):
Well, of course I love that the company is paying attention to its employees and providing PPE to keep them safe. We know we’ve said before, we’ll say it again. Employee experience equals customer experience. If your employees are feeling safe, then they’re going to be able to make your customers feel safe. If your employees don’t feel safe, it’s a lot to ask them to try to make customers feel safe. So I love that Apple has gone above and beyond in typical Apple style and made this mask that I’m hoping you’re going to tell me at some point we can still get.

Joey Coleman (17:08):
Well, here’s the thing. We can’t get this one, but don’t worry. There’s, there’s good news at the end of the story. What I like about this is Apple did two things. Number one, you know, it’s Apple, right? So they require you to wear a uniform, which is basically a t-shirt. And I don’t know how often you go into the Apple store, damn, but the t-shirts kind of change. They’ve got different colors and different messages, and it’s all very branded and on brand in terms of the, the marketing messaging and the positioning. But I also like that they, you know, recognize that the mask has really become a fashion statement, not a fashion statement in the sense that as I alluded to at the beginning of the story, you’re picking what color you want to wear, but this idea that you’re wearing it and so they’re providing this for their employees. What I also loved about this is Apple in recent years has been making this big push towards being more sustainable and more environmentally conscious and what they did – and this was kind of a footnote in the article – but they actually work to find the appropriate materials that would filter the air while not disrupting supplies of medical, personal protective equipment. So they went out and they found materials that weren’t going to be used in the N95 mask and the masks that were used in hospital settings and instead identify different materials so they didn’t negatively impact the supply chain in the medical world, which I thought was, again, Apple kind of going above and beyond and thinking through these things.

Dan Gingiss (18:36):
Yeah, I really like that. And it’s kind of rare from a technology hardware company, right? That is using all sorts of materials that we don’t have any idea whether we can reuse or recycle or what they do to the earth. And so I like that in this particular case, they were thoughtful about that. And that has been, you know, one of the controversies that has come out of the pandemic is, as companies are trying to obtain PPE for their employees, certainly at different times in the last few months that may or may not have come at the expense of getting PPE to our frontline workers, who, and our medical workers who probably need it more. And it is a little bit of a disturbing trade-off. So I kind of liked that Apple sort of stepped aside and said, okay, we’re not going to get involved in that. We’re going to let all the, the PPE go to the first responders and we’re going to come up with a different way.

Joey Coleman (19:34):
I agree. And interestingly enough, earlier in the pandemic, Apple made a face shield for medical workers and distributed millions of other masks across the healthcare sector. They had a huge stockpile of masks that they had acquired over the years since their headquarters in California. And they were dealing with some air quality issues. So they actually are all about paying attention to these things. And so now they not only have these new face mask, but they’re also sourcing some clear masks.

Dan Gingiss (20:05):
And you’re about to tell us what a clear mask is, right?

Joey Coleman (20:08):
I am Dan, and this is where this story gets particularly interesting and takes it to another level. So the clear mask has all the properties of irregular protective face mask, but instead of covering the mouth with cloth, it has a clear shield that allows people to see the wearer’s full face. So people who are deaf or hard of hearing can understand better because they can read the lips. Now clear mask is the first fully transparent, FDA cleared mask, that is optimized for maximum clarity and Apple work with Gallaudet University in Washington, DC to identify solution, and then tested the clear mask with employees in their stores.

Dan Gingiss (20:52):
I love it. And as our listeners may recall, uh, we talked about a partnership between Starbucks and Gallaudet University back in episode 42, and Gallaudet specializes in educating the deaf and hard of hearing students. And it’s yet another example of a brand reaching out to the amazing educators at Gallaudet to help find creative solutions that work for every customer.

Joey Coleman (21:18):
Yeah. And you know, what’s interesting, Dan, I found that when I’m wearing a mask out in public, one of the things that is somewhat disconcerting is normally if I’m walking through a store, I would smile at the other people I’m walking by, you know, you make eye contact with someone and you express a smile or something just to be friendly. Well, when you’re wearing a mask, you can’t see that unless it’s a clear mask. So there’s the benefit for everyone wearing a clear mask. But there’s also the benefit for folks who maybe are having difficulty hearing folks. And I know I’ve certainly been in a situation where someone who’s wearing a mask is speaking to me. And it’s harder to hear what they’re saying because of the mask, the clear mask kind of solves for that problem.

Dan Gingiss (22:02):
Absolutely. And it is, I think one of the things that we’ve all missed in the last few months is that, you know, used to be that you would see somebody wearing a mask. And that was a different thing in the United States. I mean, obviously in Asian cultures, it’s been very common for a long time, but here in the US it wasn’t. And now we see them all the time. And one of the things that we’ve missed is you, you can’t see most of someone’s face, right? You, you can only read their eyes. You can’t read their whole facial expression. And certainly if you are needing to read lips or something in order to hear better, you’re, you’re kind of lost. So I think it’s a very interesting solution and I’m glad you found it.

Joey Coleman (22:42):
Well, friends, it would be great to be on the other side of this pandemic, but we’re not. And if you talk to medical professionals and look at the research globally, and that means going beyond your favorite news channel and actually exploring the global response to COVID-19, you’ll find a common thread among countries that have eliminated or dramatically reduced the COVID threat – their citizens wear masks whenever they leave their homes and interact with others in public and in the same way. So many people look to the example of Apple to model, surprise and delight for their customer experiences. Dan and I recommend that our listeners look to Apple again and see them as leading the way when it comes to mask, then go find some great mask solutions for yourself, for your team and your customers so we can all work together to eliminate this pandemic threat and get back to some really great customer experiences.

[PARTNERSHIP WITH AVTEX][Playing Experience Points – What Happened]
Joey Coleman (23:40):
You know, one of the best things about our new game show experience points is that we got to have a lot of fun creating the games that we play our partners at Avtex, who are also sponsors of the experience. This show, let us have a lot of free reign. And we collaborated together to come up with some interesting ways to talk about customer experience. So one of the games we created is called What Happened, and here’s how the game works:

Rules Hostess (24:11):
In what happened. Watch the first half of an experience story choose what you think happens next from four possible endings. And for correctly, for 500 points, if incorrect, you’ll be granted an extra life and the opportunity to answer from the remaining three endings for 250 points.

Dan Gingiss (24:32):
So I absolutely love this game because like our listeners story segment earlier on in this episode on experience, this, this is an opportunity for us to hear from other people about stories that they have had that are either good or bad customer experiences. And so they record videos for us and we get to hear their story, but only the first half of the story. And then there’s this whole mystery about what happens next and you and I got to have the fun of writing the four potential answers to what happened next.

Joey Coleman (25:07):
Absolutely. And what I love about the, the user generated listener generated stories is folks just so you know, Dan, and it was really just Dan. I think I did it once. Dan did it twice tweeted out, Hey, or, and did on Facebook and all the socials, you know, Hey, tell us your stories and here’s the rules. Tell us the first half, and then do a second video where you tell the second half, and we got dozens of submissions. And I think what it really proved is that everyone is having customer experiences, that they want to talk about. Whether those are the good experiences, the bad experiences, the ugly experiences, or the exceptional experiences, they want to share their story. And so not only is this a fun way to incorporate listener generated stories into the game, but it’s really interesting to see how many of our celebrity contestants and, oh, we’ve got an amazing lineup of celebrity customer experience experts, what they think the answers are because there’s that interesting dance between, well, what the answer should be versus what do you think actually happened.

Dan Gingiss (26:11):
or what I hope it would be? And that’s the fun, right? We often get the person cause they’re a lot of them have been involved in customer experience. They’re saying, well, gosh, I really hope that they took great care of them. And it was a fantastic experience. But this answer over here sounds so much more typical. And of course we’ve inserted that answer on purpose because it sounds typical. And I know we sound a little, like, what’s the word that I’m looking for here where we’re trying to trick people, but it’s really just, we’re trying to have, we’re trying to make customer experience fun. And I think we’ve really succeeded with this show.

Joey Coleman (26:45):
So friends, if you want to find out What Happened and not just the game, what happened, but also what happens in general on experience points, go check out the show. You can find this on YouTube. You can find us as a podcast. You can go to experience points, game that’s ExperiencePointsGame.com and see our celebrity contestants. See videos, listen to the game, come check it out. If you like the experience, this show sponsored by our great partners at Avtex. I think you’re really going to love experience points the game from our friends today.

[SEGMENT INTRO – CX PRESS]
Joey Coleman (27:24):
There are so many great customer experience articles to read, but who has the time we summarize them and offer clear takeaways you can implement starting tomorrow. Enjoy this segment of CX Press, where we read the articles so you don’t need to!

[CX PRESS][TikTok + DoggFace + Ocean Spray + Fleetwood Mac = Viral Video]
Joey Coleman (27:42):
Alright Dan, what do skateboarding, Fleetwood, Mac and ocean spray have in common?

Dan Gingiss (27:48):
Okay. I have no clue at all.

Joey Coleman (27:55):
I was actually hoping you would have no clue. I felt like there was a 50/50 chance here. You’re either going to know exactly what I was talking about, or you were going to have no idea what I was talking about. And I got to tell ya, I’m thrilled that it’s no idea.

Dan Gingiss (28:08):
I mean, obviously I know what those three things are separately, but I have no idea what they have in common, our audience.

Joey Coleman (28:15):
So, so let me explain a little bit about this. If folks haven’t had the chance to see this yet. So this is an evolving story in experience marketing, vitality and empathy, which you can read more about in the inc com article by Justin Brisso titled ocean spray just gave the viral skateboarding, TikTok guy, an extraordinary gift. It’s a lesson in emotional intelligence. Now here’s what happened a few weeks ago. Nathan “Dogface” Apadaca was on his way to the potato warehouse where.

Dan Gingiss (28:51):
hold on a minute.

Joey Coleman (28:53):
This is so great. There is so many fabulous pizza that says an actual story, an actual, honest to goodness story. And let me tell you, by the time I am done with this story, it is so beautifully surreal and fabulous that you couldn’t replicate it. And that’s part of the reason why it’s so incredible.

Dan Gingiss (29:10):
I just want to remind you though, before you go on that so far, you have mentioned the viral skateboarding, Tik TOK guy, some dude named dog face. And he was of course on his way to a potato warehouse.

Joey Coleman (29:22):
I know it’s just like this story. You would think I’m making it up. But folks, to my knowledge, every piece of this story is true. All right. So a few weeks ago, Nathan face Apodaca was on his way to the potato warehouse where he works in Idaho when his 2000 Dodge Durango gave out on him now, because he didn’t want to be late for work. Nathan grabbed his skateboard – or longboard for all of you, aficionados listening – and as he skated down the highway, he decided to film a quick video of himself, sipping on a big bottle of ocean spray, cranberry juice and lip sinking to the Fleetwood Mac classic Dreams. Now what happened after this (as if that wasn’t incredible enough) what happened after this is the video which he uploaded to TikTok went viral and it racked up millions of views. In fact, as we’re recording this right now, over 60.8 million views, people started filming their own recreations of the video, including Fleetwood Mac and all of this led to a ton of free advertising for ocean spray, because remember he’s drinking the Ocean Spray, cranberry juice, but instead of just saying, thanks or taking advantage of all this free press, the folks at Ocean Spray decided to do something special. So first they partnered with a local Nissan dealership to give Nathan a new and get this folks cranberry red Nissan Frontier pickup truck. It’s so good. And then they filled the cargo bed with jugs of cranberry juice. And there’s the ocean sprays CEO, Tom Hayes noted quote. When we saw Nathan’s video and the joy it created, we knew we needed to celebrate him and the happiness he spurred. We were humbled to gift him something of importance to him, a truck we knew he needed.

Dan Gingiss (31:23):
You know, I love this so much because earlier on in this season, Episode 106, for those scoring at home, you talked about a, another TicTok video about an employee from Chick-fil-a and Chick-fil-a’s response was not quite as positive as Ocean Sprays. And I think what’s great about this is that ocean spray could have just put on their marketing hats and tried to capitalize on the surprise virality, like so many other brands have done, but instead they showcased how brands could and frankly should use emotional intelligence to connect with their customers. And so, as it turns out in an early interview with TMZ, Nathan shared that his Durango while having over 330,000 miles on it just, and I quote, shuts off sometimes

Joey Coleman (32:18):
As, as vehicles that have over 330,000 miles are want to do sometimes, right? And so when it came time to acknowledge all this great free publicity ocean spray did more than say, thank you. They actually showed their thanks.

Dan Gingiss (32:35):
And this, similar to the Chik-fil-a story led to even more publicity, Nathan made a second video driving his new truck while, what do you think he was drinking Joey?

Joey Coleman (32:46):
That would be Ocean Spray cranberry juice.

Dan Gingiss (32:48):
That would be Ocean Spray cranberry juice. And that new video has already racked up as of this recording, nearly 28 million views.

Joey Coleman (32:59):
It’s insane. And to fully bring this story full circle, Ocean Spray’s CEO created his own version of the video in an effort to quote, keep the vibe going.

Dan Gingiss (33:12):
And I love that because there is nothing better than a CEO acting human, right? It is so true. I mean, we see these frankly, mostly guys, you know, dressed up in their suits in front of the microphone, doing a quarterly earnings statement, very serious. Exactly. And it’s very rare that you just see them in blue jeans or shorts, you know, being a person with their family. And, and I love, I mean, there are not a lot of CEOs that would have been bold enough to go and shoot their own video. Very few I’d say of the fortune 500, I dunno, less than 10, you think would probably be willing to do it.

Joey Coleman (33:55):
I was going to guess five, but definitely less than 10 because you run the risk of, you know, well, that’s not what we’re supposed to look like. And here’s the point – friends we’re living in an era where the more real you are, the more attention that garners. You know, I think we are hopefully knock on wood, moving beyond the era of everything being hyper scripted and PR you know, quaffed and, you know, figured out in a way that everybody’s like, Oh, here’s the prepared scene and the scripted move. It’s like, no even reality TV. People are getting bored with reality TV because they’ve come to realize that reality TV shows are scripted. And that’s what made this video so fascinating and what it made it stand out. Because, I mean, this is the guy who works at the potato warehouse, right. And he’s just shooting this video.

Dan Gingiss (34:51):
I so want some videos of the potato warehouse, cause I’m imagining right now. And I, I, I mean, it’s just great.

Joey Coleman (34:57):
Yeah, it’s great. And the, the ripple effect, no pun intended on this was crazy because Fleetwood Mac released to the song Dreams 43 years ago. And this week where we’re, when we’re recording dreams was number three on the billboard charts. Like this is the song that was popular 43 years ago. And people have heard it plenty since then, but it’s like, it just skyrocketed the popularity and Fleetwood Mac is like, you know, and they’ve done some interviews with him where he’s just, Oh my gosh, like, this is an amazing experience. And we love it. And we love the energy behind it. And it wasn’t done for commercial purposes and it wasn’t a scheme and it wasn’t to try to bring something back. It was pure fun and music and joy and skateboarding down the highway to get to work LA jug and, you know, while drinking a jug of ocean spray. I mean, it’s just everything about this was what viral videos in my opinion should be about.

Dan Gingiss (36:06):
Yeah, absolutely. And I have to say having two kids, one of whom is quite active on TikTok. It is amazing that one of the results of TikTok becoming popular is that my kids know music from many, many generations. And I there’s been several times where my son or daughter will start singing along to a classic rock song. And I’m like, where do you know this? From the answers TikTok, because a lot, because all these videos are set to music and, and somehow some way a song like Fleetwood, Mac’s just shows up. And now everybody knows that song. And it’s it’s number three 43 years after it’s released. I think that’s a good thing. And it’s one of the positives that I think that platform has brought to society.

Speaker 2 (36:52):
Well, and that may be the one of the first times that a parent has ever sung the praises of Tik TOK. I love it, Dan. And it’s so true. I mean, our youngest son who is four the other day, I saw him walk by the Alexa and he said, Alexa, play, I Love Rock and Rroll by Joan Jett and the Blackhearts. Right? And it’s like, how does he know this song was decades before he was born? And it’s the exposure to the music. It creates connection. It’s a nostalgia for the parents. I love every bit about it. So what can we learn about this example, this story? Well, we can learn that Joey’s actually doing a decent job staying up on the TikTok kids to Joey stories from social media. Okay. But seriously, what can we learn about the confluence of Nathan’s TikTok video and Fleetwood Mac’s playful participation and Ocean Spray’s empathetic gifting? Well, what we can learn is that people are thirsting for human connection. We love a feel-good fun, loving story. And while it’s impossible to know whether or not something is going to go viral, when we film it, our reaction afterwards is much easier to design. So look for opportunities to reward and acknowledge your advocates. If someone’s going to sing your praises, whether that’s figuratively or literally look for ways to thank them, that move the dial for them in the same way that they move the dial for you. Somebody leaves you a positive review on Amazon. Go thank them. Shout them out. Somebody kind enough to comment about you on social, acknowledge that and throw the gift back to them. So in the now famous words of Nathan dog face Apodaca, we can all just keep the vibe going.

Dan Gingiss (38:30):
And me? I’m going to get some cranberry juice.

[SHOW OUTRO]
Joey Coleman (38:38):
Wow. Thanks for joining us for another episode of Experience This!

Dan Gingiss (38:42):
We know there are tons of podcasts to listen, to magazines and books to read, reality TV to watch. We don’t take for granted that you’ve decided to spend some quality time listening to the two of us.

Joey Coleman (38:52):
We hope you enjoyed our discussions. And if you do, we’d love to hear about it. Come on over to ExperienceThis Show.com and let us know what segments you enjoyed, what new segments you’d like to hear. This show is all about experience, and we want you to be part of the Experience This Show.

Dan Gingiss (39:10):
Thanks again for your time. And we’ll see you next week for more

Joey Coleman (39:13):
Experience

Dan Gingiss (39:15):
This!

Episode 109 – Enhancing the Experience with Efficiency and Effectiveness

Join us as we discuss using technology to know where to go, the move to telemedicine during the pandemic, and a framework for creating more content than you could possibly want.

Signage, Appointments, and Creators– Oh My!

[This Just Happened] Traffic Lights in the Bathroom?!

Things We Mentioned in This Segment:

• Chris Strub – friend of the Experience This! Show and all-around great guy
Dallas Fort Worth International Airport (DFW)

[Redesign the Experience] A Doctor’s Visit Without a Waiting Room

Things We Mentioned in This Segment:

The Rise of Telemedicine During the COVID-19 Pandemic – by Dan Gingiss 

[Partnership with Avtex] Introducing the Experience Points Game Show!

Things We Mentioned in This Segment:

• Avtex
• Experience Points

[What Are You Reading?] Create Limitless Amounts of Content

Things We Mentioned in This Segment:

The Content Fuel Framework: How to Generate Unlimited Story Ideas – by Melanie Deziel

Host Contact Information

Email Dan: Dan@dangingiss.com

Tweet Dan Gingiss: @DGingiss

Email Joey: JoeyC@JoeyColeman.com

DanGingiss.com

JoeyColeman.com

Subscribe to Experience This on Apple Podcasts

Episode Transcript

Download an unedited transcript of Episode 109 here or read it below:

[SHOW INTRO]
Dan Gingiss (00:05):
Welcome to Experience This!

Joey Coleman (00:08):
Where you’ll find inspiring examples of customer experience, great stories of customer service, and tips on how to make your customers love you even more!

Dan Gingiss (00:18):
Always upbeat and definitely entertaining, customer retention expert Joey Coleman…

Joey Coleman (00:23):
and social media expert, Dan Gingiss – serve as your hosts for a weekly dose of positive customer experience.

Dan Gingiss (00:31):
So hold on to your headphones… It’s time to Experience This!

[EPISODE 109 INTRO]
Dan Gingiss (00:35):
Get ready for another episode of the Experience This! Show!

Joey Coleman (00:46):
Join us as we discuss using technology to solve an age old problem of knowing where to go, the move to telemedicine during the pandemic, and a framework for creating more content than you could possibly want.

Dan Gingiss (01:03):
Signage, appointments, and creators… Oh my!

[SEGMENT INTRO – THIS JUST HAPPENED]
Joey Coleman (01:09):
We love telling stories and sharing key insights you can implement – or avoid – based on our experiences. Can you believe that This Just Happened?!

[THIS JUST HAPPENED][Traffic Lights in the Bathroom?!]
Dan Gingiss (01:23):
So a good friend of mine, and friend of the Experience This! Show – Chris Strub – was actually traveling recently, he’s one of my few friends to be traveling, he has been going around to a few places to do his Giving Days that he hosts to raise money for charity. And he was walking through the Dallas Fort Worth airport. And I was pleased that he thought of me, maybe us, if you will, possibly…

Joey Coleman (01:49):
Well, let’s be honest, it was you – Strub! I’m taking this personally. I know Strub too, but no, no, no – I’m going to save my remarks… Go ahead, Dan!

Dan Gingiss (01:57):
Anyway, he thought of me and decided to tweet at me and said, “Never in the history of Twitter has a tweet been more likely to appear in a future @dgingiss CX keynote, then this bit of scatalogical brilliance” and he had a laugh out loud emoji. He then included three pictures, which I want to describe to our audience because I think he might be right now.

Joey Coleman (02:26):
Now before we describe them to the audience, Strub, I’m gonna forgive you for not including me in this tweet – he knows us well enough to know that I’m not on the Twitters. So, but thanks for getting it towards us. Yes, it probably will show up in a Dan Gingiss CX keynote but guess what, buddy, it’s showing up on the Experience This! Show as well!.

Dan Gingiss (02:45):
Exactly. So when you pass by the restrooms at Dallas Fort Worth Airport, you’re greeted with a, what looks like a pretty big, maybe 32″ television screen turned on its side, so it’s vertical.

Joey Coleman (03:02):
It’s a giant iPad!

Dan Gingiss (03:04):
Well, huge! Anyway, there’s one for men and one for women – as indicated by the internationally well-known man and woman signs. And it notes how many stalls are available in the bathroom, and how long it will take to walk to the next bathroom. And in the examples that he showed us, it just so happens, that there were four stalls available in the men’s room and two in the women’s room – which sounds about right, because you know, it’s always a, a longer wait for the women’s room, but then when you walk in, there are lights that are above each one of the stalls that are either green or red – to tell you which ones are occupied and which ones aren’t. And it kind of reminds me, I’ve seen those at parking garages before, but I’ve never seen one in a bathroom. And I thought it was pretty cool. So I appreciated him sharing it. What did you think Mr. Coleman?

Joey Coleman (04:02):
You know, it wouldn’t be a “Dan Gingiss episode” of Experience This if we didn’t have some mention of course, across the season, of a bathroom experience. So thank you, Chris Strub for pointing Dan in the direction so we could have the Season Six bathroom experience story!

Dan Gingiss (04:21):
Wait a minute, are you saying this just because I have not one, not two, but potentially three different bathroom stories that I tell in my keynotes?

Joey Coleman (04:29):
You know, let’s just say it’s clear that the bathroom experience is part of the experience and you stumble across a lot of remarkable ones. I actually found this one to be fairly remarkable for a couple reasons. Number one – when you are using the bathroom, the idea of someone knocking on the door is not super exciting. When you are using a bathroom in an airport, there are people that are trying to quickly use the bathroom and move on to their flight, so speed is probably at a more, a higher premium, in a bathroom setting in an airport then maybe in any other type of bathroom. And so the fact that they have almost a traffic light system of like, “Hey, you’re good to go on this one, not to go on that one,” I actually thought was pretty creative and it kind of speaks to something we talk a lot about on the show, which is – thinking about how you can deliver convenience to your customers. Now, in this case, the customer is the person needing to use the restroom. And obviously the organization is the Dallas Airport and they’ve made a technology investment to help move things along. What I also loved – the green and red lights, that was great – but I also loved the arrow pointing you in the direction of the next closest bathroom and telling you how long it would take you to walk there. Because especially if you’ve not been to an airport before, one of the things you’re often wondering like, well, if I don’t use this one, how far do I have to go? Is it before my gate? Or is it after my next gate? And am I going to have to walk past it? Et cetera. There’s a lot of stuff that’s going on and I think in a world where travel, as a general premise for many people, is a stressful experience, anything you can do to increase the convenience and the ease for your customers – while they’re already in a heightened, stressful state – is going to be a good thing.

Dan Gingiss (06:21):
Yeah. What I thought was interesting here was this seemed to be a combination of things that we’ve seen in other places. So I mentioned that I had seen it, and I’m sure you have too, in parking garages – which is a nice touch to tell you, “Hey, this parking garage is full” or “it has only three more spaces left.” And then there’s the lights over the different parking stalls to tell you which are available and which aren’t we also talked about. And you’re going to be very disappointed with Rain Man because I can’t find the episode in my brain, but we did an episode.

Joey Coleman (06:53):
Hang on ladies and gentlemen, I have to pick myself back up, I just fell over. Dan Gingiss is about to reference a past episode of Experience This! and he doesn’t know the call sign number. Hopefully some of you remember the episode number and can write in and let us know what it was.

Dan Gingiss (07:07):
Yes. Well, it was the episode where we talked about, I believe it was an entire episode about our experiences in London, I think? Or did we do one about, there was one where we did an international episode and in all of the experiences were about traveling… You had a massage and a haircut…

Joey Coleman (07:26):
It was in London, in the Heathrow Airport, yes!

Dan Gingiss (07:27):
So in that same episode, we also talked about how there were signs for security that told you how long each of the lines had to wait. So if you went to the South Security, it was a 15 minute wait, but the North Security only had 10 minute wait or something like that, and we thought that was really cool. So we’ve seen the kind of “how long you have to wait” thing in other places as well and then also, when you walk through an airport, you often see the signs that say “Next Eating Area – three minutes walk,” or it’ll show you all of the restaurants and how long it takes to walk there, and so I liked – as you pointed out – the little arrow that kinda said, “well, you can, uh, you know, you can wait for two more minutes and walk to the next one. Even better might’ve been to say that the next one had more stalls available, right? Because if you took the walk and then, and then it was busier, it might be frustrating…

Joey Coleman (08:24):
So true. So true, huge opportunity for the upgrade in the experience there, which I think brings up an interesting point Dan. The best experiences around, in many ways, are pirated from other industries and brought in your industry. And it’s one of the reasons why we decided when we created the Experience This! Show to talk about every possible industry under the sun, because our hope is that our listeners can hear one story and say, “that’s not my industry, but I could do something similar in my industry and it would stand out, it would be remarkable, it would be different!” And I agree with you giving someone a preview of what they might find when they make that walk, would be a great way to make it even more beneficial to the person looking at the sign.

Dan Gingiss (09:09):
So I think that’s a great segue to the takeaway here, which is, look, you may not even have bathrooms because you may be a completely digital business. So it’s not about the bathrooms. It’s about giving customers the information that they need to make the decisions that they need to make. And in this particular case, it has to do with, am I going to go to the bathroom now? Or am I going to walk further to another one? But the indicators, the signage, and the indicators, and the technology that’s used to track that, can be used in lots of other different places. And I urge you to think in your business of where your customers may be waiting, or may have to make a decision, that you can help them by just providing them with a little bit more information.

[SEGMENT INTRO – REDESIGN THE EXPERIENCE]
Joey Coleman (09:53):
With a pandemic sweeping the globe and shifting the way organizations interact with their customers, many of the old ways of operating just don’t work anymore. As we all navigate a COVID-19 world, it’s time to Redesign the Experience.

[REDESIGN THE EXPERIENCE][A Doctor’s Visit Without a Waiting Room]
Dan Gingiss (10:12):
Amid a global pandemic and stay at home orders in almost every state, most businesses have had to pivot to a virtual existence. Now in a healthcare industry, this means a much higher dependence on telemedicine, which is also called tele- health in some spaces. And that has both doctors and patients adapting. Doctors, therapists, dentists, even veterinarians, have shifted appointments to virtual settings as a means to triage health issues and provide non-emergency care to patients. Now I wrote about this in a blog for our friends and sponsors of the Experience This! Show – Avtex – and thought that we should also talk about it here on the Experience This! Show, because I found it to be a really interesting dynamic that has evolved out of the pandemic, that I think has a lot of impact both within the healthcare industry, of course, but also to businesses outside it.

Joey Coleman (11:12):
Well, and at the risk of, you know, putting the cart before the horse – or what’s the opposite of burying the lead? the reveal? – this may be something that is good, that has come from the pandemic. I mean, I don’t want to give away kind of where we’re taking the conversation, but I generally think this shift is a positive one.

Dan Gingiss (11:31):
Well, yeah. And we’ve talked about that several times this season that some of the changes that we’ve seen during COVID are (a) going to become permanent and (b) are positive improvements. And so if there is a silver lining to what has been a pretty lousy experience overall for everybody over the last six/seven months is that there are some positive experiences – customer experience or in this case, patient experience – coming out of it. So as I started investigating this, I did an informal survey of my friends and connections on Facebook. And I just asked people, “Have you used telemedicine? And if so, where?” And I was amazed at the results! People came back and said that they had virtual appointments with allergists, behavioral therapists, dermatologists, ears, nose, and throat doctors, mental health professionals, occupational therapists, ophthalmologists, orthopedists, physical therapists, neurosurgeons, and of course, their primary care provider.

Joey Coleman (12:27):
Well, I don’t know if this means that you have a lot of friends on Facebook, Dan, or if your friends have got some serious health issues! Are they just sickly folks?! No, I think, I think it’s probably the former (obviously I’m being facetious) but I think what’s fascinating here is we’ve got a lot of different types of medicine that I would posit prior to March or April of this year, people hadn’t considered that telehealth or the telemedicine solution, or if they had wanted that their provider didn’t offer it. I

mean, I shared earlier in the season – and I’ll steal one from you, Dan, I think it was Episode 103 – my wife’s experience with the eye doctor and being able to snap a photo of her eye and text it to the eye doctor and say, “Hey, what is this? What’s going on?” And the doctor being able to say, “Hey, guess what? It’s okay, it’s fine. It’s, you know, it’ll resolve itself in a week or so. And if it doesn’t let me know and you can come in and see me.” But just that ability to immediately get an expert assessment of the situation – without needing to get in the car and drive there, without needing to make an appointment, without needing to run the risk of exposing ourselves or the providers to COVID. I mean, the convenience alone is incredibly valuable…

Dan Gingiss (13:44):
It’s something you’d be willing to pay for in the future…

Joey Coleman (13:47):
100%! Let me tell you, I actually texted the provider afterwards and I said, “Send me a bill. Seriously!” And he was like, “No, Joey, it’s all good. We’ve been your eye doctor for years. Don’t sweat it. We’ll see you next time we see you for your regular annual checkup,” but it was so convenient that I found myself compelled as a patient or as a customer to say, “just bill me,” because I really appreciated the speedy response time.

Dan Gingiss (14:13):
Well, and you’re right, that a lot of these types of doctors have had to move here very quickly. I talked to someone who worked for a large, multi-state dermatology practice, and he told me that just in his organization, they saw telemedicine appointments jump from 10 to 20 per month before the pandemic, to more than 500 per day after the pandemic started.

Joey Coleman (14:41):
That, that’s like, that’s not even hockey stick growth… That’s rocket ship growth!

Dan Gingiss (14:44):
That is rocket ship growth.

Joey Coleman (14:47):
The crazy thing is, when that happens, it really pushes the bounds of the tech team who’s helping provide that. You know, I actually was talking to somebody who oversees technology for a major hospital provider and they had kind of a similar assessment and the way he described it, is he said, “Joey – we took our next six years of plans for rolling out telehealth and telemedicine and we implemented them in under 90 days.” And what this meant is his team was just slammed, and working, and to be candid – and I won’t mention any names – he said the hardest part was getting the doctors on board. The patients were ready, the patients were excited and like, didn’t need a lot of explanation. It was convincing the doctors that the image they had of themselves as being the kind of person who has people in, who have people in the waiting room, waiting them to see them could be sacrificed for speed, efficiency, safety, ease of use, a seamless experience, et cetera. Like all the benefits, but maybe a little bit of the less of the status or, you know, or at least that’s the way it was perceived in, uh, in his medical community he was working with.

Dan Gingiss (16:03):
It’s an interesting perspective that I hadn’t really thought of… But the folks that I talked to – and I talked to doctors, dentists, and even a veterinarian, two veterinarians actually – and they all reported positive patient experiences, which obviously is why we’re talking about it. But most importantly, they also reported successful clinical outcomes. So what that means is patients are getting their problems solved, like your wife did with her eye via telemedicine, it’s convenient, it’s fast, and it is been a really good experience – both from the clinical side and from the patient experience side. So I think it’s fascinating. And I mean, I was talking to my friend, who’s a veterinarian and I’m like, “How does this even work? Your patient can’t talk!”

Joey Coleman (16:54):
Right? It’s like, you know, “Buffy, what’s wrong with you? Bark girl! Bark!” You know, I mean, it’s, it’s, it’s a challenging concept, but let’s be honest, I think it’s the reality. I mean, I’ve got to ask you, Dan, what, what do you think? I mean, do you think this is a trend that is going to move from being a trend to being the reality that it’s here to stay? Or is this just kind of a COVID-era novelty or anomaly?

Dan Gingiss (17:19):
Well, I think this is a great question and I actually did ask, uh, both a doctor, friend and a vet friend. And before I tell you what they say, I thought it’d be fun, joy if you, and I just kind of volley back and forth a little bit on some of the advantages of telehealth or telemedicine of which I think there are many. And also, let’s just be honest with our audience. There are some disadvantages too, and maybe those are things that end up getting fixed. Maybe they’re not, but we’re still kind of early days here. So, you know, when to, off on the advantages, we talked about convenience. So I think that is really an obvious one. There’s also this issue of accessibility, which I thought was really interesting. And that might be for patients that want to visit a doctor in another state that they maybe wouldn’t have had access to before. Maybe there’s a specialist or something like that. And I thought that was kind of interesting that I, that I hadn’t thought about. And relatedly is there are different communities in particular, I would say the elderly community, which sometimes has difficulty obtaining transportation to a doctor’s appointment. And now that becomes completely unnecessary. And so that becomes more accessible for them as well.

Joey Coleman (18:32):
Oh, Dan, I totally agree with you and I’ll take it one step further. You know, what about those who are, you know, not in a position to have their own vehicle, right? So that they’re, they’re run into transportation concerns and they’re used to taking the bus and they may have to take a bus for four hours to get from one side of town, to the other, jumping from bus to bus, to bus, to get to a medical provider. It’s easier just not to go. And what’s fascinating is when we think of telemedicine, you know what originally came out of the idea of doing these things over the phone? Well, the reality is more Americans and more people globally are walking around with their phone in their pocket or in their purse today than at any other time in human history. And the reach, if you will, of a cell phones into lower economic communities is much higher than one might otherwise expect. So there is a huge access piece of this that comes along. This isn’t only good for the patients though. This is good for the doctors. I mean, there’s a much higher efficiency and seamlessness that they can move through the potential revenue for a doctor increases dramatically. Because if you think about just even if you’re a non doctor and you think how now in the COVID era, you jump from Zoom call to Zoom to Zoom call, and you might crank out four calls where if you were getting in the car and going around and doing sales appointments or marketing calls or whatever it may be or visits, you know, it would take you a day. You can do four before lunch. And I think doctors, it’s the same thing. They can be much more efficient and increase the number of patients that they interact with in a given time period.

Dan Gingiss (20:03):
You know, I love that you said that Joey, because, uh, one of the things that I talked about in my book was about how Uber solved the problem for both passengers and for drivers. And that’s why it was so successful in, in disrupting. And I think you’re absolutely right here and I’ll go one step further that besides from helping patients and helping doctors get also helps the system because it reduces unnecessary visits for non-emergencies, right? You have people that go to the doctor or go or worse, go to the emergency room for things that they don’t really need to. And that then by reducing those, that frees up those resources for the people who really need them who are really experiencing an emergency. So whenever you have a situation where basically it’s a win, win, win, that is generally the kind of disruption that is going to last. And that I think generally we now welcome.

Joey Coleman (20:58):
Absolutely. And I mean, let’s be honest that the ER piece of this is huge. If you look at the amount of emergency room visits that are for things that are not emergencies, and that’s either because they’re dealing with a patient who’s uninsured or under insured, or doesn’t have a primary care physician, or doesn’t feel that they can make their schedule work to get an appointment three weeks from now. So they just go into the ER, whenever it’s available. I mean, this led to the proliferation of urgent care centers. But I think when we think about telemedicine and telehealth, that takes it to an entirely different level. It’s like, you know, the age old, a TV ad. If you have a phone, you have a lawyer. It’s like, if you have a phone, you have a doctor. And I think that’s actually better for our society than if you have a phone, you have a lawyer.

Dan Gingiss (21:46):
Sure, exactly. So quickly let’s cover a couple of the disadvantages because there definitely are some. You pointed out one, I think earlier, which is that there is a cost to doctors or hospitals for purchasing new equipment, integrating technology into existing systems, making ensuring privacy and security training doctors and staff. So, you know, while a lot of organizations have been able to stand this up really, really quickly, it is not without expense, both dollars and time resources.

Joey Coleman (22:21):
Well, and this is a, you know, just as a little aside, you know, one of the challenges that exist in a lot of hospitals today is the confluence between HIPAA (the major regulation here in the United States around healthcare privacy) and technology. And interestingly enough, one of the ways that shows up is if you have a computer screen in the office where there are going to be patients or other people, it is set to log out or to force you to type in your name and password on a much faster rate than the typical computer you use in an office setting. So there there’s, you know, kind of, for lack of a better way of putting it behavioral challenges that have to be adopted as well. And, you know, I mentioned the lawyers in the last comment and I say this as a recovering lawyer, we’re going to need a dramatic rewrite of most of the laws as it relates to healthcare and privacy if we are going to make the move to telemedicine that I think most patients want to move to. And I think most doctors probably as well, another challenge, I think that ties into this, that I alluded to earlier with, you know, the veterinarian scenario is not being able to examine patients physically. I don’t know about you Dan, but there’s plenty of times where I go into the doctor where it’s not enough to say, Hey doc, what does this look like to you? Right. They’re poking it. They’re prodding it. They’re doing there. You know, there there’s more physical interaction than would be available over a screen call.

Dan Gingiss (23:53):
Oh, absolutely. For sure. And, and there, I mean, just like any experience, nothing replaces being there in person, and there are definitely going to be health issues in which you have to do that. It’s interesting that you mentioned HIPAA. I am one of the few people in the world that has actually read that entire privacy policy.

Joey Coleman (24:12):
I’m sorry, Dan, we got to get you a better life.

Dan Gingiss (24:15):
I know it’s tough, but it’s just a fun fact about it. It also doesn’t even mention social media and has not been updated since the advent of social media. So when you talk about technology, I mean, social media now is, I don’t know how many years old, but let’s call it North of 10 and there are no rules around this. And so as we continue to build on the technology and now we’ve got tele medicine, at some point, this stuff is going to have to be updated,

Joey Coleman (24:42):
Not to mention the number of people who happily violate their own privacy. As it relates to health care all day, every day. If I had a dollar for every time, I saw somebody on Facebook post a photo of some rash or bruise and say, Hey, does anybody have a guess what this is? And I’m just like, you’re going to crowd source via Facebook, an assessment of a medical issue. And invariably, you know, there’ll be some picture of somebody and it just looks terrible and nasty and oozing puss and it’s bad. And people are chiming in like, go see a doctor, stop asking your ex boyfriend from high school, for his opinion about what this is, unless that person happens to be a medical professional, don’t do it. So, yeah, there’s definitely a lot of downsides, but I think the interesting thing is we could have made this an Agree to Disagree episode, but I be willing to bet that the problem was we would have both ended up in the same camp, which is we agree that telehealth is a good thing. We agree that it is a silver lining from the COVID pandemic experience. And we think it’s here to stay.

Dan Gingiss (25:47):
I totally agree. And back to the doctor and the vet that I talked to, so the doctor said, and I’m quoting, “I think telemedicine will stay with us in one form or another after the pandemic. So it makes sense to figure out how to integrate it, to improve patient care and access.” And then the veterinarian who, by the way said that one of the downfalls was, was patient’s expecting that he always be available. And he referred to that. I thought this was brilliant as “being on a leash”,

Joey Coleman (26:18):
Ladies and gentlemen, he’s here all week!

Dan Gingiss (26:19):
Yeah, it was awesome. Anyway, he said, and I quote, “This is not going away. Just like most advances in technology and our civilization. It’s only going to become more and more incorporated into our life because of technology because of convenience and because of cost. These are things that the general public wants.”

Joey Coleman (26:37):
Well, ladies and gentlemen, boys, and girls there, you have it, Dan and I, we choose to agree to agree and advise all of our listeners to consider what parts of your pandemic experience will continue when the crisis is behind us. What have you done in your business to adapt to this world where we want to do more things online versus offline, and how are you making the investments that are going to continue those type of offerings going forward? Maybe the silver lining in all of this is that as we’ve all been pushed online, some experiences like going to the Dr. May have actually gotten better and may have actually improved for good and for good. I mean, not only for our personal good, but for the longterm as well.

[PARTNERSHIP WITH AVTEX][Introducing The Experience Points Game Show]
Dan Gingiss (27:32):
Hey, everyone for this entire season, you’ve been hearing Joey and I talk about this great new project that we’re working on with our friends at Avtex. It is called the Experience Points Game Show, and it is now available for you to watch or listen to… now! We are so excited. Please go to ExperiencePointsGame.com for more information. And here is an exclusive preview:

Multiple Voices (27:54):
I’m going to say what a moment of magic. My mom is an English teacher. I’ve written six books. I’m like, no, can’t do it because we will celebrate it over and over again on the way we need them to feel. If I take care of my team, they’ll take care of the customer. B2B companies report is the number one challenge, the customer experience. That was so hard. That’s the difference. The analogy worked. The speech did not a lot of tacos. Show me the money. Let’s win some money. This is so cool. And I’m learning so much. I think that’s powerful to say our customers are expecting more than ever before. I am still ready. There’s no way. There’s no way I’m going to guess. 44% hundred dollars per Dan Gingiss.

[SEGMENT INTRO – WHAT ARE YOU READING?]
Joey Coleman (28:49):
We spend hours and hours, nose deep in books. We believe that everything you read influence, it says the experiences you create. We’re happy to answer our favorite question. What are you reading?

[WHAT ARE YOU READING][The Content Fuel Framework by Melanie Deziel]
Dan Gingiss (29:02):
Many of us, whether we are solopreneurs or employees at companies have become content creators. I personally have been doing it for quite a long time. Starting with writing more than 250 articles for my college newspaper, the daily, Pennsylvania, and today, just between the two of us, Joey, we have this podcast and a video series that we’re doing for our

friends at Aztecs. I have a weekly live video series that you are a guest on. We both blog. We deliver keynotes. We’ve written books. It’s a lot of content.

Joey Coleman (29:39):
It’s a lot of content. And I don’t know that I’ve ever thought of all the different ways we’re creating content, but you’re absolutely right. I mean, it seems like every day I’m busy designing new slides, or writing something new for others to consume, or shooting a little video, or even something as simple as an email or a status update or a text message or a tweet – okay, just kidding. I’m not tweeting, but you are Dan. You’re tweeting enough for both of us. And you know, let’s be honest, we’re here on episode 109 of the Experience This Show. And we’re still creating new content every single week.

Dan Gingiss (30:14):
Yeah, no kidding. I’m still stunned about that. And I do think I speak for both of us when I say that we actually believe the show has gotten better as it’s gone along.

Joey Coleman (30:23):
At least that’s the hope right listeners? That is the hope. Is that like a fine wine we’re improving with age?

Dan Gingiss (30:29):
Exactly. So we also both know that content can be in the form of marketing frequently asked questions, blogs, product information, or really anything else. It’s always an important part of the experience. And often prospects will consume many, many pages of a website, for example, before deciding to do business with a new company. So that’s why I was interested in my friend, Melanie Deziel’s new book, The Content Fuel Framework: How to Generate Unlimited Story Ideas.

Joey Coleman (31:01):
Wait a minute. Did you say unlimited Dan?

Dan Gingiss (31:04):
I did Joey. And what I love about this book is that the framework is so darn simple. Here’s Melanie to tell us a little bit more about it.

Melanie Deziel (31:14):
I’m Melanie diesel, the chief content officer of story fuel and author of the content fuel framework, how to generate unlimited story ideas. The content field framework is a book for creators and marketers of any kind who have found themselves southernly needing to come up with tons of content ideas when maybe they didn’t have the training to do that. I use my background as a journalist to share my framework for how you can come up with an unlimited number of story ideas. The framework is simple and easy to use, and it’s made up of just two things. The focus, what is your content about and the format? How do you bring that content to life? The book is packed with tons of examples. It gives 10 different focuses you should consider and 10 different formats to start you off. In each chapter of this. Easy to read book has tons of examples showing you how this would come to life for businesses and solopreneurs of all types. My goal with the book is that if you read it – and I promise it’s a quick and easy read – you will find that you have a deep well of creativity inside of you. That you can activate whenever you need. Whenever you need something to post on your blog, to share on your social media platforms, a new video, you need to create a campaign you need to plan for a client… It doesn’t matter what you’re creating content for or why it only matters that you understand you have the tools you need to come up with content ideas. Whenever you need to. The book is, as I promise, an easy read and it’s packed with useful information prompts and all kinds of helpful resources and tips to help you get started. I really believe that if you read this book, you can go ahead and create hundreds. If not thousands of content ideas at the drop of a hat whenever you need to. So if that’s something that would benefit you and your business, please check out The Content Fuel Framework: How to Generate Unlimited Story Ideas by Melanie Deziel.

Dan Gingiss (33:08):
So, as Melanie mentioned, the framework has 10 focuses, which are people, basics, details, history, process, curation, data, product, examples, and opinions, and also 10 formats, which are writing infographics, audio, video, live video image, galleries, timelines, quizzes, tools, and maps. And her book walks through all of the focuses and all of the formats and shows real examples of content in action for each.

Joey Coleman (33:40):
That’s a whole lot of content options and a whole lot of categories and what I really liked was audio format. Since after all we’re recording a podcast right now, Melanie says that one of the advantages of audio content is that it can be consumed while the audience is using their eyes and hands for other activities. When content is audio only, this means that you, as the creator or storyteller can tap into time when your audience would otherwise not be consuming content while they’re working out at the gym, while they’re walking the dog, getting ready for work, washing dishes, which by the way, that’s my favorite one folks) or on their daily commute.

Dan Gingiss (34:19):
I’m wondering how many listeners ears perked up right now? Because you just said what it was that they were doing.

Joey Coleman (34:27):
Literally, we probably just described what you were doing. You know, we didn’t say sitting in a chair, just listening to the melodic tones of our voices talking about customer experiences. No, you’re probably doing something else. You’re multitasking, but this is kind of the good multitasking in that you can learn while your body’s doing, more rote activities.

Dan Gingiss (34:47):
Exactly. I also liked that Melanie used some of the less obvious formats and talked about timelines and quizzes and maps and that sort of thing. And that got me thinking differently because usually when I start to write a blog or a podcast segment, I just do it when an idea pops into my head or when I have a real life experience, I haven’t ever really thought of it this strategically before by combining that focus and that format. So check out Melanie Deziel’s book, The Content Fuel Framework: How to Generate Unlimited Story Ideas and never struggle to create content for your prospects and customers again.

[SHOW OUTRO]
Joey Coleman (35:33):
Wow. Thanks for joining us for another episode of Experience This!

Dan Gingiss (35:37):
We know there are tons of podcasts to listen to, magazines and books to read, reality TV, to watch! We don’t take for granted that you’ve decided to spend some quality time listening to the two of us.

Joey Coleman (35:47):
We hope you enjoyed our discussions. And if you do, we’d love to hear about it. Come on over to ExperienceThisShow.com and let us know what segments you enjoyed, what new segments you’d like to hear. This show is all about experience, and we want you to be part of the Experience This! Show.

Dan Gingiss (36:04):
Thanks again for your time, and we’ll see you next week for more

Joey Coleman (36:08):
Experience

Dan Gingiss (36:08):
This!

Episode 105 – Redesign Your Experiences to Acknowledge the “New Normal”

Join us as we discuss working from home – from a coffee shop, creative evolution to the classroom experience, and how “not juice” became a hit for a juice company

[Redesigning the Experience] Virtual Backgrounds, Live “From” Starbucks

Things We Mentioned in This Segment:

Starbucks
Virtual backgrounds from Starbucks
Zoom
Charles Schwab
Experience This Show – Episode #94

[Redesigning the Experience] Creative Classroom Creations in the COVID-era

Things We Mentioned in This Segment:

Two Florida teachers turned their students’ desks into little Jeeps to make social distancing less scary
St. Barnabas Episcopal School
Jeep
• Steve Weaver

[Partnership with Avtex] Announcing Experience Points!

Things We Mentioned in This Segment:

Avtex
• Experience Points
• Rohit Bhargava
• Jay Baer
Neen James
• Marquesa Pettway
Jesse Cole

[Redesigning the Experience] Repacking a Children’s Classic Drink to Help Kids Stay Safe

Things We Mentioned in This Segment:

• Capri Sun
• Water for Schools promo video

Host Contact Information

Email Dan: Dan@dangingiss.com

Tweet Dan Gingiss: @DGingiss

Email Joey: JoeyC@JoeyColeman.com

DanGingiss.com

JoeyColeman.com

Subscribe to Experience This on Apple Podcasts

Episode Transcript

Download a transcript of Episode 105 here or read it below:

[SHOW INTRO]

Dan Gingiss [00:00:05] Welcome to Experience This! 

Joey Coleman [00:00:08] Where you’ll find inspiring examples of customer experience, great stories of customer service, and tips on how to make your customers love you even more! 

Dan Gingiss [00:00:18] Always upbeat and definitely entertaining, customer retention expert Joey Coleman… 

Joey Coleman [00:00:23] …and social media expert Dan Gingiss serve as your hosts for a weekly dose of positive customer experience. 

Dan Gingiss [00:00:31] So hold on to your headphones, it’s time to Experience This!

[EPISODE 105 INTRO]
Dan Gingiss (00:40):
Get ready for another episode of the Experience This Show!

Joey Coleman (00:45):
Join us as we discuss how to work from home – from a coffee shop, creative evolution to the classroom experience, and how “not juice” became a hit for a juice company.

Dan Gingiss (00:59):
Caffeinating, protecting, and hydrating, Oh my!

[SEGMENT INTRO – REDESIGNING THE EXPERIENCE]

Joey Coleman (01:07):
With a pandemic sweeping the globe and shifting the way organizations interact with their customers, many of the old ways of operating just don’t work anymore. As we all navigate a COVID-19 world, it’s time to Redesign the Experience.

[REDESIGNING THE EXPERIENCE] Virtual Backgrounds, Live “From” Starbucks

Joey Coleman (01:26):
Friends… it has been a crazy few months to say the least. And as Dan and I thought about this season and how we might address the elephant in the room that is COVID-19 and the impact it has had on customer and employee experiences around the world, we realized that it made sense to create a special segment of our show that’s all about Redesigning the Experience in light of COVID-19.

Dan Gingiss (01:54):
And the idea here is that COVID-19, while a horrible pandemic and one that affected people in lots of terrible ways, has actually also evoked some customer experience changes that we think are going to be around for a long time after the pandemic is done. And a lot of those changes are actually good. And so, since we love talking about positive experiences, we felt like we needed to frame it in such a way to say, “Hey! This is a story that we’re telling you because it’s new since the pandemic and because of the pandemic.” And in fact, we decided that this episode, because we introduced this new segment (we’re so excited to bring it to you), we’re actually going to do three segments that are all Redesigning the Experience. We hope you enjoy it and as always, let us know if you have any comments or feedback.

Dan Gingiss (02:49):
With so much confusion about restaurants and retailers closing, and then reopening, and then maybe re-closing, it’s difficult for these industries to stay top of mind with customers. And companies across industries have been challenged with how to talk about COVID-19 without pandering, or repeating what’s already been said a hundred times.

Joey Coleman (03:14):
Oh, you mean like telling us about your “enhanced cleaning procedures?”

Dan Gingiss (03:19):
Exactly. You know, they were all enhanced. They weren’t better, or improved…

Joey Coleman (03:22):
All of them – just enhanced! Lots of enhanced cleaning… everywhere!

Dan Gingiss (03:27):
Yeah. So the coffee and dare I say marketing pioneers at Starbucks recently sent an email to customers offering a unique resource that is perfectly applicable to today’s stay at home world: downloadable, virtual backgrounds, featuring real Starbucks stores. So in other words, you can attend your next Zoom meeting looking like you’re sitting at a Starbucks!

Joey Coleman (03:55):
Hehehe! I love this, because it won’t at all feel like Starbucks in your house, but it can at least look like Starbucks.

Dan Gingiss (04:01):
Exactly. So the email said, “no matter where you are, you can feel like you’re at your favorite Starbucks, anytime, With a new collection of virtual backgrounds for your next video meeting.” Now, the collection features these beautiful views from Starbucks stores around the world, giving the person the sense that they’re sitting right there and obviously giving the viewers, you know, on the other side of the call, the sense that the person is sitting right there. I mean, one of my favorites was a store in Japan that has a ceiling design that is made from more than 2000 wooden sticks. And these sticks are just coming down almost like daggers out of the ceiling. It’s really interesting looking. There’s one that’s an outside view that is gorgeous in the, in Seattle, which as we know is Starbucks’ hometown. There are even video backgrounds of Starbucks’ cold brew and nitro beverages that are actually moving in the cup.

Joey Coleman (04:56):
I don’t even like coffee and I want a “nitro” just because of the name. It’s so exciting. You know what I love about this idea, Dan is so many people have settled into this idea of working from home and using Zoom or some other video conferencing service every day. And they want to show a little more personalization by customizing a virtual background, or they want to hide the fact that they haven’t folded the laundry by customizing a virtual background, or they make it want to make it seem like they’re in a nicer place than they actually live by customizing the virtual background. The moral of the story is, the folks at Starbucks saw this as an opportunity to participate in a different, yet familiar way in their customers’ lives. They’re able to create these free downloadable backgrounds that create some connection to the customer because it kind of feels like a Starbucks, but it’s not like this overly branded, “You are sponsored by Starbucks now!”

Dan Gingiss (05:50):
Yeah, I totally agree. I think as a marketer, this campaign is brilliant in its simplicity. I mean, it perfectly fits the Starbucks brand and it’s fun without being intrusive or salesy, as you say, and it taps into people’s emotions. I mean, that people are feeling right now. We all want to return back to normal. We want to be sitting at the Starbucks again, even if we don’t like coffee. And it also, wasn’t likely very costly because after all Starbucks already owned these images, right? So this was not a particularly expensive campaign as far as I can tell. So what can your company do to connect with customers during this unique time? We actually have three ideas. Joey, you want to start us off?

Joey Coleman (06:38):
Sure Dan! I think the first thing is to find something that resonates with your customers at an emotional level. I mean, let’s be honest, it’s never been easier to show empathy to customers because we know exactly what they’re going through. We’re all going through the same thing here, and yet it’s surprising how few brands are putting empathy first. How few brands are acknowledging that their customers, like them, are stuck at home. They’re missing their family and friends. They’re fearful of contracting COVID-19 or infecting others. We should all be able to relate to that. And so I think being able to harness into some type of an emotional connection with your customers is a great place to startE

Dan Gingiss (07:24):
Secondly, make sure that the concept connects back to your brand. Now last season in episode 94, when we had a COVID-19 episode, we talked about Charles Schwab sending a unique email about resources to help customers through a volatile stock market when everyone else was sending those same enhanced cleaning procedures emails. Now, if we had Schwab offering virtual backgrounds of its bank branches…

Joey Coleman (07:50):
Hahaha!

Dan Gingiss (07:50):
Or for that matter, Starbucks offering stock market advice, it probably wouldn’t work!

Joey Coleman (07:55):
Stay in your lane people! Stay in your lane!

Dan Gingiss (07:57):
So companies need to find something that is quintessentially their brand. And as we know with Starbucks, their brand is all about that third place, right? Home, work, Starbucks. And bringing that third place into the home when we can’t get out to it, is quintessentially the Starbucks brand.

Joey Coleman (08:15):
Absolutely. Dan and you know, the other thing about it is so many people have a strong, visceral, emotional connection to sitting in Starbucks. Doing their email. Writing their next business plan. You know, writing their novel. Dreaming up what they’re going to do next. Just surfing the web! So “pretending” you are in Starbucks by having that virtual Zoom background is not a big leap. I mean, to your point about Schwab, if it was pretending that you were sitting in a bank branch, I don’t know about you, and this is nothing against Schwab, but I don’t have these fond multitude of memories from throughout my life of sitting in a bank. I have plenty of memories of sitting in coffee shops. And so I think that brings us to our third point, which is: have fun with this. You know, everybody is feeling unbelievable levels of stress. Unbelievable levels of uncertainty. There is a huge opportunity, I would posit, for every brand on the planet to have some fun. Everyone’s looking for a little release from the stress of the last few months. Everyone’s looking for a little bit of a pressure valve turn for the stress of what we anticipate the next few months are going to be. I mean, we need something to shake things up. And now is a great opportunity to get some of your most creative and funny and interesting employees together and brainstorm ideas for capturing your customer’s hearts and in the process, maybe a little bit of their wallet.

[SEGMENT INTRO – REDESIGNING THE EXPERIENCE]

Joey Coleman (09:48):
With a pandemic sweeping the globe and shifting the way organizations interact with their customers, many of the old ways of operating just don’t work anymore. As we all navigate a COVID-19 world, it’s time to Redesign the Experience.

[REDESIGNING THE EXPERIENCE] Classroom Creativity Allows for Student Certainty

Joey Coleman (10:07):
In the last segment, we talked about the redesigned and redefined experience of work in the COVID-19 era, but there’s another aspect of life that is being impacted in families around the world right now, and in the USA in particular.

Dan Gingiss (10:22):
I’m guessing there’s a chance you’re talking about the school experience?

Joey Coleman (10:26):
Exactly Dan. I don’t know about you, and I know your kids are a little bit older, but I feel like this conversation has been the ongoing conversation with every other set of parents or parent out there that I know. And as all parents try to navigate the shifting sands of in-person, socially distance school, or remote, virtual school, or some “pod hybrid combination” of in-person and remote.. let’s just be honest. It’s a world with many, many options, most of which, and with all due respect to the teachers and the administrators who are trying to make this work, most of which feel pretty messy and not that ideal for the teachers or the parents, let alone the students.

Dan Gingiss (11:12):
Yeah, I mean, it’s interesting because, first of all, even different schools in neighboring suburbs are making different decisions, which I think is the first thing that’s very curious. The other thing though, is that depending on your student and how they learn and their personality, one or the other may be better for them. I mean, I’ll give you an example: mMy daughter who’s 12 is pretty much an introvert and she loves staying at home and she thinks she learns more staying at home, and so the virtual thing doesn’t bother her as much. My son, who’s an extrovert, he’s 14, it kills him to be at home all the time. He wants to be out at school. So that’s kind of adding to the whole complexion of the debate around this.

Joey Coleman (11:58):
Oh 100%! And then add on top of that, so we look at the personalities, but let’s just also look at the ages. You know, your kids are older than my kids. I have a seven year old and a four year old. And as I look at my kids scenarios, you know, to ask either of my boys to socially distance at school – that will maybe last for six and a half minutes before they will be all over the other kids. And it’s not because they’re bad kids it’s because, oh, did I mention they are seven and four? Like you can’t ask a four year old to play with other four year olds and not touch them, not be close to them, not share with them. I saw a meme online today that showed a picture of, you know, a mom greeting, a little kid getting off the school bus and the kid has a mask on and the line the mom is saying is, “Oh, Billy, that’s not the mask you went to school with today?” And the kid is saying, “I know! Timmy’s mask was cooler so he traded with Johnny and Johnny traded with me and I’m like, oh my God. it’s like it’s so true! Like it was, it was put out there hopefully is a pressure release for people to not, you know, be anxious about these fears that their kid’s going to go to school. But I saw it and I was like, no, the reason it’s funny, like most jokes is because there’s an element of truth to it. And let’s be clear friends, Dan and I don’t have a horse in this race. Okay. The arguments for, and against, in-person schooling or remote schooling during a pandemic could take up every episode for the rest of this season and probably the next 10 seasons of Experience This for that matter. Okay. But because we’re a show all about experience, we wanted to share a story out of Florida that we came across that seemed very much in alignment with the Experience This philosophy of finding creative ways to create remarkable experiences. So as we redesign every type of experience we have, we wanted to highlight the work of two teachers who have created a very interesting experience in their classroom.

Dan Gingiss (13:52):
Two first grade teachers in Deland, Florida transformed their students’ desks into little Jeeps in an effort to make social distancing, less scary for their students, Patricia Dovi and Kim Martin teach at Saint Barnabas Episcopal school. They spent a week redesigning the desks, which feature tires, headlights and license plates made from construction paper. Three-sided plastic dividers that serve as windshields and side windows while also serving the practical purpose of being sneeze guards. The desks, which are spaced far apart are the only place where students are permitted to remove their face mask.

Joey Coleman (14:30):
Now, what’s so fascinating about this story is that the teachers have created a space, a space that makes students feel safe while also following the recommended health and safety guidelines. As ms. Martin explains quote, our school gave us plexiglass tri-folds, which we felt would overwhelm our little ones. So we took the design and them into little Jeeps. We add a little meet the teacher session, and we gave them keys to their car and told them that just like a motor vehicle, you have to stay in your car at all times and wear a mask. When you get out in case you come across hazardous conditions. So we’re playing on this vehicle concept to turn social distancing fun and more kid friendly.

Dan Gingiss (15:15):
As it turns out ms Dovi and ms. Martin were inspired by a kindergarten teacher in Texas who posted a photo on Instagram showing her classroom desks transformed into Jeeps as the head of the school. Paul Garcia noted. I was truly pleased to hear when the idea to decorate the first graders desks as Jeeps was presented to me, this is one example of many examples in which this team of teachers and all of our team search and find ways to make our students learning environment fun and engaging, especially during this difficult time.

Joey Coleman (15:45):
You know, Dan, I have been, as I mentioned earlier, in so many conversations with parents who are wondering, is it okay to send my kids back to school? And if I do, what are they going to, what’s their experience going to be like? And if I don’t, what is the experience going to be like? And I have to tell you as the parent of a second grader, the idea of walking into school and getting keys to the Jeep, I know is something that my son would love. In fact, both of my sons would love it. You know, a preschooler and a second grader. I just love the creativity behind this. And the way that form is meeting function, right? The design of the Jeep is not only making the kids feel comfortable and you know, it’s aesthetically pleasing and it’s creative and it’s engaging, but it’s serving this very important purpose of helping the kids not to infect each other.

Dan Gingiss (16:38):
Yeah. And you know, the part of the story that I’m kind of surprised hasn’t come up yet is why isn’t Jeep sponsoring this/!

Joey Coleman (16:48):
Great question! Hopefully someone from Jeep is listening. This is a great opportunity Jeep to make little kits and send them to all the schools, building brand awareness or, or, or all of your Jeep owners and say, Hey, here are the things we do or sponsor an individual classroom. You know, individual dealers could do stuff. I mean, the possibilities are limitless.

Dan Gingiss (17:09):
And as we said in the last segment, having a little fun is what everybody needs right now. And certainly first graders are great at having fun. And, and, you know, we learn a lot and in marketing about watching kindergartners and first graders and how they play and how they do things because it’s so creative. And there’s something that happens when we grow up where we sort of lose that creativity a little bit. And I love that, you know, and God blessed teachers because they are, you know, among the most important people in the world and drastically undervalued and undercompensated. But I love that these two women who are with first graders all day are thinking as creatively as these little kids are and really turning what could be a scary, intimidating situation into something that’s super fun.

Joey Coleman (18:00):
Dan, I totally agree with you. You know, and what I think is fascinating about this time period, we’re in, as, as you said at the outset here, the impact of COVID-19 on so many people personally, professionally, in terms of their health, in terms of their mental and emotional state, in terms of their finances, in terms of their career prospects, in terms of loss of life has been earth shattering, it’s been absolutely devastating. And yet there is some hope. There is a glimmer that we can look to and say, but this is different. This is exciting. Here’s somebody that’s, you know, taking the lemons and turning them into lemonade. You know, I was having a conversation with a buddy of mine who’s an entrepreneur by the name of Steve Weaver, and he commented that if we were to go back a hundred years in time and grab someone and through a time machine, bring them into the present, everything they interacted with would seem radically different to them. Except education. Education is the one area of our lives where the way we did this a hundred years ago is the same way we do it today: A teacher standing in the front of a classroom with a bunch of students sitting in desks, feet on the floor, facing forward, you know, hands on their desk, not fidgeting, not moving, supposed to just write their lessons, hand in their homework. We’re grading it by hand, et cetera, et cetera. That is the way most schools operate today. And while a visitor from a hundred years ago would be like, wait, what a telephone? Oh my gosh, TV cars. What are you talking about? They would see all these things and be in shock. If you wanted to comfort them, you take them to the classroom. So one of the silver linings here I think is that the world of education has been forced because of COVID-19 to step into the modern era in an entirely new way. And I know that’s uncomfortable for the teachers. It’s potentially uncomfortable for some of the students and the parents, but I think it’s long overdue.

Dan Gingiss (20:03):
Well, and why are we sitting here talking about classrooms on a business show? The answer is because what Joey just said about education being forced into change is what most of us are feeling in our businesses today. No matter what industry we’re in it, name an industry. And it’s been forced into change in the last few months. And I think what’s great about this story is that it is taking this forced change. And it’s saying, all right, we got this right. We’re going to roll with this. And we’re going to do something different and better. And like many things that I think are going to come out of this pandemic. I bet maybe they’ll get rid of the plexiglass a windows, but I’ll bet those Jeep stay because the kids love it. And because it’s fun. And the whole idea of handing them the keys to their education every year is brilliant. And so I think the lesson is that we can all be more creative. We can all have more fun and we can lean into the change that the pandemic has required of us rather than resent it or be fearful of it or worse push up against it.

Joey Coleman (21:13):
Ooo Dan, I love that phrase. You must have been a marketer handing them the keys to their education. I love it. I love it. Like kids are excited to go to school. Why not make everyone excited to go to school? I mean, as a parent walking into that classroom, I would be excited friends. We are only limited in this crazy pandemic time, by our own creativity, there are opportunities to enhance the experience. It’s just how willing are you to try something new, to innovate, to shift it up, to change it around. I’d like to conclude this segment with some words from Ms. Martin, one of the first grade teachers who brought Jeep desk into the classroom, “[a]ll of us have some sort of anxiety about going back to school. It’s going to look a hundred percent different than it’s looked in my 20 years of teaching. But our goal is making our kids happy. The playfulness will help them cope.” If only we could all focus a little bit more on the playfulness we could use to help all of us.

Dan Gingiss (22:27):
I think it’s time to tell them.

Joey Coleman (22:28):
Really. Are you sure?

Dan Gingiss (22:30):
Yeah. I think it’s time.

Joey Coleman (22:33):
Okay. You know, I’m going to trust your gut on this one day in and let’s do it. You know, we’ve teased about this a little bit in the previous episodes. And I think it’s time to make the official announcement.

Dan Gingiss (22:44):
Thanks to the support and encouragement from our good friends at Avtex.

Joey Coleman (22:51):
Who as our loyal listeners know are our partners in creating the Experience This Show for the third consecutive year!

Dan Gingiss (22:58):
We have a new show coming your way, and it’s called Experience Points.

Joey Coleman (23:05):
Experience Points is a new game show all about customer and employee experience. We want to share the best strategies and tactics for creating remarkable experiences while featuring some truly fun and exciting contestants. When you tune into experience points, which will be available in video form and as an audio podcast, you’ll get to see our quote unquote, celebrity contestants, answer questions about customer and employee experience and share their thoughts on how to make your interactions remarkable. Now, in the show, we play a series of three games and each time a contestant answers a question correctly, they win points. These points then turn into dollars for the charity of the contestants choosing thanks to a generous donation from our friends at Aztecs who transform customer experience through CX design and orchestration.

Speaker 2 (24:00):
Now, Joey and I have started recording some of these episodes and we can tell you without a doubt, this show is going to be so much fun. It’s a hoot friends. It’s going to be awesome. We’ve got great contestants lined up, including the godfather of customer service, Shep Hyken innovation,

Speaker 3 (24:18):
An expert and trend spotter, Rohit

Speaker 2 (24:22):
GABA, New York times bestseller and keynote speaker Che bear,

Speaker 3 (24:27):
Executive coaching and attention strategist, Neen, James,

Speaker 2 (24:32):
Small business coach and speaker preneur Marquesas way,

Speaker 3 (24:36):
The incredibly energetic and wildly entertaining owner of the Savannah bananas, baseball team, Jesse,

Speaker 2 (24:44):
And many, many more

Speaker 3 (24:47):
The show is coming in a few weeks. So keep your eyes open on social media and your ears on this podcast for the official kickoff announcement. And if you’re so inclined, we’d love to have you check out

Speaker 2 (24:59):
Experience points

Speaker 3 (25:03):
With a pandemic, sweeping the globe and shifting the way organizations interact with their customers. Many of the old ways of operating just don’t work anymore. As we all navigate a COVID-19 world, it’s time to redesign the experience.

Speaker 2 (25:22):
Hey Joey, remember those Capri sun juice pouches from when you were a kid?

Speaker 3 (25:27):
I don’t know if the phrase when you were a kid necessarily applies. Cause I was thinking that I was probably drinking some Capri sun juice pouches, well into high school. So yeah, I know what you’re talking about. I think the jingle, I seem to remember it was kind of like a Capri sun and then there would be this radio announcer voice saying like now available in the hologram packaging, you know, and that kind of thing. So yeah, they were tasty little, uh, I remember him, it’s like a summer drink, you know, poke the pouch with the straw. I have a nice little energy drink and get back to your plan.

Speaker 2 (25:58):
Exactly. Well, the marketer in me had to share this story because I think Capri sun is doing something absolutely brilliant in response to the COVID-19 pandemic and the new school experiences that we talked about in the last segment. So I happened upon a full page ad in the Chicago Tribune. Ooh, that’s a big deal full page ad. It is. And it showed a picture of a new pouch, which you’ll you’ll find out about in a moment. And, and I’m going to read the words, it’s a couple of paragraphs, but it kind of imagined this ad in, in sort of a fun type face. So it’s not like a tight thing or it’s like, and something fun. Yes, exactly. So the title of it says, we’re sorry. And here’s what it reads. We’re sorry that recess is on recess. We’re sorry that masks aren’t just for Halloween.

Speaker 2 (26:52):
And most importantly, we’re sorry that the Capri sun pouches you’ll be receiving at school are filled with filtered water. We know that when you reach for our pouch, you expect your favorite juice drink, but sometimes things don’t go as planned, especially in times as weird as these, some of us wanted to be astronauts didn’t happen. We’re in the juice game and proud of it. And now apparently in the water game too, you may be asking where’s the juice well with water fountains at many of your schools off limits, we want to help make sure you get the filtered water. You need to help you stay hydrated so you can grow and thrive. That’s why we’re giving students across Chicago land Capri sun. We’re sorry. It’s not juice. When they come back to class, is it kid’s number one? Favorite juice drink? Not even close, but although it may not be the pouch you want right now, it’s the pouch. You need your friends at CAPRISA. And then at the bottom of the ad, maybe my favorite part, it says, we’re sorry, kids. You’re welcome parents.

Speaker 3 (27:58):
I love it. I love it. Oh, there’s so many things about this or that are brilliant. Dan, first of all, talk about creative copy, right? It just speaks the truth. You know, we’ve talked about the last two segments, this idea of leading with empathy and acknowledging the elephant in the room. And this ad clearly does that, but it’s also a little bit irreverent and it’s fun. And it’s on brand for Capri sun. I mean, if you think back to their commercials from when you were a kid or even just the memories, you might have a drinking, a Capri sun, it was not, this stayed kind of, Hey, this is a buttoned up drink. No, it was meant to be fun. It was meant to be playful. It was meant to be entertaining and engaging. And I feel like the ad is doing that, especially since they’re almost like, it almost seems like they’re slightly apologetic for the fact that it’s just water, not juice, but they hit with a really important reason as to why they’re doing

Speaker 2 (28:52):
Well. Yeah. And so the picture that I mentioned before is of a fairly plain looking Caprice on pouch. And it says, Capri sun, we’re sorry, it’s not juice. Like, that’s the name of the product? And the other thing I thought was fascinating because I mean, this is a newspaper ad that is written to kids now. Clearly kids are not reading newspapers, right? So clearly this is really aimed at the parents. But the other thing that accompanied this ad that I thought was downright hilarious is they created a video that was essentially pretending that they were doing focus groups with kids about this new tranq, except they weren’t actually telling them what was in it. And so they go to these kids and they’re like, Hey, we’re here from CAPRISA. We like your kids. Yeah. Would I get to try a new flavor? They taste it. And the expression out of their faces is just awesome. And they’re like kind of tastes plain. I think this one is, I think it’s just, what are the whole thing is absolutely hilarious. So we actually have some audio from this commercial and we’d love to play it. You definitely have to see it to see the kids’ faces, but you’ll get a great idea of what it’s about just by listening. Here we go.

Speaker 4 (30:14):
And this is a joke. It doesn’t have any free from flying. It’s it’s just, what does it taste like? My mouth tastes like water it’s wire, having a water break, a preset hit or miss mess. Is there anything you wish Capri sun did differently? Probably not make it water. That’s a great note.

Speaker 2 (30:38):
I love when companies are willing to either poke a little fun at themselves or be self-deprecating or just add some wittiness or humor to a situation that kinda warranted. I mean, you know, they don’t want to be making water pouches, but they are. They’ve been, we talked in a previous segment about having to pivot and having to adapt and doing so creatively. And so they’re doing a great thing by putting those water in school and then they’re making it fun. And I think that’s, again, the marketer in me is what loved this. Well, and I, I love the playfulness and I know you are a longtime fan of the witty, Dan, there’s also a throwback to the nostalgia piece of this, right? Like, as you said, the ad is written to kids, but let’s be candid. It’s written to the kid who now has kids, right.

Speaker 2 (31:27):
It’s written to the parent who grew up on CAPRISA and who’s now reading this going, Oh, it’s not your dad’s Capri sun or your mom’s Capri sun. It’s the new Capri sun. That is the COVID-19 Capri sun, which means it’s not juice, it’s water, which is just it’s playful. It’s engaging. And from like a brand strategy point of view, it really allows them, I think, to kind of cleave off this experience when we get on the other side of COVID-19, right? So whether they continue to make water pouches or not, it’s like they created this little moment in time, not only with the product, but with the messaging that ideally, you know, their audience feeling good about Capri sun, whether they’re buying the water pouch or they’re buying the juice. Exactly. And you know, to be clear, they’re not the only company that has adapted their product because of COVID-19.

Speaker 2 (32:19):
We’ve read about a lot of alcohol companies, for example, making hand sanitizer and literally shutting down their facilities in order to pump out more hand sanitizer, we’ve heard about automobile companies making, you know, medical equipment. And so there’s a lot of companies that have done things like this. What I thought was different about this was the fact that they were able to turn it into really fun marketing and to just get people, to relax and laugh a little bit, which frankly we all need. Because as we’ve mentioned now, a couple of times on this episode, everybody’s stressed out. Everybody just wants to kind of exhale. And if you read something funny or you watch this video on YouTube, which is, you know, really will make you laugh. Even if you’re not a parent it’s these kids are, are awesome. I just think that’s what the, what we all need right now, which is why I loved it.

Speaker 3 (33:13):
Yeah. And it’s, it’s almost like it’s a little bit of a throwback to a simpler time, right? I don’t know about you, Dan, but when I think back to being a kid, not only was I not worried about a pandemic, but I wasn’t worried about much of anything. You know what I mean? You’re just being a kid. And I think one of the pieces of this puzzle that so many parents are struggling with is looking at kids today and thinking, what are the longterm implications of the stress that they’re under? And these shifts in these changes. Now, the good thing is kids are resilient. And as a general rule, kids don’t know any different. I mean, we were talking about our boys and it’s like, for all, my son knows that age seven, you have a pandemic every seven years, right? Like his frame of reference is pretty small compared to his father’s who it’s like, Oh my gosh, I haven’t had a pandemic in my life and I’m fast approaching half a century old. So it’s one of those things where I love the nostalgia play here, combined with the playfulness combined with the innovation of let’s take our product in a new direction, in response to what’s going on in the world.

Speaker 2 (34:22):
Yeah. And I do want to clarify for our audience, Joey is the older one. So true. So I don’t know anything about a half year.

Speaker 3 (34:30):
You couldn’t tell by the, uh, the hair hairlines, but I am indeed the older of the two.

Speaker 2 (34:36):
Exactly, exactly. So I think to, to kind of conclude on this one, if you are in really any business, you have pivoted and you had to do something different for your customers. And as we said, at the outset of this episode, a lot of the things that we’re doing right now are probably going to outlast the pandemic. And even if they don’t literally, like, let’s say, Capri sun does not continue to make water pouches, what will outlast the pandemic is how people feel about the brand because of how the brand treated them at this moment in time. And I think I give kudos to the company for being brave and for being creative and for putting something out in the marketplace that not only is obviously helpful and useful and healthy to the students, I should say, by the way, they were giving away these pouches, they’re not selling them. So they, they gave them away to a whole bunch of schools in the Chicago land area. So they’re only doing a good thing, but they’re also brand building and they’re doing it in a way that doesn’t say, go out and buy CAPRISA. It says, we’re a great company. We’re here to help we’re here when you need us. And that’s what people are looking for right now. So I say, kudos, great job.

Speaker 1 (35:59):
Wow. Thanks for joining us. For another episode of experience this we know there are tons of podcasts to listen, to magazines and books, to read reality TV, to watch. We don’t take for granted that you’ve decided to spend some quality time listening to the two of us. We hope you enjoyed our discussions. And if you do, we’d love to hear about it. Come on over to experience this show.com and let us know what segments you enjoyed, what new segments you’d like to hear. This show is all about experience and we want you to be part of the experience.

Speaker 2 (36:30):
Yes, Joe, thanks again for your time. And we’ll see you next week for more experience.