Redesign The Experience

With a pandemic sweeping the globe and shifting the way organizations interact with their customers, many of the old ways of operating just don’t work anymore. As we all navigate a COVID-19 world, it’s time to Redesign the Experience.

Episode 129 – Video Energizing or Video Fatigue?

Join us as we discuss enticing your customers to come back after COVID, videos that capture your brand spirit, and managing camera fatigue in a video-based business environment.

Flying, Speedriding, and Zooming – Oh My!

Referenced in the Show

• Delta Airlines Entices Flyers with Enhanced Rewards

• MUST WATCH: Speedriding Through An Alpine Resort – From Avoriaz With Love – by Red Bull

• Citi Creates ‘Zoom-Free Fridays’ to Combat Pandemic Fatigue – by Anna Schaverien in the New York Times

Host Contact Information

Email Dan: Dan@dangingiss.com

Tweet Dan Gingiss: @DGingiss

Email Joey: JoeyC@JoeyColeman.com

DanGingiss.com

JoeyColeman.com

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Episode Transcript

Download an unedited transcript of Episode 129 here or read it below:

Joey Coleman (00:05):
Welcome to Experience This!

Dan Gingiss (00:08):
The podcast that celebrates remarkable customer experiences and inspires you to stand out from the competition by wowing your customers.

Joey Coleman (00:17):
Each episode, we bring you a healthy dose of inspiring stories, funny interactions, and practical takeaways, marketing and customer experience thought leader, Dan Gingiss…

Dan Gingiss (00:30):
shares the mic with customer retention and employee experience expert, Joey Coleman, helping you to get people talking about your business.

Joey Coleman (00:40):
So get ready because it’s time to Experience This!

Joey Coleman (00:48):
Get ready, for another episode of the Experience This Show.

Dan Gingiss (00:53):
Join us as we discuss enticing your customers to come back after COVID videos that capture your brand spirit and managing camera fatigue in a video-based business environment.

Joey Coleman (01:08):
Flying, Speedriding, and Zooming – oh my!

Joey Coleman (01:15):
With a pandemic sweeping the globe, and shifting the way organizations interact with their customers, many of the old ways of operating just don’t work anymore. As we all navigate a COVID-19 world, it’s time to Redesign the Experience.

Joey Coleman (01:34):
It’s been a long time Dan, but it’s time to talk about flying again.

Dan Gingiss (01:40):
Ahhhh, I’ve been waiting for this. Have you been on a plane?

Joey Coleman (01:42):
I actually have not, but I’m starting to think about it a lot more and will likely be on a plane sometime in the not too distant future. Vaccines are up. COVID infections are down. Events are starting to happen again. It’s exciting. And what I wanted to talk about is all of the businesses that have seen their loyal customers, who while staying loyal, just haven’t been doing as much business in the last year.

Dan Gingiss (02:08):
Oh, you mean like our friends at the airlines?

Joey Coleman (02:10):
Yes indeed, like the airlines. And as anyone who listens to Experience This knows…

Dan Gingiss (02:16):
Wait a minute! I think I know what you’re going to say. You like Delta don’t you?!

Joey Coleman (02:19):
No, I don’t like Delta, Dan. I love Delta! I love flying on Delta for a host of reasons, but because of changes in the event industry over the last year, I haven’t needed to fly to any of the conferences or events that I normally would to give speeches at. I’ve been doing all my presentations remotely as have you. And now, as businesses are starting to think about hosting in-person events and conferences this summer, and especially into the fall, I’m getting a lot of inquiries for these upcoming events, which means naturally I’m thinking about flying again. Now that being said, you know, who else was thinking about me flying again, Dan?

Dan Gingiss (02:56):
Uh, your wife, your kids. I don’t know? Who?

Joey Coleman (03:01):
You are. Correct. All of those people are, but I’m talking specifically about the fantastic folks at Delta airlines. The reason I know they’re thinking about this is because I received an email this week outlining some fantastic new bonuses that they have to entice fliers to come back now as noted by Dwight James, who is the Senior Vice President of Customer Engagement and Loyalty and the CEO of Delta Vacations, and I quote, “[o]ur customers, supported us through the most difficult year in our history. And as we welcome them back, we want to help their travel count for even more. We sincerely appreciate how much our customers value their status and these industry leading offers will ensure Medallion Members can continue to enjoy those benefits for flights now, and in the future.” Now the message went on to detail, a series of new enhancements to the Delta loyalty program, including earning up to 75% more miles towards your medallion status on nearly every Delta flight, earning miles toward your medallion status with award travel (this is a first ever in the airline industry – normally if you use your miles to get a free ticket, you don’t get to get miles for that free ticket. Now they’re actually going to let you accrue miles on your award tickets) and all of these bonuses will be “credited to customer’s accounts for a seamless experience.”

Dan Gingiss (04:31):
American Airlines… I hope you’re listening because you’re going to be next I suspect! But Hey, I mean, I love it. I’m a, I’m a rewards guy spent a lot of time in loyalty marketing and you know, those are fantastic. They’re rich, uh, which basically means I hate to break your bubble, they’re probably going to be temporary, but I think it’s a great time for temporary richness, if you will, because you know, people are – even frequent flyers like us are still hesitant to go back to flying. We probably won’t go back to as much flying as we were doing at, you know, at least for a while, maybe ever. And so the airlines have some work to do to get people back in their seats. And I think as usual Delta seems to be leading the way in terms of enticing people.

Joey Coleman (05:21):
You know, Dan, I feel the same way. And I think the interesting thing about this outreach is it’s coming at a time where a lot of frequent flyers like you like me are just really starting to seriously think about this. Like to be honest, last summer, you couldn’t have paid me to get on an airplane. And that’s not a criticism of any of the airplanes I love flying. It’s just, it didn’t make sense with the pandemic. But now as things start to change now, as people start to consider it, what I think is fantastic about the timing of this message is that as I’m starting to think about, they’re in my inbox saying, Hey, by the way, when you’re ready, no pressure, but when you’re ready, we’re going to do some amazing things for you. Now what’s interesting is this all comes on the heels of the things Delta did last year to make the experience better for the frequent flyers – including being the first airline to extend 2020 flyer status into 2021, and the only airline to offer rollover status miles, which are kind of known as MQMS in Delta airlines, speak to give customers a headstart on their 2022 status.

Dan Gingiss (06:31):
So you’re saying that miles you earned before the pandemic in 2020 are counting now?

Joey Coleman (06:39):
Not only are they counting for my status, now they are actually rolling over and counting towards my next status. What Delta did is they said, look, the pandemic has changed everything, whatever status you have in 2020, we’re automatically giving you that status in 2021, regardless of how you fly in 2020. Oh. And by the way, if you do happen to fly in 2020 or 2021, any extra miles that you’ve accrued across those two years will kick into your status for 2022. So they are doing these amazing things to really reward people for doing the behavior they want, which is getting on airplanes. They also made a bunch of other improvements to their upgrade certificates. They made the more rewarding and easier to use. Their companion tickets – so any companion tickets that were going to expire in 2020, they extended to 2021. And they just announced that all of those are being extended out to 2022. So all these companions tickets that I had, that I would’ve been frustrated that I wasn’t able to use because we weren’t flying. They’re like, man, don’t worry about it. You have till the middle of 20, 22 to use those as well as extending other deadlines around using your benefits. So they could take into account that delays in people’s travel plans that have happened over the last year.

Dan Gingiss (07:55):
Yeah. Well, and basically we talk about knowing your customer and we’ve talked about that at no time in the past, and hopefully the future, will there ever have been more clarity about understanding what your customers are going through because everybody went through the same thing at the same time. And so I think Delta is smart in the sense that, you know, they understand they got to get people back on planes. They understand that customers like you, who are the, I dunno, what are you the triple diamond deleted, double, double dare, whatever status is. I mean, these are the people they really need back and their most loyal customers. And you know, they’re what I like about these examples is they’re very timely right there. They understand what frequent travelers who pay attention to this stuff MQMS and miles and, you know, qualifying dollars and all this sort of stuff that they understand what you’re thinking about. And the fact that, Oh man, I traveled for three months in 2020, and I was well on my way. And then I lost them all. And, and they’re addressing that almost before. It becomes a frustration, which I think is great.

Joey Coleman (09:05):
I couldn’t agree more, Dan. And here’s the interesting thing and why I wanted to talk about this. This doesn’t just apply to the airlines. Every business on the planet over the last year that had any type of in-person interaction with their customers – whether you had a retail store, whether you had an event venue that people came to hotels, airlines, other forms of a mass transportation gathering places, you name it, movie theaters, anywhere where people came to visit, they’re now going to start thinking about going there again – but people are going to be anxious. And they’re going to be anxious for good reason. We’re not judging the anxiousness that people have. And a lot of business owners are like, ah, already come, come visit our store. We need the business. We want you back. Everything’s clean, everything’s safe. We’re good to go. The moral, that story here is we are going beyond the medical realities and now we’re starting to dip into the psychological realities of our customer base. And so I think what Delta is doing is really leading the way by to your point, being rich with what they’re offering and going above and beyond, you know, they, you notice they don’t say that these are going to be the rules forever. They’re just saying, Hey, for the, basically the second half of 2021, we’re going to do a bunch of things that will excite you to get back on planes. So what’s the moral of the story here. Let your customers know that you’re ready to welcome them back to in-person interactions. Welcome them on their schedule. Not your schedule. Consider some gracious enticements to get them to come back sooner rather than later, or at least to feel well provided for when they do come back. You don’t need to make these changes permanently, but take some steps now to kind of juice things up and make it exciting for them so that they come back extend any deadlines that you have friends pandemics. Aren’t the time for policies. I said this on the show a year ago, as we entered the challenging COVID era. And here we are a year later, and guess what? This same message holds true. Pandemics aren’t the time for policies. So switch your policies to be even more customer centric and more customer focused than they were before. And if you do all these things, your customers will come back in the weeks and months to come.

Joey Coleman (11:27):
We love telling stories and sharing key insights you can implement or avoid based on our experiences. Can you believe that This Just Happened?

Joey Coleman (11:41):
You know, Dan, last week I saw a video online and then within about 36 hours, I’d say no, fewer than 10 of my friends emailed a link to this video. Now I know if I were to ask you to guess what this video is about, I would be opening myself to all kinds of ridicule and jokes that you might have. So let me just say this…

Dan Gingiss (12:03):
Who me?

Joey Coleman (12:03):
Surprise, surprise! Let me just say this. The video was of something called ski riding. Now I had never seen ski riding before ski riding is what happens evidently based on this video, when you put on a pair of skis and you’re wearing a paraglider, which is like a controllable parachute that you can inflate from the ground as opposed to jumping out of an airplane. So this is, think of a combination of paragliding, i.e. parachuting, through a mountain ski town, while you’re also wearing skis, doing stunts and tricks.

Dan Gingiss (12:44):
This sounds like a X Games sport or something like that…

Joey Coleman (12:47):
It does sound like an X Game sport, which is probably not surprising then that the sponsor of this video was actually red bull. Oh, red bull. Yeah. Well, they’ve had some interesting stunts in the past they have, and this is kind of the newest piece. So what I’d like to do ladies and gentlemen, I know this is an audio based show. So it’s going to be little weird to talk about a video without you having seen the video. So what I’d like you to do is press pause, go to the shownotes at ExperienceThisShow.com and at the very top, you’re going to see a big link to the Red Bull ski riding video. And I want you to watch the video. Now, if you happen to be driving or working out right now, and you’re not going to do it, I’m going to play for you the first minute of the video with some narration, but please I’ve never implored with such a emphasis. Go watch this video. It is insane. Just even what you’re about to witness the feet of human extreme sports nature that is captured in this video, that alone is we’re seeing not to mention what we’re going to talk about. All right? So here’s the deal. When you go to the video, here’s what you’ll see.

Joey Coleman (14:04):
You hear the wind blowing through your air. As the skier comes over, does a loop. He’s flying through the air. There’s a drone behind him tracking down the mountain as he goes to over trees. And now he’s cutting between two buildings. That sound, you just heard that one, and that one, that’s him actually running into the sides of buildings with his skis. Now here that like the laser sound, that’s his skis on the metal that is the chairlift, not actually on the chairs, but on the metal cables, connecting the chairs. This is insane. He’s parachuting down. He just almost hit some birds. And now off the railing and he’s going off the snow with the top of buildings. Now, his feet are actually on the ground. The first time he’s grabbing the parachute and he’s bundling it up into a ball in front of him. Now he’s tucking down and he’s going faster and faster. Oh my goodness. He just went through an igloo, jumped out of the other side, do a flip he’s firing off. Oh my God, she’s got a can of Red Bull. He’s drinking red bull. He just threw it in the recycling bin. Now he’s, reinflating the parachute you skiing around. Okay. Oh my goodness. We could go on. I have given you a minute and six seconds of this video that is over two minutes long. It is crazy. It’s crazy to see this now, why would I want to tell you about a video? Because the video captured so much excitement, so much spirit for the brand and showed me things that I didn’t even think was possible. And as a result, I wanted to talk about what I had seen. Now. Here’s the crazy thing. Who is the video for stopping to remember the beginning of this conversation? When Dan said, Oh, it sounds like an X games type of thing. And I told you the brand, we’ve only mentioned the brand once, but I’d be willing to bet you remember who it was. Dan, who is the brand?

Dan Gingiss (15:59):
I’m going to go with red bull for 200.

Joey Coleman (16:04):
That would be red bull.

Dan Gingiss (16:05):
So Dan, are you a red bull drinker? What do you know about red bull? I am not a red bull drinker. I tasted it once. It is, let’s just say not for me. And, uh, but I, I associate it with extreme sports with, with people that are outdoor Z, you know, doing all these sports, I kind of like to keep my feet on the ground. And so I kinda, I, I associated with people who are more willing to have their feet off the ground. Let’s put it that way.

Joey Coleman (16:33):
A little crazy, a little adventurous. And here’s the reason I wanted to talk about this. Red Bull has made an aspirational video. Even if you never have any intention, Dan, of putting skis on and attaching yourself to a parachute and speedriding through an Alpine town that appears abandoned in the video, doing flips in the air, bouncing off buildings, sliding down the cables of a chairlift at a ski resort, you can appreciate what you saw. And I think the takeaway that I had as it relates to customer experience is we talk so often about the features and the benefits of our products. You know, this is the very elements of our products. You know, here are the components of our service. Here’s what it’s going to do for your business. And we don’t as often talk about the aspirational aspects of our products and our services, what type of people use our products and services? What type of people do our customers become because of our products and services. And if we think back to commercials, you may have seen in the past from Red Bull, they drank it in these little wings appear and they kind of float off the characters. The whole idea is that red bull takes you to a different level of the human experience that you didn’t think was possible.

Dan Gingiss (17:58):
Yeah, it’s very brand, right. I mean, I remember the viral video around the guy that was jumping out of the, what was it, a rocket ship, any, uh, he jumped out of it with

Joey Coleman (18:09):
Exactly. Yeah. They basically put them up in a balloon into space and he jumped out and fell all the way back down to earth.

Dan Gingiss (18:17):
It definitely has an element of crazy to it, but that’s the brand. And I think that today, I always talk about something slightly different, but I, I talk about being witty and being humorous and those are two different things and that there’s only certain brands and I think of brands like Taco Bell or Wendy’s that kind of have permission to be humorous. And unfortunately, most of us don’t work for Taco Bell or Wendy’s, it’s our brand probably doesn’t have that permission.

Joey Coleman (18:44):
And then why do you think they have permission? Because I think that’s an interesting way to put it. I have an idea of why they have permission. Why do you think they have permission to be that way?

Dan Gingiss (18:54):
Well, first of all, I think their target audience is, is fairly specifically at a younger, a younger type of person, a millennial and younger, uh, who appreciates that kind of a humor. And I think over time, actually, I think they’ve built that permission and built the reputation over time of being humorous, funny brands, much as Red Bull has built this reputation of being, you know, an extreme sports, loving, daredevil type brand, which again, your listeners listening your brand probably isn’t that, but that’s okay because your brand is probably something else is really what I’m saying.

Joey Coleman (19:34):
Agreed. And I think when you say, you know, they have permission to do that. I think part of the reason I agree with you wholeheartedly, that they built that equity over time with their target markets and what their customers, that that’s kind of the edginess or that’s the aspect of their brand spirit. But I also think they made a decision to go in and just be who they were. To just show up fully without any apology for what their brand was. We’ve all come to appreciate the brand of Wendy’s on social media. We’ve all come to appreciate the extreme nature of Red Bull, whether it’s in their videos, whether it’s in their sponsorships, the crazy stunts they do, you know, kind of the feature film-type level production that they create. And I think the conversation that I’d love our listeners to have is to meet with your teams and talk about what is the aspirational version of our brand. When people use our products, when people use our services, what does it allow them to be? And really extend that out beyond just the benefits to speak more to this type of person uses our product. You know, Dan, you, and it is often back and forth about Apple vs. PC, right? And I am a 100% Apple guy. Through and through. I know you use a lot of Apple products as well, but I think Apple has basically created a brand that people take pride in being an Apple person, because Apple is owning the brand and the aesthetic of their videos, the aesthetic of their ads, the messaging of their communications, all align with that brand in the same way that red bulls aligned with their brand with this crazy skiing video. So what do we do from here? I’m not suggesting that you take your CEO, strap them into a parachute, put some skis on them and throw them down the side of a mountain. Okay. What I am suggesting is that you think of creative ways to capture your brand spirit. As much as you create advertising and things that are designed to promote your brand and promote your service, I would love it. If you would start to consider creating aspirational communications – things that capture your brand spirit, promote that and let people know who they can be when they experience your brand.

Joey Coleman (21:56):
Almost everyone has interacted with chatbots but all too often, it’s been a bad experience. In MythBusters – presented by Solvvy – we explore a common myth about CX chatbots and see how the right technology can create a positive experience every time.

Joey Coleman (22:20):
Today’s myth about chatbots? Chatbots, can’t drive revenue for your business. At this point, CX and support leaders probably understand that an intelligent chat bot and automation platform can help deliver huge savings and productivity improvements. A next gen chat bot instantly resolves 50% plus of customer issues before support tickets are needed and frees up agents to handle the most challenging issues.

Dan Gingiss (22:48):
But can a chat bot actually drive additional revenue for your business? Why? Yes, it can. With the next gen chatbot companies now have a powerful tool to help would be customers quickly find what they’re looking for, enabling better and faster purchases. Chatbots handle product or service questions for shoppers and provide intelligent recommendations based on the chat or other contextual clues. Your customers will love not having to hunt around a website to find what they need. And some chatbots let you drop items right into a shopping cart or buy directly that’s instant chat bot revenue.

Joey Coleman (23:24):
For your current customers or subscribers, how cool would it be if your support chat bot was able to help them add additional software licenses, right? When they ask or help them upgrade from a free meme account to a paid account.

Dan Gingiss (23:39):
Or help them take advantage of an extended deadline and a companion certificate on Delta Airlines to get you to book your flight?!

Joey Coleman (23:45):
Exactly. If your team handles these sorts of critical transactions, you know, they can often result in phone calls that take up a ton of agent time. And the intelligent chat bot means faster transactions for your customers, lower agent involvement, and you guessed it more revenue from your team.

Dan Gingiss (24:05):
And that’s another myth busted, thanks to our friends and podcast supporters at Solvvy – the NextGen chatbot. Find them at Solvvy.com. That’s S-O-L-V-V-Y.com.

Joey Coleman (24:21):
There are so many great customer experience articles to read, but who has the time?! We summarize them and offer clear takeaways you can implement starting tomorrow. Enjoy this segment of CX Press – where we read the articles so you don’t need to!

Joey Coleman (24:39):
Dan, I have a question for you. What is the greatest number of zoom calls you’ve done in a single day?

Dan Gingiss (24:47):
Oh boy. Well, I wouldn’t call it great by any stretch of imagination, but I’d say probably in the neighborhood of eight or nine is maybe my tops.

Joey Coleman (24:55):
Wow, wow. Yeah. I’m not sure what my record count number is for the number of calls. But the other day I got on my first Zoom call at 6:45 AM and I didn’t get off my last Zoom call of the day until 10:00 PM. And I had a total of 60 minutes throughout the day in frankly, 10 to 20 minute chunks, when I wasn’t on Zoom. And to be honest, that’s why today’s CX press story written by Anna Schaverien – who’s a reporter for the New York Times who covers news from her home base in London – resonated so much with me. The article is titled, “Citi creates Zoom-free Fridays to Combat Pandemic Fatigue,” and it details plans that the bank has to create one day each week, when workers can avoid being on camera for internal calls.

Dan Gingiss (25:45):
For a minute there, I thought you were talking about like an entire city, but you’re talking about the bank.

Joey Coleman (25:49):
Yes. Citi banks, Citi Group – they’re mostly known for Citibank.

Dan Gingiss (25:53):
Indeed, well, I love this idea. And in fact, because of a LinkedIn post recently from, uh, our mutual friend, Dorie Clark, I actually have started blocking Fridays off of my calendar for similar reasons is that you just sometimes need a day to get work done. And you know, one of the biggest reasons I left corporate America was I hated the meetings. I just didn’t like going back to back to back to back to all these meetings. And I always found that there were certain colleagues, who will remain nameless, that it’s like the meetings were what made them feel important.

Joey Coleman (26:28):
Meeings about meetings?!

Dan Gingiss (26:32):
Well, if they weren’t in the meeting, they didn’t feel like they were included. And so they were always, well, you know, invite me to the meeting. And I was like, don’t invite me to the meeting because when I’m in meetings, I’m not getting work done. And I think that’s what guessing this article kind of gets at is, man we could spend all day on Zoom, but are you actually being productive?

Joey Coleman (26:50):
A couple of things. And you’re, you’re spot on Dan and I to applaud our mutual friend, Dorie Clark friends, listeners, if you’re not familiar with Dorie and her fantastic books, her courses on LinkedIn Learning, her blog posts, her articles that she writes, she’s absolutely incredible! And you’re right. I think over the last year what’s happened is people have gotten comfortable with rolling out of bed, into a virtual meeting or spending all day. As I like to think of it sometime dressed very nicely on top with sweat pants on the bottom and this whole proliferation of video calls, whether that’s with our prospects, with our customers, even with our coworkers and our colleagues has just become exhausting. And that’s why Citi group decided to start this new end of week tradition. So going forward, they’re going to have zoom free Fridays. Now the bank’s new chief executive Jane Frazier announced this plan in a memo sent to employees: “Recognizing that workers have spent inordinate amounts of time of the past 12 months, staring at video calls, Citi is now encouraging its employees to take a step back from Zoom and other video conferencing platforms for one day every week.

Dan Gingiss (27:58):
You know, it’s funny. I just have to interrupt you for a second because I’ve been thinking about this, that Zoom is becoming one of those brands that is also a verb – like Google, or Xerox.

Joey Coleman (28:13):
Exactly. Yeah. It’s the most… prior to this, Google was the big one in our society that, uh, a brand name that it become a verb, and I agree with you in the last year, Zoom has become a verb.

Dan Gingiss (28:24):
And, and so we should say, just given that this is talking about Zoom-free Fridays, that obviously this is not a knock on Zoom. It’s really video conferencing free Fridays, but that’s a little harder to say.

Joey Coleman (28:34):
Absolutely. And I will say zoom, I think is probably a case study for the business that is handled the pandemic the best. Can you think of any other business, maybe like online grocery store delivery that has seen the huge growth that Zoom has seen over the course of the last year. And as much as we might be experiencing Zoom fatigue, they’ve done a remarkable job delivering a consistent, fantastic experience.

Dan Gingiss (29:00):
Yeah, absolutely. And there’s, I know some great people that work there. It’s a terrific company. So Frazier who’s the CEO of Citi group said in this article and I’m quoting “[t]he blurring of lines between home and work and the relentlessness of the pandemic Workday have taken a toll on our wellbeing. After listening to colleagues around the world, it became apparent. We need to combat the Zoom fatigue that many of us feel” end quote. The memo went on to note that going forward, no one at the company would have to turn their video on for any internal meetings on Fridays. External meetings with clients and regulators that need to happen via Zoom still will happen that way, even if it’s on a Friday.

Joey Coleman (29:39):
Yeah. So they’re still going to have video. They’re still going to, you know, use that as a tool. They just want to be more conscious about it. Now what’s interesting is this all too common phrase of zoom fatigue that we’ve heard about has led to some recent research from Stanford university that they talked about in the article and the research was trying to figure out why video calls feel so draining and in a peer reviewed article that was published in the journal Technology Mind and Behavior, professor Jeremy Bailenson, who’s the founding director of the Stanford Virtual Human Interaction Lab detailed several reasons why video calls can be so much more exhausting than in-person conversations, including: number one, the excessive eye contact involved in video calls. Number two, the unnatural situation of seeing ourselves on screen while we’re doing a video call and number three, having to stay in the same fixed spot during the call.

Dan Gingiss (30:34):
And I don’t know if this is the same study or not Joey, but I was listening to NPR today. And I heard about a study that also said that one of the after effects of spending so much time on video conferencing is that it is causing people to get too tired while they’re driving afterwards. And it’s causing so much fatigue that the people are now advising that if you’ve spent a lot of time in video conferencing, that you take a break, that you get your blood pumping before you get behind the wheel of a car.

Joey Coleman (31:07):
Oh wow. This looks like those “do not operate heavy machinery” warning signs, right?

Dan Gingiss (31:12):
Yeah. It’s, it’s really, really interesting. So this research also noted that because we have to put in more effort to make an interpret nonverbal communications video calls are more tiring. I think this might be the same research because that’s what this NPR story said as well. So Professor Bailenson said, quote, “[i]f you want to show someone that you’re agreeing with them, you have to do an exaggerated nod or put your thumb up. That adds cognitive load as you’re using mental calories in order to communicate” unquote. In fact, a key mistake that companies made when setting up work from home conditions last year was to treat zoom calls as the equivalent of face to face meetings, without considering that additional mental burden placed on workers and the downtime need to process what was said between the calls.

Joey Coleman (31:59):
So true, Dan, you know, at the end of the day, I’m not anti-video call. And I don’t think this article in this research is either what I do think we need to consider is giving ourselves and our colleagues and our co-workers permission not to do video calls, permission, to take more breaks, permission to set up Zoom-free days where we do no Zoom calls. I would argue that we should also have meeting free days where we have no meetings whatsoever so that we can have more time to actually be productive and get work done. And I’ll tell you one little tip in closing that I found has been incredibly effective. When somebody wants to set a schedule, a call, I’ve actually been starting to suggest that we do a walking call and the way the walk-in call works is instead of doing Zoom, why don’t we call each other on our cell phones and agree to walk around the block? It’s the socially distanced, you know, pandemic acceptable way to get a little exercise, to break some of that Zoom fatigue and to address that kind of pandemic video weight that we’ve all been experiencing. So as the pandemic begins to ebb, as we think about getting back to our offices, as we think about more in-person meetings, I encourage you to manage your own schedule and your habits more and make sure that you’re not causing your own fatigue.

Joey Coleman (33:20):
Thanks for joining us for another episode of Experience This! You are the best listener ever!

Dan Gingiss (33:31):
And since you listened to the whole show…

Joey Coleman (33:33):
Yay you!

Dan Gingiss (33:35):
We’re curious… Was there a specific part of this episode that you enjoyed the most? If so, it would mean the world to us if you could share it with a coworker, a friend, or someone that just loves listening to podcasts,

Joey Coleman (33:46):
And while you’re in the sharing mood, if you felt inclined to jump over to iTunes – or wherever you find your podcasts – and write us a review, we would so appreciate it. And when you do, don’t forget to let us know as we might have a little surprise for you.

Dan Gingiss (34:00):
Thanks again for your time and we’ll see you next week for more.

Joey Coleman (34:04):
Experience!

Dan Gingiss (34:05):
This!

Episode 127 – Secret Messages Create Special Connections

Join us as we discuss a secret message for an interstellar audience, making products that consumers actually want, and warning customers about bad things before they even realize it.

Code Breaking, Custom Creating, and Fraud Alerting – Oh My!

Referenced in the Show

• “NASA Sent a Secret Message to Mars. Meet the People Who Decoded It.” – by Kenneth Chang in the New York Times

• Pinduoduo’s Consumer-To-Manufacturer (C2M) Offerings

• American Express

Host Contact Information

Email Dan: Dan@dangingiss.com

Tweet Dan Gingiss: @DGingiss

Email Joey: JoeyC@JoeyColeman.com

DanGingiss.com

JoeyColeman.com

Subscribe to Experience This on Apple Podcasts

Learn more about our Season 7 Partner – Solvvy – The NextGen Chatbot

Episode Transcript

Download an unedited transcript of Episode 127 here or read it below:

Joey Coleman (00:05):
Welcome to Experience This!

Dan Gingiss (00:07):
The podcast that celebrates remarkable customer experiences and inspires you to stand out from the competition by wowing your customers.

Joey Coleman (00:17):
Each episode, we bring you a healthy dose of inspiring stories, funny interactions, and practical takeaways. Marketing and customer experience thought leader, Dan Gingiss…

Dan Gingiss (00:30):
shares the mic with customer retention and employee experience expert, Joey Coleman, helping you to get people talking about your business.

Joey Coleman (00:40):
So get ready because it’s time to Experience This!

Joey Coleman (00:49):
Get ready, for another episode of the Experience This! Show!

Dan Gingiss (00:54):
Join us as we discuss: a secret message for an interstellar audience, making products that consumers actually want, and warning customers about bad things before they even realize it.

Joey Coleman (01:09):
Code Breaking, Custom Creating, and Fraud Alerting – Oh my!

Joey Coleman (01:18):
There are so many great customer experience articles to read, but who has the time?! We summarize them and offer clear takeaways you can implement starting tomorrow. Enjoy this segment of CX Press, where we read the articles, so you don’t need to!

Joey Coleman (01:36):
Happy belated Easter, everyone.

Dan Gingiss (01:38):
And may none of you run into me in the store getting half off chocolate eggs.

Joey Coleman (01:46):
I love it. I did not know you had a chocolate egg addiction. That’s something new learned here in season seven of the Experience This Show!

Dan Gingiss (01:53):
Well, you know, I try to make sure that I don’t tell you everything about me, Joey – so you’re always learning.

Joey Coleman (01:59):
I like it. I like it. Well, given that it is the Easter season, I thought we could talk in today’s segment about Easter eggs.

Dan Gingiss (02:08):
Well, I think we might be hard pressed or hard-boiled pressed to do a whole segment on Easter eggs.

Joey Coleman (02:15):
Oh my goodness. Oh my goodness. Well, I agree, Dan, if we were talking about hard boiling eggs and dieing them different colors, yes. But what I’m talking about is the concept of Easter eggs that comes from video games and in that context, an Easter egg is a phrase that’s used to describe a message or an image or a feature that’s hidden in a video game of film or other usually electronic medium. Now, interestingly enough, this term was first used way back in 1979 by Steven Wright, who was then the director of software development in the Atari Consumer Division, to describe a hidden message in an Atari video game. But this concept of an Easter egg recently made international headlines again, based on something happened on Mars.

Dan Gingiss (03:01):
Wait, so now we’re talking about Easter eggs and Martians?!

Joey Coleman (03:04):
Exactly! Today’s CX Press story comes to us from an article by Kenneth Chang in the New York Times, titled “NASA Sent a Secret Message to Mars. Meet the People Who Decoded It.” Now a few weeks ago, NASA’s Perseverance Rover fell through the Martian atmosphere and while it was descending, a video camera on the spacecraft captured the deployment of the rover’s parachute. The parachute was decorated with splotches of a reddish orange and white. And during the subsequent news conference, Alan Chen, the engineer in charge of the landing system noted that his team hoped to inspire others. And I quote, “[S]ometimes we leave messages in our work for others defined for that purpose. So we invite you all to give it a shot and show your work.” Now this sparked Codebreakers around the world to take a closer look at the seemingly random pattern of perseverance is parachute trading insights on Twitter and informs on Reddit. A number of people eventually figured out the message.

Dan Gingiss (04:07):
What, what did it say?

Joey Coleman (04:08):
Well before I share what it said, Dan, I think it’s important to share how all of this came to be. Dr. Ian Clark works for NASA and was in charge of developing the Perseverance parachute.

Dan Gingiss (04:21):
Say that 10 times fast!

Joey Coleman (04:23):
Right? I’m pretty proud that I’ve said it twice in this segment without stumbling. Well, anyways, it turns out NASA is previous Rover called Curiosity used a similar parachute system when it landed on Mars back in 2012, but a failure of a prototype parachute for future missions left the engineers wanting to improve on the design. And while watching video of testing of one of the new parachutes for perseverance, Dr. Clark noticed that the checkerboard pattern of the canopy made it difficult to track how individual portions of the parachute, unfurled and inflated and he realized that a more visually distinct pattern would help them assess things more accurately while providing an opportunity to quote, “have a little fun with it.” So he asked the deputy project manager for the mission for permission to be creative and have some fun. And thankfully his manager said, “okay, just make sure it’s appropriate and couldn’t be misinterpreted.”

Dan Gingiss (05:23):
Okay, obviously guys, Joey’s going to hold out on this. What did it say question for a little bit longer, but I do think that what I’m supposed to jump in and say here is man, wouldn’t it be great if we all worked at companies where we were allowed to be creative and have some fun, because that brings out the passion in people that brings out a better work atmosphere. We love talking about how employee experience can affect the customer experience. And so I already liked this story because they’re like working on some really like serious, expensive stuff here. And yet they’re allowed to have fun and be creative.

Joey Coleman (05:58):
Dan, I couldn’t agree more. It’s that balance between doing important work, but having a good time while you’re doing it well, as it turns out, I want to reveal here what it actually said. The code on the parachute was binary. Now this is something that’s very familiar to. Computer engineers, it’s zeros and ones. There were 320 pieces of fabric with each orange section of the parachute referenced a number one and each white section referencing the number zero. And when the code was translated, it left an inspiring message on the inner rings of the parachute: Dare Mighty Things.

Dan Gingiss (06:34):
Dare Mighty things. I have to tell you if I were going to guess that I wouldn’t have guessed it, but it is pretty awesome.

Joey Coleman (06:44):
It’s pretty cool. When you think about it. And interestingly enough, there’s a little more background to this message. Dare Mighty Things” is a credo that’s often used at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in California and it comes from a speech that Teddy Roosevelt gave years ago. And I quote, “[F]ar better it is to dare mighty things, to win glorious triumphs, even though checkered by failure than to take rank with those poor spirits who neither enjoy much nor suffer much because they live in a gray twilight that knows not victory nor defeat.”

Dan Gingiss (07:18):
Well, may we never have to take rank with poor spirits again is what I say.

Joey Coleman (07:24):
Not to mention, this is a presidential speech. Are you moved?! We just, we don’t have presidential rhetoric like that, but I digress.

Dan Gingiss (07:30):
No, that’s true. That’s definitely true. So I’m wondering how long did this actually take for people to decipher the parachute code?

Joey Coleman (07:40):
Well, it actually only took about two hours, which to me seemed pretty fast. You know, I know about another hidden code. That’s on a sculpture inside CIA headquarters at Langley, Virginia, that code breakers have been working on since 1990, when the sculpture was revealed and they’ve only decoded three of the four parts over the last 30 years. But what’s interesting is the parachute code wasn’t the only hidden element in the Perseverance Rover.

Dan Gingiss (08:11):
Ah ha! No it wasn’t. And I particularly enjoyed the series of drawings that represented the five rovers. NASA has sent to Mars from the small soldier in 1997 to perseverance. Now it looks like one of those family car stickers you may have seen with the stick figures of parents and kids and maybe a pet on it. The Mars Rover version has stick figures of the various rovers in a kind of family car sticker design. There are also three small chips with the names of 10.9 million people stencilled on them. Part of NASA efforts for the public to participate in its robotic missions. Interestingly enough, the project manager we mentioned earlier, Matt Wallace, who gave the okay to do something fun with the parachute? He recently shared that there are more Surprises to come saying, quote, there’s some things on the front of the vehicle that we’ll have a chance to see once we deploy the robot arm. So who knows how many more surprises we’re in for?!

Joey Coleman (09:09):
I love every piece of this story. Dan. I love the playfulness. I love the creativity. I love the hidden messages. And the reason I wanted to talk about this on the show today is because so many businesses miss the opportunity to embed Easter eggs in the interactions that they have with their customers, whether you’re a product based business or a service-based business, this idea of putting little hidden messages that your customers can come across is something that I think a lot more businesses need to be paying attention to.

Dan Gingiss (09:42):
Yeah, I agree. And this doesn’t have to be very hard. We’ve talked before on the show about messages that appear on shipping boxes and sometimes they’re like underneath the flap. So you only see them when you go to take it apart to recycle it. And that doesn’t cost anything because you’re printing something on the box anyway. And so as long as you’re printing on the same side, it’s not going to cost you any more to add some, some type on there. I think there’s also places I remember a ways back and I’m sorry that my rain man abilities must be failing me. But, uh, we talked about the insurance company that, uh, that had the $10,000 reward buried in the, in the

Joey Coleman (10:23):
Terms and Conditions?

Dan Gingiss (10:26):
I mean, obviously that got them a lot of press and it was such a cool story. So I think there are plenty of places that we can do this. Wait a minute, wait a minute. It’s coming to me.

Joey Coleman (10:39):
It’s coming to you isn’t it? I’m going to guess on this one Dan, was it Season One?

Dan Gingiss (10:43):
No, that’s where I started to look too. But it’s not.

Joey Coleman (10:47):
I think it was season one, maybe not, but it was in a, it was in a “Say Anything” wasn’t it?

Dan Gingiss (10:52):
It was a, I think you should just stop guessing it was a…

Joey Coleman (10:58):
Normally I don’t play the game.

Dan Gingiss (11:00):
We don’t have a segment called “Say Anything” – that’s that’s a 1980s movie. Um, we have a segment called “Say What,” but it wasn’t that either, uh, it was in episode 73, season four, Required Remarkable, woman wins $10,000 for reading the fine print anyway, uh, enough of that shenanigans. Uh, but yeah, this is, look, there’s no law that says that your company has to be boring. It’s not written anywhere. It’s not in your credo or your value or mission statement. The lawyers don’t say that you have to be boring, and yet so many companies decide to be boring. And that’s why when I talk about, you know, my favorite word is witty in talking about how to create remarkable experiences, because witty to me, it’s not about telling jokes or being funny because humor can be dangerous. It’s just about thinking about how we use language and trying to come up with a more clever, fun, personable human way of saying something, or in this case of maybe hiding a little wink, wink that not everybody’s going to get, but man, when they get it, they’re just going to love you because they’re going to feel like they’re part of a special club.

Joey Coleman (12:07):
Absolutely. So friends, how can you apply the same level of playfulness and creativity? And one might even go so bold as to say Curiosity that the NASA team did? Well first and foremost, let your loyal fans interact with your products and services, not just use them, explore ways for them to have a relationship with your products and services that goes beyond just the typical use case, create some unscheduled or found moments of surprise and delight. I think a lot of brands think about, Oh, what are going to be our surprise and delight moments. But with Easter eggs, you can kind of bury those surprise and delight moments and your customer will find them on their own schedule and it will feel more authentic that way. It will feel more random that way. It will feel more unique that way. And last but not least, let’s just have some fun. I mean, it’s not rocket science!

Dan Gingiss (13:02):
I see what you did there Joey!

Joey Coleman (13:06):
With a pandemic sweeping the globe and shifting the way organizations interact with their customers, many of the old ways of operating just don’t work anymore. As we all navigate a COVID-19 world, it’s time to Redesign the Experience.

Joey Coleman (13:27):
Hey, Dan, let’s play a game I like to call “Name that Acronym!”

Dan Gingiss (13:33):
It’s “Name that Acronym” folks!

Joey Coleman (13:36):
Yes. Well, in the last segment we talked about NASA and so I was thinking…

Dan Gingiss (13:40):
National Aeronautics and Space Administration?

Joey Coleman (13:43):
Oh, very good. You’re ready already. I like it. I like it. Well now let’s see what other acronyms we know. And let’s maybe go with some acronyms that are a little more business oriented. All right, Dan, are you ready?

Dan Gingiss (13:56):
I am ready.

Joey Coleman (13:59):
All right. B2B?

Dan Gingiss (14:01):
Business to business.

Joey Coleman (14:03):
B2C?

Dan Gingiss (14:04):
Business to consumer.

Joey Coleman (14:05):
C2M?

Dan Gingiss (14:08):
Consumer to Marshmallow?

Joey Coleman (14:11):
I like the creativity of that, but that’s not exactly what I was going for to be honest. And this was a new one for me until very recently. It stands for consumer to manufacturer and this is a newly emerging approach to production. That’s getting a lot of attention in China, especially as we kind of navigate through the pandemic. Now there are several versions of C to M, but in essence, C to M is pairing big data. That’s gathered by a tech platform with artificial intelligence in order to identify the latest consumer shopping trends. And then with this insight manufacturers make products directly for consumers, cutting out all of the intermediaries with more direct insights about customer demand. There’s less need to create excess inventory buffers, which improves margins and reduces waste.

Dan Gingiss (15:06):
Now I’m all for getting rid of them middle man, cause they rarely add a whole lot of value. But what you’re saying here sounds like we’re listening to customers and developing products based on their use cases or what they’re saying or doing. I mean, can you give me an example of maybe a Chinese C to M business?

Joey Coleman (15:26):
I can and what I would say Dan is, yes we are. But what’s unique about C2M is these tech platforms are taking it to the next level. It’s not about the brand listening to what their customers are saying. And then creating new products, it’s giant social media platforms or e-commerce platforms tracking search behaviors and buying behaviors, extrapolating that data. And then using AI to partner with manufacturing firms to go straight to production. So you might’ve heard of the Chinese company Alibaba before.

Dan Gingiss (16:02):
Of course China’s biggest e-commerce platform.

Joey Coleman (16:06):
Exactly. So Alibaba clearly has all of the big data they need. They also have a thriving SITA em business unit. Now earlier in the pandemic, the CTM team at Alibaba noticed a sharp rise in demand for alcohol based car, cleaning supplies, things people want to use in order to stop the spread of COVID infections. Now Alibaba approached Otis, which is a company that makes car cleaning products who ironically enough at the time was really struggling with their sales. And Alibaba suggested that Otis create a line of portable sanitizing sprays instead of car cleaning products. They had all the ability to put, you know, to kind of create the, the spray bottles. If you will. They had all the ability to create the solvents that would go inside those, but they kind of suggested that based on what they were seeing in the marketplace, they should create something that was a portable sanitizing spray. So the team had Otis takes this data. It takes this suggestion and within three days rolls out a new product. Now, normally it takes them over three months to create a new product. What’s interesting is because Alibaba does so much e-commerce they had partnered customers were able to pre-order this spray before they even started manufacturing. So think of it as like Kickstarter, but without the Kickstarter platform and more than 200,000 bottles of portable sanitizing spray were sold in the first 24 hours,

Dan Gingiss (17:40):
That’s it huh? Just 200,000?

Joey Coleman (17:41):
That’s it! Just a brand new product launch with over 200,000 items sold in the first day, a brand new product that this company had never made before. Do you think that made the folks at Otis had a little bit happy? I imagine it did!

Dan Gingiss (17:54):
Especially with those struggling sales that were no longer. I mean, this is interesting. I would say I’m reminded of the fact that in the early months of the pandemic, there were many companies that started making things that they weren’t normally making because they had the supplies to do that. We talked here about some alcohol companies making hand sanitizer. We know that some car companies were making respirators and all that sort of thing. So let’s talk a little bit more about how this is similar or different.

Joey Coleman (18:24):
Well, I think you’re spot on we’ve we’ve seen other companies do that, but like let’s take example of the alcohol company that made hand sanitizer. They had to go out into the marketplace. First of all, they had to figure out how to do that. They had to create new bottles, new packaging, retool their systems internally, retrain their workers internally to create this. And then they had to go to their alcohol customers and say, Hey, I know you’re used to buying alcohol from us, but maybe you might like to buy hand sanitizer from us. It was a little bit of a leap. If not, a pretty significant leap…

Dan Gingiss (19:00):
Not as tasty for sure.

Joey Coleman (19:01):
Not as tasty a leap. And again, their marketplace that they were selling to was their existing customer base. Now counterbalance that against what Alibaba is doing. They already have everybody on the platform shopping they’re used to coming shopping. And so imagine taking an analogy here instead of the distillery selling sanitizer at their closed down, you know, custom craft brew shop or distillery locations instead, imagine walking into the mall and seeing this you’re expecting to see different types of products. So the reality is the more options that consumers have for where to shop and the more information they have at their fingertips about what to buy, the more these manufacturers are going to need to adapt to the products they’re creating.

Dan Gingiss (19:48):
Well, another example of how deeper connection with customers can lead to new products can be seen in the actions of the global spirits company Bacardi during the pandemic lockdowns Bacardi has hosted live streamed whiskey tastings on Amazon, introduced espresso martini cocktail kits for at-home mixologists, and gain the attention of single malt whiskey influencers with an Aberfeldy scotch dubbed, wait for it. The Loch Down, “loch” L-O-C-H.

Joey Coleman (20:18):
L-O-C-H as in the Scottish lake. I like it. I like it. The Loch Down. My son’s name is Lochlan – I need to put him on lockdown more often. I like this. What I love about these stories in these examples is we’re seeing a lot of companies around the world start to experiment with this, but in China, this is something that’s been going strong for a few years now. Now granted, the marketplace is different. E-commerce is different of the influence is different, but I saw a story about a company in China called Pinduoduo.

Dan Gingiss (20:53):
Time out! Now I’m going to have to interrupt you there. Best company name in the history of Experience This: Pinduoduo?

Joey Coleman (21:02):
Pinduoduo. It’s a pretty good name, right? It’s pretty fun. It’s pretty fun. Pinduoduo. I think I’m saying, hopefully I’m saying that right. The transliteration may not be spot on, but what pin duo duo did is they recognized that high-end robot vacuum cleaners kind of think like a Roomba or something like that, were selling in China for about 3000 Yuan. That’s about $500 us, which made them affordable to many of China’s richest citizens, but out of budget for a lot of their consumers. So they took this data, proving that there was a strong demand and then directly worked with the manufacturer to produce a much cheaper version. And then they shared their after sales data in order to help the manufacturer improve the product. Now, again, what I think is fascinating about this is these are the platforms taking a lead on this behavior. This is not the existing brands, the existing companies. These are the platforms, figuring out a way to use all of this data and all this insight they have by combining the data with AI, to then turn around and develop direct relationships to the manufacturers that they can then loop back around and have a direct relationship back to the consumer.

Dan Gingiss (22:22):
So you’re kind of saying, this is like if Facebook decided to sell staplers?

Joey Coleman (22:27):
Exactly. If they realized that everybody was posting about staplers and everybody was talking about staplers. I mean, it’s a variation on a theme on what Amazon does with Amazon Basics, where Amazon looks and sees which products are selling the best. But this is actually doing a little more of a sophisticated kind of sentiment analysis for some social media platforms and things like that, where they’re actually tracking the trends and the interest level. And then pairing that in. And what I also like, which Pinduoduo is doing is this loop that comes back in after the sale. Because right now a company that let’s say manufacturers, a product they’ve got to have the, as you talk about all the time, Dan, their customer experience listening going on, and they’re kind of listening to voice of the customer and they’re doing surveys, and they’re trying to see what’s being said about their brand on social, but this to me is an entirely different level of the platform providing that data back to the manufacturer. It just seems like a really fast moving change of how it’s going. And while this is certainly popular in China, we haven’t seen it as much in Europe and in the United States yet, but I think it’s just a matter of time.

Dan Gingiss (23:38):
Well, and it is always great to look at other countries to see what’s hot and what’s going on because trends often cross the globe. And we’ve talked about that before with VR (virtual reality) and how I had seen some of it in Japan years ago before I ever saw it in the United States. So I think it’s worthy to look at this and I do think it’s very interesting that almost any company, essentially, if it has an audience and data can work with a manufacturer to become a product creator. And I think that’s the takeaway is that no matter what business you’re in, it doesn’t mean that you have to expand only to ancillary businesses that are related to what you do today, that there might be something out there that using the data that you have, you can come up with something that is not so expected from your company.

Joey Coleman (24:33):
Dan, I totally agree. I think the reality is if we fast forward out, certainly 10 years, maybe five years, every product business should also have a service component to it. And every service business should also have a product component to it. And where I see this convergence with big data, I was listening to a presentation the other day from Peter Diamandis who is the author of the book, Abundance and the book, Bold. He’s also the founder of the X prize. And Peter said there are going to be two types of businesses at the end of this decade, businesses that are AI powered and businesses that are bankrupt. And so I think at the end of the day, the reason we wanted to share this segment is how are you thinking about incorporating AI into your business today? Because I promise you, your competitors are already thinking about this and many of them are already starting to do it.

Joey Coleman (25:33):
Almost everyone has interacted with chatbots, but all too often, it’s been a bad experience. In MythBusters, presented by Solvvy, we explore a common myth about CX chatbots and see how the right technology can create a positive experience, every time.

Joey Coleman (25:57):
It’s myth about chatbots, chatbots have bad analytics and lack insights. You probably think of chatbots as a customer communication tool and rightfully so, and as customer obsessed leaders know there is gold to be mined from customer interactions. Unfortunately, when it comes to capturing analytics and servicing actionable customer insights, most legacy chatbots fall woefully short.

Dan Gingiss (26:25):
Interestingly enough, the past is not the future. The best next gen chatbots include analytics and provide valuable insights into your customers and your support operations. For example, an X gen chat bot includes dashboards that do a lot of the heavy lifting for your team in seconds can see the types and frequency of questions that are being asked by customers and how the volumes are trending over time. You can also see how often your chat bot is successful in resolving different types of questions.

Joey Coleman (26:54):
Now, how does this help? Well, as a support leader the chat bot actually helps you identify customer pain points and prioritize the most impactful customer issues. First, furthermore, next gen chatbots, make it simple to drill down into specific conversations, to get more details about why an issue is occurring. This helps you better determine how to address the issue, whether that’s making changes to your help content or working with product and design teams to make fundamental improvements in your offerings.

Dan Gingiss (27:26):
Like using data and feedback to make improvements to a new lower end robot vacuum cleaner in China?

Joey Coleman (27:31):
Exactly. And that’s another Myth Busted, thanks to our friends and podcast supporters at Solvvy – the Next Gen Chatbot.

Joey Coleman (27:40):
We love telling stories and sharing key insights you can implement, or avoid, based on our experiences. Can you believe that This Just Happened?

Joey Coleman (27:56):
I got an interesting little text message the other day, Dan, that I wanted to tell you about… I’m on a call and a text message comes across my phone that says the following: “AMEX Fraud Alert. Did you just attempt a $15 and 23 cent charge on your card? Ending two, three, one, one, one at tropical smoothie cafe reply one, if yes, two to call Amex.” Now this was a little surprising to me. So I finished the call and I checked in with my amazing wife. And the reason I checked in with my wife is because ironically enough, tropical smoothie cafe is a place that we like to order from, from time to time. And I thought that maybe my credit card had been saved on her account or something. And she had placed an order while I was on the phone.

Dan Gingiss (28:42):
And then I assume the next question would be, why didn’t you bring me one?

Joey Coleman (28:46):
But I did look at the amount and I was like, “Oh, this might mean she ordered one for me too.” But we also have two boys and I’m looking at it going, there’s no way we got four smoothies for $15. So this is not seeming to be the right setup. Long story short, she had not placed the order. So what did I do? I texted to back to the thread, I then got a reply that said, please call 1-800, it gave me a long number or the number on the back of your card. Now, as I mentioned, Dan, I was kind of going about my work day when this happened. And while I was concerned about this potential fraud, I was kind of in the middle of juggling, a lot of other things. And so as I was trying to kind of piece a few things together and kind of wrap up a couple other things, so I could make this call, my phone rang and it was the number that I have saved in my phone from Amex. So when I didn’t call within like 15 minutes of texting, they called me. Long story short. We have a long conversation. They say, is there any chance you used your card in Dallas, Texas this morning? I said, no, I did not travel to Dallas just to get Tropical Smoothie, although don’t get me wrong. I would go a long distance to get a Bahama Mama, Tropical Smoothie, moral of the story I did not. And they said, I’m guessing you might not have made these other charges. And lo and behold, someone had put my card information onto a card and they were going all around in Dallas, wiping it, trying to make lots of purchases.

Dan Gingiss (30:14):
You know, I hate when that happens, and coming from the credit card industry, it is a fascinating business, this fraud business, because it is very difficult to siphon out. The fraudsters are not always obvious in their actions. I remember for example, when I was down in Columbia, I was able to run my card at a Colombian coffee shop. But as soon as I spent $20 on some cufflinks at a jewelry store that got declined because basically the combination of jewelry store plus Columbia sent it.

Joey Coleman (30:51):
They were not liking it.

Dan Gingiss (30:53):
No – they didn’t like that. And, uh, but it’s really interesting because that happened to be a false positive or false negative. I don’t know whatever, but it wasn’t,

Joey Coleman (31:00):
You just wanted the cufflinks!

Dan Gingiss (31:04):
But you know, this reminds me also, I had a similar situation recently with another credit card company where I got a fraud alert and it turns out that somebody had set up an account at FedEx in Memphis and was shipping lots of packages using my card. And this was.

Joey Coleman (31:24):
Sorry about that Dan!

Dan Gingiss (31:26):
So this was pretty ingenious because since they had set up the account, it was basically like a recurring payment. And so the credit card company did what they should have, which is they shut down the card and they issued me another card. But a week later I got another fraud alert from FedEx in Memphis. And I’m like, wait a second. But you just changed my number.

Joey Coleman (31:47):
You already disabled this!

Dan Gingiss (31:47):
Yeah, and I just updated like 79 websites with my new number and all that sort of stuff. And so I called a guy and this is where you’re working at a credit card company has some advantages because I said, you know, I think what’s going on here is this is a recurring payment, which means, uh, one of the things that credit card companies have done to help consumers is that if you have fraud on your card and you need a new number, they’ll call, you know, they’ll tell your, your cable company, And your utilities and all that so that you don’t have to go change the number, they do that for you. Well, the problem is when somebody is fraudulent lately signing up for a recurring payment, then they also tell that person…

Joey Coleman (32:29):
FedEx, Hey, guess what? Don’t worry about it. Let the charges roll.

Dan Gingiss (32:32):
Exactly. So I got a third card and that card then had fraud on it. So when I went to the fourth card in less than a month, and I said, look, I’m kind of done with this. I said to them, I know what’s wrong. Please shut off the recurring payment and then issue me a new card. And they did. And it worked now the moral of the story there is you shouldn’t have to work at a credit card company to be able to explain to the credit card company what they need to do to stop this. Uh, but I think where you were going was this texting alert thing is pretty cool. It’s in real time, it’s a great way to very quickly, either verify or deny a charge. I’ve had it happen where I’ve been in a store it’s been declined. And the second after the cashier says, your card is declined. I get the text, I hit. Yes. And then the card goes through and I always feel good about that because it means the credit card company is looking out for me versus feeling embarrassed that my card got declined, but I don’t know maybe others don’t.

Joey Coleman (33:32):
No, I think you’re spot on Dan. And that’s the main reason I wanted to talk about this is the power that comes from anticipating customer headaches. To your point about the FedEx story. No customer has to, wants to, have to call back again and again and again, when something is going wrong, right? Fraud on your credit card is not the usual thing you like to see. It’s a problem. And you start to get worked up about it. You want to solve the problem. They want to solve the problem, et cetera. But what I love about what American Express did here is they anticipated the problem and made me feel like they were doing me a favor by checking in. The reality is in most jurisdictions, there are very specific laws about how much liability you can get when a credit card is fraudulently used. And in most places, it’s usually about $50. You probably know the specific numbers in the specific jurisdictions, but on average, it’s about $50. So the reality is checking in on these fraud charges helps the credit card company more than it helps me. Because my liability is capped at $50. They have to pay all the rest. If these charges get run up in a significant way multiple times, but this idea of making it feel like they’re looking out for me or anticipating my problem makes me feel like they’re doing me a favor when the reality is, they’re kind of doing themselves a favor. So what can we learn from this story? I think where possible we want to be looking at what are the potential headaches that a customer has from using our product naturally? It’s natural that I would go to tropical smoothie and swipe my credit card and use it. So what are the consequences of that potentially while someone might get my credit card and use it fraudulently, what can they do anticipate the problem that I’m going to have and jump ahead to solve it. So how much of your time, fellow listeners of the Experience This Show, are you spending anticipating the problems that your customers might have in order to deliver a remarkable experience and remove that problem before they’re even aware of it?

Joey Coleman (35:43):
Thanks for joining us for another episode of Experience This! You are the best listener ever!

Dan Gingiss (35:54):
And since you listened to the whole show,

Joey Coleman (35:56):
Yay you!

Dan Gingiss (35:57):
We’re curious – was there a specific part of this episode that you enjoyed the most? If so, it would mean the world to us if you could share it with a coworker, a friend, or someone that just loves listening to podcasts.

Joey Coleman (36:08):
And while you’re in the sharing mood, if you felt inclined to jump over to iTunes, or wherever you find your podcasts and write us a review, we would so appreciate it. And when you do, don’t forget to let us know as we might have a little surprise for you.

Dan Gingiss (36:23):
Thanks again for your time and we’ll see you next week for more

Joey Coleman (36:26):
Experience!

Dan Gingiss (36:28):
This!

Episode 120 – Zero In on Small, Personalized Touches

Join us as we discuss a portrait of your pet, zeroing in on customer centricity, and how “mini” — and even “no” — have become big..

Painting, Disrupting, and Adapting – Oh My!

Host Contact Information

Email Dan: Dan@dangingiss.com

Tweet Dan Gingiss: @DGingiss

Email Joey: JoeyC@JoeyColeman.com

DanGingiss.com

JoeyColeman.com

Subscribe to Experience This on Apple Podcasts

Learn more about our Season 7 Partner – Solvvy – The NextGen Chatbot

Episode Transcript

Download an unedited transcript of Episode 120 here or read it below:

Joey Coleman (00:05):
Welcome to Experience This!

Dan Gingiss (00:08):
The podcast that celebrates remarkable customer experiences and inspires you to stand out from the competition by wowing your customers.

Joey Coleman (00:17):
Each episode, we bring you a healthy dose of inspiring stories, funny interactions, and practical takeaways. Marketing and customer experience thought leader, Dan Gingiss…

Dan Gingiss (00:30):
shares the mic with customer retention and employee experience expert Joey Coleman, helping you to get people talking about your business.

Joey Coleman (00:40):
So get, ready because it’s time to Experience This!

Dan Gingiss (00:48):
Get ready, for another episode of the Experience This Show!

Joey Coleman (00:54):
Join us as we discuss: a portrait of your pet, zeroing in on customer centricity, and how “mini” and even “no” have become big.

Dan Gingiss (01:07):
Painting, Disrupting and Adapting – Oh my!

Joey Coleman (01:15):
There are so many great customer experience articles to read, but who has the time?! We summarize them and offer clear takeaways you can implement starting tomorrow. Enjoy this segment of CX Press – where we read the articles, so you don’t need to!

Dan Gingiss (01:33):
This week’s CX Press comes to us from one of my local newspapers, the Chicago Sun Times, and it’s entitled, “Cezanne or Chewy?” Now we’ve talked about Chewy, the online pet supplies retailer in two previous episodes – Episode 17 where we shared some customer stories, and Episode 50 where we talked about what I called “the greatest customer service email in the history of customer service or email.” Now they’ve achieved the trifecta!

Joey Coleman (02:06):
Has anybody else even come close to the trifecta Dan? I don’t think so. Like I know we’ve talked about Amazon and Apple. We’ve talked about lots of great brand experiences, but I don’t think anybody – but Chewy – has done three separate segments totally on their business.

Dan Gingiss (02:21):
I think it is possible this is a first… I’d have to go back and look in the archives.

Joey Coleman (02:25):
Woo! I’m feeling excited. This is, this is groundbreaking stuff here.

Dan Gingiss (02:28):
Well, Chewy was in the news again just after New Year’s with this story. And I know you’re a pretty big art fan, Joey, but can you even imagine how a famed artist like Paul Cezanne gets compared to a pet supplies company?

Joey Coleman (02:43):
I can not. I can not. I, as you know, am definitely familiar with Cezanne’s work and am a fan of Cezanne’s work, but Cezanne plus Chewy? I’m confused.

Dan Gingiss (02:52):
Well, it turns out that Chewy sends out more than a thousand hand-painted portraits of its’ customers pets every week… just as a surprise to say, thank you. Now, not surprisingly, the pictures have become social media gold. As many of the lucky recipients post them online for their friends and followers to fawn over. And one customer even told the Sun Times, quote, “I just want to buy everything from them. They’re a big company. I was shocked that they did something so personal.”

Joey Coleman (03:25):
Oh, I love it. I love this story. I love this behavior by Chewy. I love the personalization. But most importantly, I want to go back to that quote from the article. “I just want to buy everything from them. They’re a big company. I was shocked they did something so personal.” There’s two pieces of this puzzle friends: if you create remarkable customer experiences, your customers will want to do business with you again, and again, and again, and again. And the bigger you are, the less they expect something personal. Or if you’re in an industry that is not notoriously known for personal interactions and you do something personal, it is going to shock and all them, this is definitely, you know, while I get that, not everybody who’s listening is going to start sending, you know, hand painted portraits of their customers’ pets to them, there is a variation on this theme in every listener’s business.

Dan Gingiss (04:25):
Well, and I would go so far as to say that being big is not an excuse for not trying this.

Joey Coleman (04:31):
Totally! Totally!

Dan Gingiss (04:33):
And so look, they don’t send it to every customer and that’s okay. They’re sending it to a lot of customers, but just because they’re big doesn’t mean that they can’t make something like this happen, and operationalize it, and scale it. Now, they’re a little bit secretive about how they select which pets they feature. You can’t purchase the portraits – even if you ask really nicely to customer service, they’ll say no. The article says that Chewy works with hundreds of artists around the country who create them based on customer photographs. So obviously there’s some process in which customers have to send or upload a photograph of their pet,

Joey Coleman (05:09):
But this is also a great way by the way, to, you know, give back for them too, for lack of a better way of putting it for chewy to support some local artists as well. I mean, hundreds of local artists, it sounds like.

Dan Gingiss (05:21):
Absolutely for sure. And one of the most interesting parts for me of this article was there was a big discussion about how well chewy is doing as a company. And let me just give you some stats. The company has become the number two in the pet supplies industry with a 34% market share. Now, Amazon is first at 50% – and it’s benefited from two different pandemic trends. The first is that people are staying home and not venturing out to big box retailers and people are adopting new pets at a record pace. In fact, Chewy added 5 million new customers in 2020 and its stock price tripled. So anybody that asks you does customer experience pay off? Is there an ROI to customer experience? Here’s perhaps the only company that we featured on three different segments on a customer experience show and look at how well their business is doing. So this stuff works now, is it cheap? No – they’re paying artists, they’re shipping out these portraits. It’s some money. There’s no question they’re investing in this, but look, what happens. These customers get the portraits. They feel so great about chewy. They want to go share it with their friends and followers on social media, which of course is basically doing Chewy’s marketing for the company, right? So this is marketing dollars that is much better spent in my opinion than buying a Facebook ad or sending out yet another email campaign.

Joey Coleman (06:58):
Absolutely. And Dan, I guarantee that the folks at Chewy that are responsible for coordinating these paintings are having fun to. Talk about a fantastically unexpected moment of surprise and delight for the customer… But I would imagine, you know, getting the art back from the artist and seeing the paintings and seeing the photographs of those and knowing when the customer receives them, how happy they’re going to be. And then seeing the posts on social media, this kind of gets back into that whole thing we talked about in our last episode, this idea of your culture being part of the customer experience. They create better experiences for the customers, which by default create better experiences for the employees, and these things have a tendency to feed in a fulfilling.

Dan Gingiss (07:43):
And another thing I would add here is I know some listeners are saying, okay, that’s great, but Julia is a pet supplies company. So of course they’re going to do portraits of their pets. But I think almost every company has an opportunity to do something personalized for their customers. So let’s say that you’re a B2B software company, right? Couldn’t be any farther away from a retail pet supplies company. But you know, what’s been happening over the last year. You’ve been on more zoom calls with people and you know, what’s been happening during those zoom calls. People’s pets come into the picture, their dogs, their cats, they’re all over the place. So you actually know that your clients have pets. Now, you don’t have to send them a portrait, but can you imagine what would happen if one of your clients received a bag of treats in the mail from you for their pet, the way that people think about their pets as family members that is going to go a really long way with people. We also know a lot more about people’s kids and spouses and everybody else has been running over and running through the picture in the last year. And I think that’s a good thing because it adds a level of familiarity between people that wasn’t there before, even between colleagues at the same company that wasn’t there before. And I think that we can leverage this as businesses because the more that we know about people, the better we can connect with them. I just had a call the other day with somebody where I was doing sort of them the favor, right. They called on me for some advice and help, and I met with him for half an hour. And the next thing I knew, I got a package in the mail from Amazon and it was a t-shirt that had a pinball machine on it that said “Pinball Wizard!

Joey Coleman (09:22):
Oh, nice. Right to Dan’s heart ladies and gentlemen.

Dan Gingiss (09:25):
He knew that that’s something that I loved. We didn’t even talk about pinball!

Joey Coleman (09:28):
Chicago Cubs, pinball wizard, pinball games, board games, and I don’t know… imperfect produce! Those are like four high listing, uh, loves of Dan Gingiss, ladies and gentlemen.

Dan Gingiss (09:42):
And what I thought was great was that we didn’t even talk about it. You know, he saw that somewhere online. He learned that about me, it’s in one of my bios or whatever. And man, I mean, how much better is that than just sending something random or not sending anything at all.

Joey Coleman (09:57):
Or sending something with your logo on it. I mean, at the end of the day, friends, this far into the pandemic, if you aren’t creating personal connections with the people that you are literally seeing into their homes, again, whether that’s your clients, your customers, your colleagues, your coworkers, you’re missing a huge opportunity. And if you don’t want to go so far as to order them a gift or a present, what about just asking them a question, being on the Zoom call with them and saying, Hey, that looks like a really interesting piece of art behind you. What is that? Or where did you get that? Or, Hey, is that a photograph I see on your desk? Who’s in the photograph or was that a streaker that just ran by? Oh, that was your three-year-old. Oh, well, do we need to end the call? You know, there’s any number of ways that we can engage in a personal way to bring a little more humanity back to our discussions. You know, one of the things I’ve been spending a lot of time thinking about over the course of the last year and is going to be a subject of a future book is this idea that we talk about customer experience and we talk about employee experience, but at the end of the day, isn’t it really all just human experience. And the more we lean into the human experience, I think the better interactions, the better reactions, the better situations, the better scenarios we’ll be able to create, not only for the people we interact with, but for ourselves as well.

Joey Coleman (11:25):
We’re excited to give you an overview of an important book you should know about – as well as share some of our favorite passages – as part of our next Book Report.

Dan Gingiss (11:41):
Today’s book report is “The Zero In Formula: The Definitive Guide to Building a Disruptive and Sustainable Business Through Customer Centric Innovation” by author Dennis Geelen. The book is brand new, just released in 2021, and starts with an important question: can a business be disruption proof? A pandemic reveals the answers. There are also lots of case studies, including from Coca Cola, Goodwill, and Kodak. And it also contains a self-assessment tool that helps companies rate their effectiveness when it comes to customer centric and innovative strategies, tools, and practices. Now, as always, we ask the authors to summarize the book for us. So here’s Dennis Geelen describing the Zero In Formula, in his own words:

Dennis Geelen (12:31):
The Zero In Formula was written specifically for business owners and leaders. Whether you’re looking to start a new company or you’ve been in business for several years, I believe that all organizations larger, small in all industries face two major challenges that eventually decide their longterm fate. And that’s the problem of indifference. So why is that two challenges? Because the indifference can either be external. Your customers are internal, your team members. You end up with indifferent customers when there’s no compelling reason to purchase your product or service, rather than your competitors. Internally, many businesses end up with indifferent employees who are complacent because they’re just not passionate about coming to work each day, the company has no compelling purpose or direction, or the culture is either too rigid or too stale. The Zero In Formula is a guidebook to help leaders win the battle against indifference by laying out a framework for a customer centric and innovative company. When your business is truly customer centric, you are intentional about having proper strategies and tools in place to know your customers and building your company around, serving them and giving them the ultimate customer experience. An innovative organization is one where new ideas for products and services and experiences and processes that better serve your customers, don’t happen by accident. Innovative companies understand the principles and practices required to cultivate a culture of collaborative teamwork, focused on finding new and better ways of doing things. The book is full of tools, templates, and strategies that any leader can apply to their own business or team. And it’s chocked full of examples and stories from businesses and leaders around the globe. That’s going to help the reader relate and resonate. My consulting practice is called Zero In, and this book and feels the formula that I use when working with my business clients, allowing you to harness these proven tactics in your company, to become a customer centric and innovative as possible and set your business up for longterm success.

Joey Coleman (14:37):
I think the call-out about indifference emerging from both external and internal forces is spot on. We know that happy employees equal happy customers, but the word indifference is so powerful because that’s when people decide to leave a company when they don’t care. You know, it’s interesting. I remember in school being asked the question like in junior high, what is the opposite of love? And a lot of kids in the class thought, and myself included at first, the opposite of love was hate. When the reality is the opposite of love is indifference. It’s that you actually don’t care at all. And I think that is so true and so often people are, you know, worried about who the haters are, is our friend Jay Baer would say, when the reality is we need to pay more attention to things we’re doing that are creating moments of indifference. You know, on every book report, we love having the author pick their favorite passage as well. And so enjoy while Dennis reads his favorite section from the book:

Dennis Geelen (15:43):
The story of Greg Meade, Chris Mead, Mike Del Papa, and their company CrossNet is one of just over 627,000 new businesses starting up in the U S each year. New technologies, new ways of communicating, connecting, and selling means more products, more services, and more business models to meet newfound needs. It’s easier now to start up a business than in any era in the past, the internet provides access to the tools and resources. You need to understand how to start a business at your fingertips. If capital is required, there’s venture capitalists and angel investors looking to help finance the next big business idea. Stats for the U.S. show that there are over 30 million small businesses in the country alone making up 99.9% of all U.S. businesses. Starting a company is easy, but just starting is not the goal studies show. 20% of new businesses fail during the first two years, 45% fail in the first five years and 65% in the first 10 years, only 25% of businesses survive 15 years or more. Why? What mistakes are businesses making? If there’s more demands, if it’s easier to market and sell to people around the world. And if the, if you have the information and resources required to start a business, what’s the problem? To put it simply, with more businesses, there’s more competition. Will CrossNet be a long-term successful game, product and company, for sure, off to a terrific start, but many opportunities and challenges lie ahead for the young entrepreneurs. How will they face those challenges? Time will be the ultimate judge, but as you will see in this chapter, CrossNet has a big leg up on other businesses by deciding to build theirs on a proper foundation, you know,

Dan Gingiss (17:35):
Like to share my favorite passage from the book as well, and then give Joey a chance to do so. For me, it was a setup in the introduction that called out two reasons why so many companies fail and here they are: “(1) they lose sight of the purpose behind why they started after some success. The focus turns to maximizing quarterly revenues, finding efficiencies for standardizing their processes. There are no longer the customer centric and innovative company that they were in the beginning. (2) They’re not flexible and adaptable to handle major challenges that come their way and economic downturn, a new player in the industry, a change in customer habits will disrupt their business model. They’re too rigid or stubborn to adapt and customers end up leaving.

Joey Coleman (18:31):
Oh, if there’s anything that the last year has taught, hopefully every business on the planet, is the importance of adaptability friends. I can’t imagine that your business today has the exact same service offerings and exact same product offerings, delivered in the same way that it did a year ago. And it’s so funny because pre-pandemic, I think this concept of adapting was something that was, you know, regularly thrown around. Well, either adapter become extinct. And, you know, it was kind of a trope that was used in a lot of different business books and business discussions. But I think every business has had to do that and has realized that we probably weren’t as flexible as we had believed that we were. My favorite quote is as follows: “If after collecting data surveying and talking to your customers, you are still not able to understand the emotions they feel and subsequently empathize with them, I highly suggest you put yourself in their shoes. There’s credence to the old saying, “do not judge a man until you walk a mile in his shoes” and “do unto others, as you would have them do onto you.” Ultimately, if you are able to know exactly what your customers are feeling that caused them to want, or need your products or services, how it makes them feel when your product or services provide the value they need, how it feels when your products or services do not provide the value they require, then you are now set up to do something about it and serve them the way you would want to be served the best way to understand how your customers feel is to experience and feel the same things yourself.

Dan Gingiss (20:16):
You know, I’m so glad you selected that passage, Joey, because I’m often asked what’s one tip that you can give to companies if they need to start thinking about customer experience or to really change how they’re doing things. And my tip is always become a customer of your own company. It is unbelievable to me how many companies there are, where the executives, the employees, are not customers of their own companies. So they have no idea what customers actually go through.

Joey Coleman (20:49):
Or if they are customers, Dan, they get the special VIP helpline. They don’t have to call into the main call center. They get to, you know, have a private, “immediately picked up” solution to all of their tech problems.

Dan Gingiss (21:03):
They’ve got the Bat Phone on their desk. Right?

Joey Coleman (21:05):
Exactly. Exactly.

Dan Gingiss (21:06):
And yeah. And so that’s not understanding how customers experience you either. And I’ll tell you another thing is if you sit through call listening in a, in a contact center, you’ll be amazed when you hear the customer’s own voice talk about doing business with you. It is eye-opening, it’s humbling and you’ll learn what you’re doing well and what you’re not. And so I think this is so key to get into your customer’s shoes and either become a customer or, you know, in some businesses, it may be impossible for you to do that. You’ve got to saddle up next to an existing customer and have them walk you through what it’s like. Or you’ve got to listen in your call center and hear what people have to say. So I thought this was a really great book to kick off 2021. This idea of avoiding indifference with your employees and your customers is so important. And the idea of understanding the experience from your customer’s eyes, all terrific tips. We encourage you to pick up the Zero In Formula: The Definitive Guide to Building a Disruptive and Sustainable Business Through Customer Centric Innovation” by Dennis Geelen, wherever fine books are sold.

Joey Coleman (22:22):
Almost everyone has interacted with chatbots, but all too often, it’s been a bad experience. In MythBusters – presented by Solvvy – we explore a common myth about CX chatbots and see how the right technology can create a positive experience, every time.

Dan Gingiss (22:47):
Today’s myth about chatbots? they’re designed to replace your support team. Many people think that adding a chat bot means you’ll no longer need live agent support. That support seems there’ll be downsize and that personalization and the high quality of support will inevitably suffer.

Joey Coleman (23:05):
Now while people worry all about the replacement of the support team, the reality is that modern chat bots effectively supplement your team. They don’t replace it. You will always need agents for your VIP customers and for your extremely complex issues. That being said, we can all agree that it’s no fun answering basic, repetitive questions all day long things like password resets, or collecting basic information so that you can find a customer’s account.

Dan Gingiss (23:36):
Chatbots can be invaluable in helping your team to scale during surges and activity, holidays, system outages, and other situations. Modern chatbots are also able to collect some info about a customer’s issue and pass that along to an agent to help speed up resolution time.

Joey Coleman (23:54):
I liked it because while I’m okay with the chat bot, answering a simple question. When I want to talk to a human, I want to talk to a human. We’ll learn more about advances in chat bot and support automation throughout the season.

Dan Gingiss (24:08):
That’s another myth busted – thanks to our friends at Solvvy – the Next Gen Chatbot.

Joey Coleman (24:13):
With a pandemic, sweeping the globe and shifting the way organizations interact with their customers. Many of the old ways of operating just don’t work anymore. As we all navigate a COVID-19 world, it’s time to Redesign the Experience.

Dan Gingiss (24:34):
You may remember way back in episode 46, that we talked about Sipsmith gin and its ingenious pop-up experience to get people, to taste their product in a new way.

Joey Coleman (24:45):
Which I always thought was funny because we’re going to be drinking gin and trying to say Sipsmith gin, Sipsmith gin.

Dan Gingiss (24:53):
Exactly. Keep sipping away! There was the impeccably dressed bartender, the choice of several tonic flavors, the garnish bar with more than a dozen options. And then the personalized name tag that each taster created and of course shared their creation on social media. I love that example so much that I’ve included it in my keynote presentations, and it’ll be in my new book coming out this year (but more on that in a future episode) – anyway, live tastings aren’t exactly popular right now due to the pandemic. So alcohol companies have had to adapt. And one fascinating trend is the return of the 50 milliliter mini bottle.

Joey Coleman (25:32):
Wait, you mean like the ones they have on airplanes or in the hotel minibar?

Dan Gingiss (25:37):
Yes, my world traveling friend, you are correct. And don’t worry. I know that you don’t drink alcohol, but there is something for you in this segment too, if you will just bear with me.

Joey Coleman (25:48):
All right. I’ll hang in there!

Dan Gingiss (25:50):
Many craft distillers have started producing more mini bottles due to tasting room closures and canceled events. As Scott Harris, co-founder of Catoctin Creek Distilling Company, told Whiskey Advocate magazine quote “Store tastings have stopped completely nationwide and without tastings, there is no easy way to get customers to try our products before committing to a larger 750 milliliter purchase.” Not surprisingly whiskey advocate focused on whiskey, examples of the trend, and they range from a $2 Bushmills Red Bush Irish whiskey to a $20 Johnny Walker Blue Label, even coveted single malts have gotten into the game. And one distiller compass box saw success packaging for different mini bottles into a set, essentially a tasting a box. This is a trend that is likely to continue because it gives people the ability to try before they buy any much lower cost. And importantly, just to Sipsmith figured out in a way that they would more typically consume the drink versus a plastic cup shot in the grocery.

Joey Coleman (27:01):
You know, I really liked this idea, Dan, because not only does it give you a little bit of a sampler, but it’s a much better experience for the brand, right? And those little bottles, they’re kind of fun. And, you know, I know from our mutual friend, Rohit Bhargava, there’s actually a mini liquor bottle museum in Scandinavia. Like these are fun, little design pieces. Uh, and I liked the idea that they’re, they’re pivoting and they’re adapting to this new world they’re in and creating something that, you know, consumers will get a chance to try it, you know, before they buy it or make a smaller investment to try it. But I got to admit, I’m a little curious, I mean, while this is interesting, you had mentioned there was a specific part of the story that you said I’d be excited about.

Dan Gingiss (27:43):
Well, actually it’s about a different pandemic trend related to alcohol, and that is that people are drinking more at home. And so there is a newfound demand for, are you ready for it? Non-alcoholic beer.

Joey Coleman (28:00):
Haha! Like, O’Douls and stuff like that?

Dan Gingiss (28:03):
Actually, specifically not like, O’Douls. It’s the craft breweries that are now getting into the game, creating Brown ales, wheat beers, IPA’s coffee, stouts, and even Oktoberfest varieties all without alcohol. Now this follows the success of a very big brand Heineken debuting it’s Heineken 0.0 product in 2019, which quickly became the number one selling non-alcoholic beer in the United States, knocking out your friends at O’Douls by the way. Now, according to the Chicago Tribune, non-alcoholic beer sales were up 38% in 2020. And although it still only represents one half of 1% of the entire beer industry, NAs are sprouting up everywhere and industry observers think that this trend has legs.

Joey Coleman (28:53):
Well, Dan, I am definitely interested in this one. I have not been a consumer of alcohol for wow. Probably close to we’re fast approaching 20 years now, more than 20 years now that I think about it. But what I love about this pivot or this kind of additional offering to the marketplace is, there are so many scenarios where I find myself at a bar or at a happy hour, obviously pre-pandemic and I’m sure this will come back post pandemic where there’s really nothing that I’m excited to order. You know, uh, as our listeners know, I’m a root beer fan. If there’s a root beer, I’m feeling good. If there isn’t a root beer, my default is usually a 7-Up or Sprite and grenadine, which is effectually known in most circles as a Shirley Temple, but it sounds more manly when I order it.

Dan Gingiss (29:48):
Or a kiddie cocktail!

Joey Coleman (29:48):
I like the idea of being able to have different options that, you know, maybe give more of a beer vibe or more importantly, kind of a beer look, because I know that’s important for some people when they’re out networking, they want to have a look as if they’re drinking a beer along with it. So I think this is an interesting, uh, an interesting trend to say the least.

Dan Gingiss (30:09):
Well, and also, I mean, you’re not the only person I know who doesn’t drink or who has stopped drinking alcohol. And there is often this residual desire for the, for the taste of it without the effect of the alcohol. And I think that what’s long been the case, is that NA beers have been a somewhat poor substitute that it just doesn’t, you know, it doesn’t have the bite or it doesn’t have the flavor or whatever. And when I started reading this list of like brown ales and coffee stouts and stuff like that, I think that sounds terrific and, and even as a person who is fine having a beer with alcohol in it, I would be more inclined in certain situations to order the non-alcoholic variety, because now I’ve got something to choose from that actually is interesting.

Joey Coleman (30:59):
Well, and you buy into the marketing, right? And the branding. And I’m not saying that as a, as a bad thing, right? Why do most people choose the products or the services they choose? There’s a heavy influence of branding. And I agree with you, it sounds a lot better to get, you know, a wheat beer or a coffee stout than what I often heard talked about in the bars. I didn’t say this, but, you know, an “O’Don’ts” as opposed to “O’Douls.” Right? And so I think there’s certainly space in the market for these type of offerings.

Dan Gingiss (31:28):
Yeah. And I think, again, the summary here is I thought, I mean, within the span of a week or so, I saw two articles about these two different trends in two different publications. And, you know, the miniature bottle thing is really interesting because companies are having trouble getting people to taste. And when you buy a 750 milliliter bottle, you’re usually forking out, you know, 30, 40, 50, 70, $90. And so people want to taste it before they buy it, which makes sense and they don’t have an avenue to do that. With the non-alcoholic beer piece, you have other parts of the pandemic that have affected this trend. People are drinking more at home and they’re realizing, Hey, I probably should cut back. And also, you know, people are looking for different things and this gives a new choice if you will, uh, to somebody who maybe wants a non-alcoholic option and doesn’t have to succumb to the Shirley temple or the orange juice or whatever it’s going to be. So I thought both of these were really interesting trends that have appeared because of the pandemic, but trends that demonstrate that pandemic era pivots may just create the next big thing. And even if not, are probably here to stay.

Joey Coleman (32:51):
Thanks for joining us for another episode of Experience This! You are the best listener ever!

Dan Gingiss (32:57):
And since you listened to the whole show…

Joey Coleman (32:59):
Yay, you!

Dan Gingiss (33:00):
We’re curious… Was there a specific part of this episode that you enjoyed the most? If so, it would mean the world to us if you could share it with a coworker, a friend, or someone that just loves listening to podcasts!

Joey Coleman (33:11):
And while you’re in the sharing mood, if you felt inclined to jump over to iTunes or wherever you find your podcasts and write us a review, we would so appreciate it. And when you do, don’t forget to let us know as we might have a little surprise for you!

Dan Gingiss (33:26):
Thanks again for your time and we’ll see you next week for more…

Joey Coleman (33:29):
Experience!

Dan Gingiss (33:29):
This!

Episode 118 – I’ll Believe It When I See It

Join us as we discuss encouraging your customers to do business with your competitors, using visuals to connect at every step in the customer journey, and watching how brands behave when they don’t know they are being watched.

Valuing, Videoing, and Voyeuring – Oh My!

[Redesign the Experience] Burger King Wants You to Order a Big Mac

Things We Mentioned in This Segment:

• “Burger King urges customers to order food from McDonald’s, Subway and KFC instead” – Gloucestershire Live Website
• Burger King UK
McDonalds UK
Discover
Humana

[Book Report] The Visual Sale by Marcus Sheridan and Tyler Lessard

Things We Mentioned in This Segment:

• Marcus Sheridan
• The Visual Sale: How to Use Video to Explode Sales, Drive Marketing, and Grow Your Business in a Virtual World – by Marcus Sheridan and Tyler Lassard
• Tyler Lessard
• They Ask, You Answer – by Marcus Sheridan

[Partnership with Avtex] Neen James, Shep Hyken, and Rohit Bhargava – Three of a Kind!

Things We Mentioned in This Segment:

• Experience Points – presented by Avtex
• Neen James
• Shep Hyken
• Rohit Bhargava
• Jay Baer
• Scott McKain
• Marquessa Pettway
• Amanda Kwok
• Jesse Cole

[This Just Happened] What to Do When Your Customers Are Watching You?!

• Kind Delivery Driver Shovels Snow (captured on Ring)
• FedEx
• UPS
• US Postal Service (USPS)
• Ring – doorbell camera
• Delivery Driver Dance on TikTok
• Amazon

Host Contact Information

Email Dan: Dan@dangingiss.com

Tweet Dan Gingiss: @DGingiss

Email Joey: JoeyC@JoeyColeman.com

DanGingiss.com

JoeyColeman.com

Subscribe to Experience This on Apple Podcasts

Episode Transcript

Download an unedited transcript of Episode 118 here or read it below:

[SHOW INTRO]
Dan Gingiss (00:05):
Welcome to Experience This!

Joey Coleman (00:08):
Where you’ll find inspiring examples of customer experience, great stories of customer service, and tips on how to make your customers love you even more!

Dan Gingiss (00:17):
Always upbeat and definitely entertaining customer attention expert, Joey Coleman.

Joey Coleman (00:23):
and social media expert, Dan Gingiss, serve as your host for a weekly dose of positive customer experience.

Dan Gingiss (00:31):
So hold on to your headphones, it’s time to Experience This!

[EPISODE 118 INTRO]
Joey Coleman (00:38):
Get ready for another episode of the Experience This! Show!

Dan Gingiss (00:44):
Join us as we discuss: encouraging your customers to do business with your competitors, using visuals to connect at every step in the customer journey, and watching how brands behave when they don’t know they’re being watched.

Joey Coleman (01:00):
Valuing, videoing, and voyeuring – oh my!

[SEGMENT INTRO – REDESIGN THE EXPERIENCE]
Joey Coleman (01:08):
With a pandemic, sweeping the globe and shifting the way organizations interact with their customers. Many of the old ways of operating just don’t work anymore. As we all navigate a COVID 19 world, it’s time to Redesign the Experience

[REDESIGN THE EXPERIENCE][Burger King Wants You to Eat a Big Mac]
Joey Coleman (01:27):
Through years of eating at restaurants, taking advantage of the drive-thru when I was on a road trip, or even just indulging myself with takeout on a night that I didn’t feel I had the time – or the desire – to cook dinner, I saw something the other day that not only stopped me in my tracks, but I thought that you would find it particularly interesting Dan, due to your past career with McDonald’s.

Dan Gingiss (01:50):
Well, you definitely have my attention, sir. What did you see this time?

Joey Coleman (01:56):
Well, I came across an article on the Gloucestershire Live website.

Dan Gingiss (02:04):
Woah!

Joey Coleman (02:04):
I wondered if I could catch you with that one!

Dan Gingiss (02:06):
The Gloucestershire Live website? Pray tell what is that?

Joey Coleman (02:11):
Yeah. So basically it came up in my newsfeed and I clicked through to read the story, and I must confess I’m not a regular reader of the Gloucestershire website. And I think I’m saying that properly, so correct me if I’m wrong our friends in the UK, but the story I saw was about a statement released by Burger King in the United Kingdom, on the Eve of their most recent lockdown due to COVID-19. And the statement read as follows that I’m directly quoting their release:

Joey Coleman (02:39):
“Order from McDonald’s. We never thought we’d be asking you to do this. Just like we never thought we’d be encouraging you to order from KFC, Subway, Domino’s Pizza, Pizza Hut, Five Guys, Greg’s, Taco Bell, Papa John’s, Leon, or any of the other independent food outlets, too numerous to mention here. In short, from any of our sister food chains – fast, or not so fast. We never thought we’d be asking you to do this, but restaurants, employing thousands of staff really need your support at this moment. So if you want to help, keep treating yourself to tasty meals through home delivery, takeaway, or drive through. Getting a Whopper is always best, but ordering a Big Mac is also not such a bad thing. Take care. Team Burger King, UK.

Dan Gingiss (03:32):
Wow man. I got, like, a tear in my eye.

Joey Coleman (03:36):
I mean, talk about in the world of press releases. Like how many press releases are written every day that no one reads because they are boring and drivel, and just, you know, feel like they were written by a robot that had zero empathy. But this one, I was like, wow, this is it. That’s pulling the heart. You know, “all the feels” as the kids say, right? Yeah.

Dan Gingiss (03:58):
Well, and this was also posted in social media all over the place, uh, went viral and uh, I actually not only saw the original post, but they ended up adding more of their local competitors in a comment underneath it because I think some people responded and they said, Hey, don’t forget about this one or this one. And they started naming all these hamburger places I’ve never heard of before. But so I’m just assuming that they’re UK places. But I think obviously the sentiment is really cool. I, one of the things that I learned at McDonald’s it’s the first and only time that I worked for a leader brand L E a D E R brand, as opposed to a follower brand, you know, Discover, Humana there. Those are follower brands that are not the largest in their market. And the thing is, is that basically when you’re the leader brand, it actually tends to limit your flexibility in terms of doing creative things like this, because everyone’s chasing you and waiting for you to make a mistake. And so what ended up happening certainly at McDonald’s was it, there was just this very conservative protectionism of the brand that they would have never done something like this. Whereas

Joey Coleman (05:11):
Yeah, I think it’s, it’s hard to be creative if you, when you’re the 900 pound gorilla in the room.

Dan Gingiss (05:17):
Yeah. And I think burger King, what’s cool about this is what do they have to lose to do this? I mean, it’s certainly ambitious. It’s different unique. It got people talking. And my hope for them is that it lifted their brand. I mean, that’s the, as the marketer in me, that’s the only thing I would worry about is like, man, you just listed every one of your competitors. Let’s make sure people remember that this is a Burger King ad, but from all the press this got, I think they did.

Joey Coleman (05:44):
Absolutely. And here’s the thing your customers know who your competitors are. Okay. Burger King, like Burger King, doesn’t really need to worry about, geez, we listed Papa John’s in that press release. I everybody’s got, they already knew Papa John’s existed. Right. And so I think this idea of acknowledging the reality is really important. I know we’ve talked about it in past episodes, but it’s like if you go into a store and you’re traveling and you’re like, Hey, I need to get a, a car adapter for my phone or a car charger for my phone. And they’re like, Oh, we don’t have that in this store. When I say, “well, do you know anywhere nearby that might have one?” it doesn’t hurt your brand to be honest and say, actually, there’s another, you know, cell phone store, two blocks away that might, it helps your brand because you’ve helped me solve a problem. And I think the reality here is the folks at Team Burger King in the UK have realized that they have a huge problem. And the huge problem may have is people are not eating out anymore. They are not going to restaurants. And a lot of people are scared to even do take out or drive through at the restaurants. And so by saying, Hey, whether it’s us or at one of our competitors, we kind of don’t care. Just keep going to restaurants because they want to condition the behavior. What we’re already seeing across a lot of different industries is that the COVID 19 pandemic experience is changing behaviors, at a human level, much faster than we’ve ever experienced before. I mean, you have plenty of people in the medical world that would have told you that telemedicine was 20 years away. Well, not until 2020, because now it’s right now, everybody wants telemedicine. You had plenty of people in the education world saying, well, there’s no way we could do virtual schooling for elementary school students. And yet almost every school in the United States, and in many countries around the world, has at least experimented with some level of virtual schooling over the course of the last few months. And so I think the reality is when your category is suffering, when your entire part in the marketplace is suffering, you know, drastic times call for drastic measures.

Dan Gingiss (08:04):
Well, yeah and also I would say that more generally and not pandemic specific is burger King understands that just because someone is a burger King customer, does it mean that burger King is the only restaurant that they ever go-to ever? I mean, in fact, most of the time, that’s not true. I remember, uh, I think we may have talked about this once before, but I, uh, I had an ill-fated experience of buying a restaurant franchise that never ended up opening. [inaudible]

Joey Coleman (08:37):
I don’t think I’ve ever heard this story, ladies and gentlemen, we’ll put a pin in this for next season. This is brand new to me. Right?

Dan Gingiss (08:45):
In any event, one of the goals that I had, this was in downtown Chicago ,was just getting onto people’s rotations because you have all these people that work in the city and they go out to lunch day and I knew they weren’t going to come to my place every day. I couldn’t expect them to come five days a week, but man, if I could get them once a week, that was huge because, and then the next day they’re going to go to my competitor. And the day after that, they’re going to go to a different competitor. But if I could get them once a week, that would make my business. So burger King understands that. And like you said, they understand that it’s not like we’re sharing some secret that McDonald’s is our competitor. Like people already know that.

Joey Coleman (09:22):
Absolutely. And I think at the end of the day, what we need more of in business is the acknowledgement of the reality. Let’s stop pretending that the customer is just foolish, that they’re just blind to the realities of life. You know, your customer is shopping at your competitors as well. I don’t care what industry you’re in. I don’t care what brand you’re is. They have sampled the goods elsewhere. Okay. Now they’ve decided to come with you, but to your point in the restaurant industry, they’re not coming every day and that’s okay. You probably don’t want them coming to your restaurant every day, right? That’s a different subset of customer that you have to,

Dan Gingiss (10:02):
They made a movie about that, where the guy went to McDonald’s every day didn’t turn out very well for him, not so well. So,

Joey Coleman (10:07):
Well, I think at the end of the day, we need to realize that getting our customers to make purchases in our category is almost as important as getting them to make purchases from us. Or at least it’s a close second. And I think the other thing that we want to recognize is that the times are changing. And if you don’t start to acknowledge that reality, you’re missing the point. So what can we learn from this story and Burger King UK encouraging their customers to, Oh, give money to the competition? Well, we can learn this COVID-19 has caused incredible stress in the lives of people around the world, from our health to our habits, the massive changes we’ve experienced over the last nine to 10 months have impacted all of us in obvious and not so obvious ways. And the reality is that dozens of industries are struggling, not just individual businesses, I’m talking about entire industries. And when an industry is struggling as is the case with the restaurant industry, for example, it’s not about saving a specific location, or a specific store, specific branch, we all need to think broader about what we can do to save an entire industry. By doing something small, like picking up takeout or spreading the love across several different restaurants, instead of just your signature, favorite place to eat, we can all play a role in keeping things moving forward. So consider what you’re going to do to help your industry navigate this pandemic era, consider what you’re going to do to help grow your industry, not just your specific business. And as you think about your meal planning over the holidays, consider picking up some takeout from your favorite restaurant and bring it home to your family. Not only will you feed your loved ones in a safe and healthy way, but you’ll contribute to feeding those restaurant employees. And in fact, the entire restaurant industry with your patronage.

[SEGMENT INTRO – BOOK REPORT]
Joey Coleman (12:10):
We’re excited to give you an overview of an important book you should know about as well as share some of our favorite passages as part of our next Book Report.

[BOOK REPORT][The Visual Sale by Marcus Sheridan and Tyler Lessard]
Joey Coleman (12:22):
Dan, as we wrap up 2020 and think about the future of customer communications, do you think businesses and organizations will need to use more or less video?

Dan Gingiss (12:34):
Well, you know, it pains me to say this, but I do believe that the answer is obviously more and it pains me because, uh, I radically for a guy that loves podcasting, and loves being on stage, I’m still not very comfortable on video. And you know, my mom will tell you, even as a kid, I never liked my picture getting taken. And it’s still not very comfortable for me, but I do think for companies and for brands, it’s a must-have.

Joey Coleman (13:01):
Yeah. And I didn’t think for a minute that Mrs. Gingiss was going to say you had a face for radio. Okay. So don’t worry. I was not thinking that!

Dan Gingiss (13:09):
I’m sure you weren’t thinking that ever!

Joey Coleman (13:11):
I appreciate that. And I think it’s one of those things where it’s kind of like flossing, everybody knows they should be doing it, but that step of getting from not doing it to starting to doing it, to doing it regularly, feels like a big leap for…

Dan Gingiss (13:25):
Doing it well…

Joey Coleman (13:26):
and doing it well, right.

Dan Gingiss (13:28):
Because even regularly doesn’t necessarily get you there.

Joey Coleman (13:30):
Totally, totally. Which is why I’m super excited to share the newest book by our mutual friend, Marcus Sheridan, as part of this episode’s Book Report.

Dan Gingiss (13:42):
Okay. So you and I both love Marcus. Can’t say enough about him. I joke with him that I’ve sold more copies of his book. They ask you answer than of my own books because I’ve recommended it and bought it for so many people. And he is also, and I say this with great respect, even to you, my friend, Joey, cause you know, I’ve heard this before. I’ve said this before he is my single favorite speaker, the closing keynote that he did at Social Media Marketing World. And I think 2017 was still to this day, the best keynote I’ve ever seen. And that’s saying a lot, I’ve been, I’ve been to a lot of keynotes.

Joey Coleman (14:23):
I totally, I totally agree with you. World-class I have, I was not in the room for that keynote. And I’ve heard about that keynote from dozens of people. Yeah. Marcus is a gem. When Marcus talks you should listen, which is ironic because our loyal listeners will remember. We shared Marcus’ work before, when we talked about his first book, They Ask, You Answer.

Dan Gingiss (14:45):
And that of course would be back all the way in season one, episode four, for those keeping score at home.

Joey Coleman (14:52):
Well, you really had to go back into the archives for that one rain man. I love it. Well, yes, it has been a while since we’ve shared, Marcus’ writing with our listeners, but frankly, any time Marcus put something down on paper, I want to read it. And so when he published this new book, I was all over it. In fact, I pre-ordered my copy of the book before it was even published. So I could dive in the day it was released. And I devoured this book. The book is titled, “The Visual Sale: How to Use Video to Explode Sales, Drive Marketing, and Grow Your Business in a Virtual World. Now I realize it’s a bit of a brain twister to think about reading a book about videos, but the reality is most business owners. I talk to know that they need to be doing more with video, but they aren’t exactly sure how to create a culture of video within their organization, which is why I absolutely love Marcus’s message. Now, before I steal too much of his thunder, here’s Marcus giving us an overview of his new book.

Marcus Sheridan (15:54):
I am Marcus Sheridan, one of the authors of the book, along with Tyler Lasara and here’s the thing my friends we know at this point, at least certainly most of us that as organizations and businesses, if we want to be successful in 2021 and beyond, we must show it. Can’t just tell it. We’ve got to show it. So we’ve got all these companies around the world that are looking to create a culture of video and do video and be more effective with video. And the thing about it is there’s a lot of books out there that talk about how you can be a blogger and how you can build your brand with video, but they don’t speak to businesses and organizations. And certainly they don’t come from a perspective of sales first marketing second. And that’s one of the big points to the book. We’re going to start with videos that actually get results. The types of videos, starting with sales, like videos that your sales team will truly get excited about integrating enter their sales process. And then of course the marketing videos, types of videos that are going to get you the most revolt results in terms of traffic leads and ultimately sales. We want to also show you in this work, other companies that have done this incredibly well. So we’re going to share with you multiple B to B and B to C case studies. So you can see yourself and these businesses realize that no, you’re not the exception that yes, video absolutely does apply to you regardless of what you sell B to B, B to C service, big, small, we’ve all got to get on this train that is video. And then finally, we’re going to look at in this work, how you can create a culture of video in house. And that’s such a big key because it’s one thing to outsource your video to another organization. It’s an entire different thing to in-source it, to produce your own content because the future of digital is going to be in house ownership of content. We also have a couple of bonus sections there about how to do more effective virtual events and virtual selling for your sales team, especially in a post COVID world. So if you’re looking to do amazing things with video and visual, make sure you check it out, The Visual Sale.

Dan Gingiss (18:48):
We can’t just tell it, we’ve got to show it. I love it when Marcus said that, because let’s be honest, seeing is believing. It’s always been that way. And video allows you to see the business or individual that you’re dealing with in a way that frankly, email or taxed or direct mail just can’t accomplish. And that’s why we said at the beginning here, that video is and is going to continue to be an important part of communications going forward for every business. And I think one of the things that maybe is not said here is what are we talking about video? We’re not talking about yet another television commercial. I remember very early days in Facebook, a company, you know, saying to me, Hey, we should put our TV commercials on Facebook. No, actually they didn’t want to see it on TV. Yeah. So what Marcus is talking about is genuine communication and he is, you know, the number one sales guy and, and teaching salespeople all over the world. And he’s talking about making a one-to-one connection with somebody through video, not a one-to-mass video type situation.

Joey Coleman (20:07):
Absolutely. And I think video, it just allows for such a richer narrative and a deeper narrative. And as you point out Dan, a more personalized narrative, it’s definitely the way businesses need to be moving and they need to be moving strategically that way. You know, this is one of those books that had me highlighting passage after passage to the point where I was almost like, Oh my gosh, am I going to highlight the entire book? But before we get into some of our favorite parts of the book, I think it’s only fair to let Marcus share the epiphany he had when it came to using videos to connect with customers. And he did it in an industry that let’s be honest, before Marcus, was not that well known for its use of video. Here’s what Marcus had to say:

Marcus Sheridan (20:55):
I used to be a pool guy. Wait a minute. What does a pool guy know about video? You see, for years, my job was cut and dry in ground swimming pool shoppers would call our company river pools and spas. Then in most cases I would make the long drive to their home with the intention to yes, sell them a swimming pool more often than not. When I would knock on the front door of a home for one of these calls, I’d hear a child’s voice in the background, yell at something to the effect of mom, dad, pool guys here. So that was me, just the pool guy, no name, no face just to knock on the door. But then one night after we had embraced the philosophy of what I now call the visual sale, everything changed. You see on that particular occasion, as I knocked on the door, I heard a child in the background say, mom, dad, the guy on the video is here. And eyebrow immediately raised the child, knew my face. It wasn’t just another pool guy. I was more than that, much more, but the story doesn’t stop there a year or so later at the end of my career as a swimming pool sales guy, I had another occasion when I walked up to her front door for a sales appointment and something absolutely magical happened. Mom, dad, Marcus from the video is here. I had a name, I had a face. They knew me. It was because of this experience. My eyes were opened to a definitive reality – the visual sale is real.

Dan Gingiss (22:33):
I love this concept of video creating a connection before you ever get to meet in person with your customer. And man, have we seen a lot of that in 2020, right? Where we’ve had to be virtual. And uh, and you know, I said before that I don’t love video. And it’s kind of funny to say that in 2020, because heck I’ve spent my whole darn year on video. And so have we all. And I think what we can take away from that is that we’re all probably better at this video stuff than we think we are. And we now know what it’s like to try to get to know someone and establish a connection and establish a relationship when you’re not in the same room with them. And we should be able to carry those learnings even into a future where hopefully not everything has to be virtual. So Joey, there were a lot of things that I liked about this book and it’s obviously chock full of tips and strategies and case studies for using video in marketing and sales activities. But that being said, I wanted to share a passage that is more specifically dealing with using video to create remarkable customer experiences after the sale. So from book, and I quote:

Dan Gingiss (23:47):
One of the easiest ways to delight customers is to use authentic video content, to break down the digital divide between the people within your respective organizations, the more familiar they are with the real people across your teams, the more connected they’ll feel to your brand. And the more likely they are to go to bat for you. If a customer has a dedicated account manager, chances are they’ve met them in person or via video conferencing, but what about the scores of others across different teams who also contribute to their success? The passionate exacts, the dedicated developers to heroic service reps and even the amazing accountant who is trying to make their procurement process as seamless as possible. There are numerous ways to get your people on camera, to introduce themselves to new accounts, much like creating micro demos for your products. You can also create micro intros for people across your company that can be used in different ways as needed.

Joey Coleman (24:40):
Oh, I love that passage, Dan, you know that whole idea, micro demos. I’ve, I’ve seen those, Oh, so many different companies in so many different ways. And I think that’s how the majority of companies today that are using video and are using a lot of video, think about it. They think about using video as part of the marketing process or the sales process. What Marcus is encouraging us to do is to go beyond the sale, go beyond when we’re in the actual relationship in those first hundred days, we talk about how can you incorporate video? So I absolutely love it. You know, one of the things I particularly loved about this book, Dan is it has so many case studies that beautifully show… see, see what I did there?!

Dan Gingiss (25:24):
Yeah. Okay. I get it. A book on video that shows.

Joey Coleman (25:28):
Yeah. Yeah, exactly. Okay. Well, one of the companies that is profiled in the book, uh, with a case study is called lucid chart. And as Marcus explains, quote:

Joey Coleman (25:40):
Their exceptionally funny and surprisingly educational YouTube series called lucid chart explains the internet offers dozens of one minute videos explaining different topics, concepts, or pop culture movements in a way that is fast paced, very fun. And oddly addictive while the topic of each video has nothing to do with lucid charts products. The big reveal after 55 seconds is that the tool they used to illustrate and visualize the content in the video was none other than lucid chart. So not only did you just learn how Luke Skywalker is related to Princess Leia, you discovered a great new tool that could help your team at work, create equally awesome diagrams, and charts, and data visualizations for great collaboration. What’s more thanks to all of the sharing and fanfare lucid charts, product overview and tutorial videos have been viewed more than 1 million times.

Dan Gingiss (26:40):
Wowzers! And of course I knew you would find the Star Wars example in the book Joey. Right.

Joey Coleman (26:45):
Very true.

Dan Gingiss (26:45):
It is indeed a great case study for how to showcase a product without making it feel like a sales pitch.

Joey Coleman (26:52):
So true. I so agree with you, Dan, and yes, if you get the chance friends go to YouTube search lucid chart, explain Star Wars, and you can see the great example that Marcus referenced in that quote. And by the way, we’ll also link to it in the show notes at ExperienceThisShow.com. So here’s the scoop. You may be using video now, or you may not, but for sure you will need to be using it more in the future. Get ahead of the competition, avoid making beginner mistakes and learn how to create a culture of video within your organization. By picking up a copy of The Visual Sale: How to Use Video to Explode Sales, Drive Marketing, and Grow Your Business in a Virtual World. Friends, it’s a fast read. It’s an entertaining read. It’s a knowledge giving read, and it’s a book that can and should serve as a roadmap when it comes to your strategic plans for 2021. And since it’s Christmas week and I’m feeling festive, let’s just say this, we’re going to call a little audible here. Uh, the first three people to share this episode of Experience This on social media and tag me, or Dan, or both of us.

Dan Gingiss (28:00):
Uh, but if it’s Twitter, you better tag me.

Joey Coleman (28:02):
It’s so true. So true. If it’s Twitter tag, Dan hashtag Dan’s the Twitter guy. Uh, but the first three people that share this episode on social media and encourage people to check out Marcus’s book, the visual sale will get their very own signed copy of the book, courtesy of The Experience This! Show!

Dan Gingiss (28:21):
Wait a minute, what do they want? Marcus’s book signed by us for?

Joey Coleman (28:25):
No, no, no… signed by Marcus, but who knows? Maybe we’ll sell it too, but yeah, it’ll be a surprise folks. So share away and let’s help everyone. We know get better at video in 2021.

[Partnership with Avtex] Neen James, Shep Hyken, and Rohit Bhargava – Three of a Kind!
Dan Gingiss (28:44):
What do Neen James, Shep Hyken, and Rohit Bhargava have in common?

Joey Coleman (28:49):
Well, they are the only people, you know, with those first names?!

Dan Gingiss (28:56):
I see what you did there… Neen, Shep, Rohit. Yeah, actually that is definitely true.

Joey Coleman (29:01):
unique names,

Dan Gingiss (29:02):
but not what I was thinking.

Joey Coleman (29:03):
Oh, okay.

Dan Gingiss (29:04):
So they are actually the first three celebrity contestants on our new game show – Experience Points brought to you by our partners at Avtex, who transform customer experience through CX design and orchestration of

Joey Coleman (29:20):
And what fantastic contestants they were. You can see how Neen, and Shep, and Rohit did as they brought their customer experience strategies and wisdom to bear playing three games that we designed to test their knowledge in both an entertaining and fun way. And in the process, you can also see them win prize money for their favorite charity.

Dan Gingiss (29:42):
It’s the most fun you can have talking about customer experience folks. So take some time to check out the games played by our first three contestants, Neen, Shep, and Rohit, and stay tuned for more customer experience professionals like Jay Baer, Scott McCain, Marquessa Pettway, Amanda Kwok, Jesse Cole, and more in the weeks to come.

Joey Coleman (30:05):
Now you can watch episodes of experience points on YouTube. Just check out the Avtex Solutions channel or online at www.ExperiencePointsGame.com that’s ExperiencePointsGame.com.

Dan Gingiss (30:21):
You can also listen to the games on your favorite podcast app by searching for Avtex Experience Points, not to be confused with that gamer podcast called “Experience Points,” make sure to include Avtex that’s A-V-T-E-X in your search, but don’t worry. We’ll also link to it in our show notes.

Joey Coleman (30:38):
We so hope you enjoyed the show and Experience Points!

[SEGMENT INTRO – THIS JUST HAPPENED]
Joey Coleman (30:44):
We love telling stories and sharing key insights you can implement, or avoid, based on our experiences. Can you believe that This Just Happened?!

[THIS JUST HAPPENED][What To Do When Your Customers Are Watching You?!]
Dan Gingiss (30:57):
As you know Dan, I’ve just moved back to my childhood home of Fort Dodge, Iowa. And while my family is adjusting to our new setup here, my extended family that already lived here in town is adjusting to some of my habits and behaviors as well. And to be honest, the one they’ve commented on the most is how much the ups and FedEx drivers must love my family.

Dan Gingiss (31:21):
Oh my gosh. I can relate to that man every day, something else arriving at the doorstep. And I tell you, especially on the cold days, like today in Chicago, I always, if I see them, I always try to open up the door and yell out. Thank you as they’re running back to their truck because, uh, man, they do yeoman’s work. And uh, and they’re certainly filling up my doorstep as well.

Joey Coleman (31:42):
They really do. And I think as I don’t know about you, our effort to have delivery of things has dramatically increased in the COVID era. I look at it as it allows us to continue to kind of function and get the things we need in our house, but we’re not exposing other people to us or being exposed by other people when we go out. So lots of deliveries coming these days, which is actually why I wanted to talk to you about something that we’ve talked about a little bit in past episodes. And that is the experience created by your partners – in this case, fine delivery drivers at FedEx, at UPS, and the US Post Office. But specifically I wanted to talk about what the drivers are doing when no one is watching or at least they think no one is watching. This is starting to sound a little creepy, Joey. All right. Sorry about that, Dan, let me explain. Uh, I saw a video the other day of a delivery driver dropping off a package for an elderly person. And then the driver proceeded to shovel the snow off of the porch and the steps to the house. Now, to be clear, the person who lived in the house didn’t see this happening live, but they did see it later when they reviewed the video feed from their Ring cam.

Dan Gingiss (33:00):
Ahh, yes, I saw this video as well. And for those that may not know, Ring is a company that makes a video doorbell system and it allows people to record what is happening when people approach their door to ring the bell and drop off packages, et cetera. And you know, sometimes it does catch people doing things that they don’t know that it’s catching them to. And sometimes those things are things that they don’t want to be caught doing. And in this particular case, it was something that, uh, it turned out. It was very nice that someone caught this person doing.

Joey Coleman (33:34):
Yeah. I mean, there’s certainly been the, the negative videos. We’ve probably all seen the drivers throwing the package over the fence or kicking the box up onto the front steps or whatever it may be. But I know I also saw some during COVID where they had videos of drivers, you know, they had left snacks for the drivers or hand sanitizer. And I even saw one where there was like a little box that encouraged them to do a Tik TOK dance. And like when they stepped on the box, it started playing the music and you saw a bunch of drivers kind of walking around the box and then eventually a driver comes along and does it, and they’ve obviously got it all on video, which is just fascinating. When we think about this idea that drivers are being filmed in front of people’s homes when the people might not even be in the house.

Dan Gingiss (34:20):
Yeah. And it does, uh, I mean, as I mentioned, there’s a little bit of a creepiness factor to it, but it does sort of beg the question of how many opportunities do we have to maybe find out what other people are doing when they don’t think that they’re being watched. So I’m kind of thinking about employees, for example. Right, right now we trust that all of our employees are diligently working from home at their home offices and sitting at their desks all day and stuff. But yeah, we really don’t know.

Joey Coleman (34:48):
And we don’t want to obviously get too Big Brother-ish about it and that’s not why I wanted to bring up the story. But what I think is fascinating is when we recognize that we are “on all the time,” that is the delivery driver is being watched. Even if no, one’s there, it creates some opportunities for creating remarkable experiences, because if you know that person isn’t there, but you know, they have a ring cam and you do a little dance or you say a little message or you even trust wave. It creates some personal connection. Now, what I think is really interesting is if we take it one step further and this does get a little Big Brother-ish, but to be frank, it wouldn’t surprise me if this started to happen, Ring at the company that makes, uh, kind of the leader in the video solutions is owned by Amazon and Amazon has been making a big push as I’m sure you and our listeners are well aware of Dan to create their own delivery service, where they have their own airplanes, their own trucks doing the delivery. So they’re kind of weaning themselves off of FedEx and ups in the U S post office to have their own kind of independent carriers they partner with. I could see a scenario where Amazon, because they have access to the video feed from ring, started to match up the ability to see their drivers, making the deliveries and really do some quality control on the full customer experience that they can’t currently do with UPS and FedEx.

Dan Gingiss (36:24):
Well, yeah, and I, I mean, as we know today, the drivers generally take pictures of the packages and, and you can see them, uh, on your Amazon account or you get a, a text or a, uh, an alert on the app. And I think that’s a good step that, that certainly makes customers feel good. But Amazon does have a last mile problem that, that you know, is well documented that, that, you know, they control pretty much the entire experience right up until the end, because the person delivering to you is often not an Amazon employee. Now we have started to see those ubiquitous Amazon vans around our neighborhood. I don’t know if you see them around yours and I, I’m pretty sure those are Amazon employees, but I think you’re right, that this may be something where, uh, Amazon wants to, like you said, do some quality control for the part that maybe they don’t oversee now or, or can’t control in any way.

Joey Coleman (37:24):
Well, absolutely. And I think psychologists would tell us that primacy and latency theory is at play. We remember the first experience we have with a brand and the last experience we have with a brand. And one of the big challenges that Amazon has, which you allude to, is the lack of control over the last mile. The last experience that we have is with the UPS driver, or the FedEx driver, or the Post Office driver, increasingly more of the folks that are coming out of the Amazon delivery van, which is great. And, you know, we could have a whole separate conversation about the way they’ve structured that business and that business model. But the reality is Amazon has been built from day one as a company that placed high emphasis on customer experience. And I just think it’s fascinating to think about how technology merges all these things together. I know in our last episode, episode 117 – even I can remember that one friends! – we talked about AI and how AI could be used. I could see an AI sitting on top of this that was looking at deliveries and the behaviors, and maybe even starting to incentivize drivers for doing creative things, for doing more personalized things when quote unquote they’re on video to create an even more interesting or maybe even viral story.

Dan Gingiss (38:41):
Oh, for sure. And I mean, the, the, the companies that are creative about it and realize that every part of the experience is important. And what’s fascinating here is that this last mile piece is maybe among the most important parts of the experience for the actual customer, but yet the farthest away from the actual company delivering it. And so I definitely think that there are some interesting options.

Joey Coleman (39:10):
Absolutely. And let’s be candid. This isn’t just an issue for Amazon. This is an issue for every company that delivers in the e-commerce space. And as we find ourselves in the holiday season where I’m sure when it’s all said and done more deliveries will have been made in the month of December of 2020 than at any other time in FedEx or UPS or US Post Office history, the reality is more and more people are moving into delivery models and more and more people are getting cameras, whether that’s a Ring camera, security camera, even just the cam on their phone. And so there’s a lot more opportunity for these worlds to collide. So how does this apply to your business? Here’s the question? Do you have situations where your employees are participating in customer related activities that may not be seen live by the customer – but might be being filmed? Do your employees do things while wearing their uniforms or going about their daily activities that could be captured on video to either help, or hurt, your brand image? If you do, and frankly, even if you don’t, you should be talking to your employees about the way video is being used to capture and share evidence of both negative and positive experiences, and then decide what you can do to make sure your team is well-trained and prepared to deliver these remarkable experiences… even if they think no one else is watching!

[SEASON SIX CONCLUSION]
Joey Coleman (40:41):
We did it. Another season of the Experience This! Show is coming to a wrap with this, our final episode of 2020, and our concluding episode of season six.

Dan Gingiss (40:53):
What a crazy year 2020 has been – from pandemics to protests, from lockdowns to launches, from live streams to contactless delivery, to zoom calls, this year has had it all and then some!

Joey Coleman (41:07):
And season six would not have happened without the support and participation of many remarkable people, including our featured guests who submitted audio recordings to add to the conversation, our wonderful book report authors and the loyal listeners who shared their experiences for us to incorporate into our listener stories throughout the season, which we loved. And we want to have more of next season. So keep thinking about submitting those listener.

Dan Gingiss (41:34):
We also couldn’t have made the season happen without our incredible long-term partners at Avtex and in particular, their fantastic director of revenue, marketing, Marshall Salisbury, Marshall, and his team, including Andy, Beth, Joseph, Greta, and John has supported the Experience This! Show for three seasons via their partnership and 2020 marked a new endeavor for all of us as we produced a fun new game show, Experience Points.

Joey Coleman (42:00):
We also want to thank our longterm friends, that Yoko Co. – that’s Stacy, Max, and Chris – who year after year maintain and update the Experience This! Show.com website, where you can find our show notes and share your stories with us. We also need to give a special shout out to our new for 2020 sound engineer, Daniel Romero’s affectionately known as Dr. Podcast who helped us mix and master our weekly shows remotely. Since we couldn’t do the in studio recording, we’ve done because of COVID 19 folks, when there’s a pandemic going on, it helps to have a doctor on your podcast team.

Dan Gingiss (42:35):
It does indeed. And we certainly want to give a shout out to Joey’s law school roommate, Davin Seaman, who continues to serve as the composer of all of our show music, artfully creating new segment trailers whenever we come up with new segments that we want to share with all of you!

Joey Coleman (42:50):
And it wouldn’t be a proper roundup of thank yous and gratitude if we didn’t conclude by thanking all of our wonderful loyal listeners. The way you continue to show up every week on iTunes, or Spotify, or Stitcher, or wherever you’re listening to us, is the driving force behind our desire to continue producing this show. We are so thankful that you enable us to continue to do something that Dan and I love, and we greatly appreciate your consistent and ongoing support.

Dan Gingiss (43:20):
So thanks for a fantastic season six. And we’ll see you back in early February of 2021 for our seventh season of Experience This!

Joey Coleman (43:30):
I think that’ll make it our lucky season won’t it Dan? Season seven? Our lucky season? Well, rest assured that we’re already thinking about fun things to share with you for your weekly dose of positive customer experience. See you in 2021.

[SHOW OUTRO]
Joey Coleman (43:50):
Wow. Thanks for joining us for another episode of Experience This!

Dan Gingiss (43:54):
We know there are tons of podcasts to listen to, magazines and books to read, reality TV to watch. We don’t take for granted that you’ve decided to spend some quality time listening to the two of us.

Joey Coleman (44:03):
We hope you enjoyed our discussions, and if you do, we’d love to hear about it. Come on over to ExperienceThis Show.com and let us know what segments you enjoyed, what new segments you’d like to hear. This show is all about experience, and we want you to be part of the Experience This! Show!

Dan Gingiss (44:21):
Thanks again for your time and we’ll see you next week for more.

Joey Coleman (44:25):
Experience

Dan Gingiss (44:25):
This!

Episode 112 – Little Things Make a Big Difference in Customer Experience


Join us as we discuss a little touch that drew a lot of attention, the power of seeing someone’s face when they speak, and a viral sensation that brought together two classic brands..

Fretboard, Facemask, and Fleetwood – Oh My!

[Listener Stories] The Power of Little Notes

Things We Mentioned in This Segment:

Jeff Robbins, customer experience professional andExperience This! Show listener
• Fretboard Coffee
• Dave Elman, owner of Fretboard Coffee
• Submit Your Listener Story Here

[ReDesign the Experience] The Apple Mask

Things We Mentioned in This Segment:

Apple Design Teams Develop Special Face Masks for Employees – by Mark Gurman in Bloomberg.com
• KN95 Mask (N95 mask)
• Apple
Apple Mask – courtesy of Mark Gurman (Twitter: @markgurman)
Clear Mask
Gallaudet University
Episode 42, Season 2

[Partnership with Avtex] Playing Experience Points – What Happened?

Things We Mentioned in This Segment:

• Avtex
• Experience Points

[CX Press] TikTok + DoggFace + Ocean Spray + Fleetwood Mac = Viral Video

Things We Mentioned in This Segment:

Ocean Spray Just Gave Viral Skateboarding TikTok Guy an Extraordinary Gift – It’s a Lesson in Emotional Intelligence – by Justin Bariso in Inc.com
• Nathan “DoggFace” Apodaca TikTok video (original)
• Ocean Spray
• Fleetwood Mac
• Dreams by Fleetwood Mac
• Nissan Frontier Pickup
• Thank You Nissan and Ocean Spray TikTok video
• Tom Hays, CEO at Ocean Spray Cranberries
• Tom Hays TikTik video
• Billboard – Fleetwood Mac

Host Contact Information

Email Dan: Dan@dangingiss.com

Tweet Dan Gingiss: @DGingiss

Email Joey: JoeyC@JoeyColeman.com

DanGingiss.com

JoeyColeman.com

Subscribe to Experience This on Apple Podcasts

Episode Transcript

Download an unedited transcript of Episode 112 here or read it below:

[SHOW INTRO]
Dan Gingiss (00:05):
Welcome to Experience This!

Joey Coleman (00:08):
Where you’ll find inspiring examples of customer experience, great stories of customer service, and tips on how to make your customers love you even more!

Dan Gingiss (00:17):
Always upbeat and definitely entertaining customer attention expert, Joey Coleman

Joey Coleman (00:23):
and social media expert, Dan Gingiss serve as your hosts for a weekly dose of positive customer experience.

Dan Gingiss (00:30):
So hold on to your headphones, it’s time to Experience This!

[EPISODE 112 INTRO]
Joey Coleman (00:40):
Get ready for another episode of the Experience This Show!

Dan Gingiss (00:44):
Join us as we discuss a little touch that drew a lot of attention, the power of seeing someone’s face when they speak, and a viral sensation that brought together two classic brands.

Joey Coleman (00:58):
Fretboard, face mask, and Fleetwood… Oh my!

[SEGMENT INTRO – LISTENER STORIES]
Joey Coleman (01:04):
You listened to us. Now, we want to listen to you by visiting our website and sharing your remarkable customer experiences with us. We can share them with a broader audience. Now, sit back and enjoy our Listener Stories.

[LISTENER STORIES][The Power of Little Notes]
Joey Coleman (01:22):
We’ve got the best listeners in the world, don’t we Dan!

Dan Gingiss (01:25):
I could not agree with you more, Joey. I get so excited when people give us feedback and tell us how much they love the show, or they point out a specific segment. And it just makes me feel like the work that we put into this show is worth something to people and that we’re helping them. And I think that is very rewarding.

Joey Coleman (01:46):
Absolutely. And you know, we’re big fans of creating an actionable show, but we’re also big fans of the fact that we’re not the only two having experiences in the world. And we regularly get messages from our listeners where they share interesting stories about something that’s happened to them that they thought we might enjoy.

Dan Gingiss (02:06):
And we definitely enjoy them.

Joey Coleman (02:08):
Yes we do. Which is why we were thrilled to receive the following message from Jeff Robbins, a loyal listener of Experience This:

Jeff Robbins (02:17):
Dan and Joey longtime listener. First time recorder wanted to share a story with you, a kind of experience, economy type story, taking a basic commodity to making it into an experience for you. Uh, live in Columbia, Missouri. I’m a experienced professional here and coffee shop here, small little local coffee shop. When you buy a pound of coffee, you open up the package and there’s a business card in there with the name of the company on there. And then there’s on the back that says your coffee was born while we rock too. And then I’ll tell you the song and the artist. And it says, thanks for the little musical note. It’s all handwritten. It’s a great little surprise. The first I saw it, I was like blown away. And so just instantly became loyal to this local roaster and a great, great coffee. And the name of the coffee shop is Fretboard – so it has a musical vibe to it. So want to share that with you? Thanks so much. Appreciate your show.

Dan Gingiss (03:19):
Okay. First of all, I love long time listener. First time recorder, outstanding way to start your submission, Jeff. We really appreciate it. Great story. This sounds like an amazing place. Really. It means a lot to us that you are helping us find really cool experiences that are out there. Because a lot of the stories that we tell here are personal experiences or from our own friends and family. And so when we have listeners submit them, it really means a lot to us and we will share them all day long people because we love hearing about new experiences.

Joey Coleman (03:56):
Absolutely. And Dan and I were very intrigued by this story for a number of reasons which we’re going to get into, but we reached back out to Jeff to see if he could snag a photo of the insert card that he mentioned so that we could include it on the show notes at: experiencedthisshow.com, which by the way we did so you should go check it out at: experiencethisshow.com and Jeff later shared that he picked up some more Fretboard Coffee.

Joey Coleman (04:22):
That was a reminder for those of you that might be less musically inclined than others. The fret board is basically think of it as the strip of wood, where you put your fingers on a guitar, right, where you’re kind of pressing down different strings on the guitar to change the sound that’s the fret board or the fingerboard. Okay. So Jeff shared that he picked up some more Fretboard Coffee, but to his surprise, there was no song card. And Jeff was super bummed his words and decided to email the contact address on the website and the owner. Dave Elman emailed back very quickly. In fact, he replied in less than 30 minutes and here’s what the owner of fretboard coffee had to say:

Joey Coleman (05:01):
Hi Jeffrey, thanks for your email. It’s one of my favorite little touches and I’d love to keep it going. However, when the pandemic hit, we had to carefully consider every aspect of production. We decided to suspend the song cards as it was just one less thing to put into the coffee bags that could potentially introduce contamination. I realized that the risk is extremely small, but as a business, we’ve decided to take every precaution possible. We shut down to the public before it was mandated and we’ve had all staff in masks since far before it was required. Our shop is actually still closed to the public for now. We hope that we can bring the coffee cards back after things returned to normal. Please keep in touch and let us know if you have any other questions. Thanks Dave Elman owner and roaster at Fretboard Coffee.

Dan Gingiss (05:49):
Okay. First of all, you glossed over a little too quickly, the whole responded in 30 minutes thing. Cause that’s incredible. Especially the owner of the company. And I talk about being responsive all the time. I wrote about it in my first book. And it’s part of my whole theory on creating remarkable experiences is when people talk about you and they say nice things, or when they have questions or complaints, when you’re responsive, people remember that. And the fact that the owner responded in 30 minutes is incredible. And then I liked his answer too, right? It’s an honest answer. It is the, the move that they made was done for the safety of the customers. And so I read this note and I feel better about the coffee company, even though I might be missing one of my favorite aspects of it.

Joey Coleman (06:37):
Absolutely. And this is the fine line that so many businesses in the COVID era are walking. This idea that pieces of your business operations that are designed to create little touch points or little special experiences for your customers may have been called into questions, or maybe you can’t do them anymore because of the pandemic. And how are you navigating that? Now what’s interesting is Jeff – who submitted the story to us, let us know that he is pumped, that Dave will eventually bring the song card back. That being said, quote, “I appreciate his attention to the sensitivity around contamination and the effort to keep his employees and customers safe.” Now friends, let me point something out that Jeff shared that I think is the case with the majority of your customers. If you explain to them why you are doing things, and if it comes from a place of empathy and a place of consideration and care for either the customer or your employees or both, most customers will understand, most customers will say, wow, I know I’m not getting exactly what I used to get. And while that’s disappointing, thanks for making the right choice, even though it was the hard choice.

Dan Gingiss (07:54):
And I’ll add onto that, Joey, I believe firmly that right now and probably for the next six to 12 months, that safety is going to be one of the key words of customer experience. That if people don’t feel safe doing business with you, they’re going to go to your competitor. And so the fact that they’re doing this at the coffee shop to keep their customers safe and that Jeff, our listener understands that and appreciates that. I guarantee you makes him more loyal to the company and he’ll be there when they finally open up their doors again. And so safety is absolutely critical and I believe that’s going to continue even after the pandemic. I think all of us that used to laugh at call people germaphobes, we’re all germaphobes now. I don’t think the hand sanitizers going away just because the pandemic’s over, right? We’re going to want clean spaces. We’re not going to want contamination. And people are going to be more sensitive to it after going through this, this pandemic. So the safety thing is going to be a key component of the experience going forward.

Joey Coleman (09:04):
Dan, I couldn’t agree more. You know, I was doing a presentation for a group of executives the other day, and I was actually talking about Maslow’s hierarchy of needs. And at the risk of turning this into a psychology one Oh one class, most people in the business world have heard of Maslow’s hierarchy of needs. But if you haven’t, here’s a quick little refresher, it’s basically a pyramid. And the idea being as you get the needs at the base of the pyramid, you move up to the next level and then the next level. And then the next level on the top of the pyramid is something called self-actualization, which is what most businesses were offering pre-pandemic. They were offering you products and services that allowed you to create the best version of yourself. What we’ve been called to do now in a pandemic era is to go to the bottom of the pyramid: safety air, your personal security, your physiological safety, all of these elements that were prior to the pandemic, just basic Antioch up chips for human survival. That had been called into question. So I totally agree with you. Friends were at least six more months of this, if not a year of this, if not 18 more months of this, and I’m not saying of this being the full pandemic experience we’re having, but the impact that COVID-19 is having on business operations now at the risk of, you know, making this all about the pandemic, I do want to point out that Jeff shared a couple of other elements of the Fretboard experience that caught his attention and caught our attention as well. You get a free 12 ounce coffee when you purchase a bag of coffee. So when you go into the store and you buy the bag that they’re going to give you something to drink, to enjoy now so that they don’t delay the gratification until you go home and use the bag of coffee to make the coffee at home. The label that is written on the bag is handwritten as is the song card. So it has this personal touch. The espresso bar at their physical location is a beautiful giant wooden fret board. So they take the name of the brand and they’ve made it part of the fixtures in their location. And the shop is actually a garage, which makes you think about a garage band. So they are really living the experience in every touch point.

Dan Gingiss (11:20):
I love that. And it, again, that, you know, they’re appealing to obviously a certain population with that. But I think the idea of a consistent experience is one that we talk about. And it’s what defines a great customer experience. I usually use the word immersive, which is feeling the experience in your bones and understanding, and feeling that it’s consistent throughout. And so what I love is from start to finish that it’s a different kind of coffee shop that has created this immersive experience that is all around guitars and music. And I think that, you know, it is important to note that one of the key facets of that experience they had to eliminate they’ve obviously kept some of the others, but I think that this is why Jeff even noticed it, right? Because they’ve created something that is different and unique and immersive, and then when it goes away, people notice it. And so the learning here to me, one of the big learnings is that when you create an immersive experience, it is a great way for people to remember you. And we use the word remarkable here on the show all the time, meaning literally worthy of remark, because we want people to talk about your business in a positive way. And it certainly sounds like this place has done a great job of that.

Joey Coleman (12:43):
I couldn’t agree more, Dan, you know, and when we think of an immersive experience, how does our listener story from Jeff Robbins support that theory? Well, it’s the little things that matter. A small gesture employed by Fretboard Coffee, to insert a little card, telling people who purchased their coffee beans, what the roasters were listening to when making the product got Jeff’s attention. So he shared that with us, which led us to connect with Jeff, who then reconnected with Fretboard Coffee’s owner and all of this culminated in a story that we share with our listeners all over the world. Friends, we have two requests for you: number one, keep the stories coming, visit experience this show.com, navigate to the contact page, and then click on the orange button, labeled start recording, and you’ll be able to leave us a recording about some experience you’ve had. And hopefully we can play that in a future episode. And number two, if you love coffee and you want to support small businesses that are really doing their best to deliver remarkable experiences before, during, and after the COVID-19 pandemic, go to FretboardCoffee.com, that’s fretboard F R E T B O a R D coffee.com and order some coffee or some cool coffee, swag or something, help us support our listeners and their stories!

[SEGMENT INTRO – REDESIGN THE EXPERIENCE]
Joey Coleman (14:11):
With a pandemic, sweeping the globe and shifting the way organizations interact with their customers many of the old ways of operating just don’t work anymore. As we all navigate a COVID-19 world, it’s time to Redesign the Experience,

[REDESIGN THE EXPERIENCE][The Apple Mask]
Joey Coleman (14:30):
Out of curiosity Dan, how many masks would you say are in your regular rotation when you go out in public these days?

Dan Gingiss (14:38):
Oh, wow. I hadn’t actually thought of it that way. And I would say I’m not using it as a fashion statement, but I obviously have my Cubs mask. I mean, so clearly I got that one, but that one you got no, cause that’s kind of a cloth masks so I’m not enough super excited about how protective it actually is, but I have the KN95 for when I go to the grocery store, a place where I know there’s going to be a lot of people. And then I have kind of the disposable, you know, white or blue mask that, you know, I use once or twice and, and toss. But those are probably the three that you’ll see me rocking.

Joey Coleman (15:15):
Gotcha. Well, I’ve actually got four. I’ve got the N95, you know, that’s kind of the, Oh my goodness. And then I’ve got three cloth ones, a bright blue one, a dark blue one and a gray one. But after seeing a recent story on Bloomberg, I’m thinking I may need to track down another one. Now this story was all about the special face mask that Apple has designed for their employees to wear in both their corporate headquarters and their retail store environments. Now, because it’s a product designed by Apple. You can imagine there will be two key components.

Dan Gingiss (15:51):
I’m going with beautiful design and crazy prices.

Joey Coleman (15:56):
You know, Dan, you are half, right? If you go to the show notes at experience, this show.com, you can see some photos of an unboxing experience that an Apple employee shared on Twitter of all places. Ironically enough, I know, right. It was linked to in the article and I clicked through. But as you might imagine, it feels pretty familiar with the same white packaging and white product design. It’s very AirPods. So in that way, but that being said, you can’t purchase these masks. They’re only for Apple employees to wear while working at headquarters or working in their stores.

Dan Gingiss (16:34):
Well, of course I love that the company is paying attention to its employees and providing PPE to keep them safe. We know we’ve said before, we’ll say it again. Employee experience equals customer experience. If your employees are feeling safe, then they’re going to be able to make your customers feel safe. If your employees don’t feel safe, it’s a lot to ask them to try to make customers feel safe. So I love that Apple has gone above and beyond in typical Apple style and made this mask that I’m hoping you’re going to tell me at some point we can still get.

Joey Coleman (17:08):
Well, here’s the thing. We can’t get this one, but don’t worry. There’s, there’s good news at the end of the story. What I like about this is Apple did two things. Number one, you know, it’s Apple, right? So they require you to wear a uniform, which is basically a t-shirt. And I don’t know how often you go into the Apple store, damn, but the t-shirts kind of change. They’ve got different colors and different messages, and it’s all very branded and on brand in terms of the, the marketing messaging and the positioning. But I also like that they, you know, recognize that the mask has really become a fashion statement, not a fashion statement in the sense that as I alluded to at the beginning of the story, you’re picking what color you want to wear, but this idea that you’re wearing it and so they’re providing this for their employees. What I also loved about this is Apple in recent years has been making this big push towards being more sustainable and more environmentally conscious and what they did – and this was kind of a footnote in the article – but they actually work to find the appropriate materials that would filter the air while not disrupting supplies of medical, personal protective equipment. So they went out and they found materials that weren’t going to be used in the N95 mask and the masks that were used in hospital settings and instead identify different materials so they didn’t negatively impact the supply chain in the medical world, which I thought was, again, Apple kind of going above and beyond and thinking through these things.

Dan Gingiss (18:36):
Yeah, I really like that. And it’s kind of rare from a technology hardware company, right? That is using all sorts of materials that we don’t have any idea whether we can reuse or recycle or what they do to the earth. And so I like that in this particular case, they were thoughtful about that. And that has been, you know, one of the controversies that has come out of the pandemic is, as companies are trying to obtain PPE for their employees, certainly at different times in the last few months that may or may not have come at the expense of getting PPE to our frontline workers, who, and our medical workers who probably need it more. And it is a little bit of a disturbing trade-off. So I kind of liked that Apple sort of stepped aside and said, okay, we’re not going to get involved in that. We’re going to let all the, the PPE go to the first responders and we’re going to come up with a different way.

Joey Coleman (19:34):
I agree. And interestingly enough, earlier in the pandemic, Apple made a face shield for medical workers and distributed millions of other masks across the healthcare sector. They had a huge stockpile of masks that they had acquired over the years since their headquarters in California. And they were dealing with some air quality issues. So they actually are all about paying attention to these things. And so now they not only have these new face mask, but they’re also sourcing some clear masks.

Dan Gingiss (20:05):
And you’re about to tell us what a clear mask is, right?

Joey Coleman (20:08):
I am Dan, and this is where this story gets particularly interesting and takes it to another level. So the clear mask has all the properties of irregular protective face mask, but instead of covering the mouth with cloth, it has a clear shield that allows people to see the wearer’s full face. So people who are deaf or hard of hearing can understand better because they can read the lips. Now clear mask is the first fully transparent, FDA cleared mask, that is optimized for maximum clarity and Apple work with Gallaudet University in Washington, DC to identify solution, and then tested the clear mask with employees in their stores.

Dan Gingiss (20:52):
I love it. And as our listeners may recall, uh, we talked about a partnership between Starbucks and Gallaudet University back in episode 42, and Gallaudet specializes in educating the deaf and hard of hearing students. And it’s yet another example of a brand reaching out to the amazing educators at Gallaudet to help find creative solutions that work for every customer.

Joey Coleman (21:18):
Yeah. And you know, what’s interesting, Dan, I found that when I’m wearing a mask out in public, one of the things that is somewhat disconcerting is normally if I’m walking through a store, I would smile at the other people I’m walking by, you know, you make eye contact with someone and you express a smile or something just to be friendly. Well, when you’re wearing a mask, you can’t see that unless it’s a clear mask. So there’s the benefit for everyone wearing a clear mask. But there’s also the benefit for folks who maybe are having difficulty hearing folks. And I know I’ve certainly been in a situation where someone who’s wearing a mask is speaking to me. And it’s harder to hear what they’re saying because of the mask, the clear mask kind of solves for that problem.

Dan Gingiss (22:02):
Absolutely. And it is, I think one of the things that we’ve all missed in the last few months is that, you know, used to be that you would see somebody wearing a mask. And that was a different thing in the United States. I mean, obviously in Asian cultures, it’s been very common for a long time, but here in the US it wasn’t. And now we see them all the time. And one of the things that we’ve missed is you, you can’t see most of someone’s face, right? You, you can only read their eyes. You can’t read their whole facial expression. And certainly if you are needing to read lips or something in order to hear better, you’re, you’re kind of lost. So I think it’s a very interesting solution and I’m glad you found it.

Joey Coleman (22:42):
Well, friends, it would be great to be on the other side of this pandemic, but we’re not. And if you talk to medical professionals and look at the research globally, and that means going beyond your favorite news channel and actually exploring the global response to COVID-19, you’ll find a common thread among countries that have eliminated or dramatically reduced the COVID threat – their citizens wear masks whenever they leave their homes and interact with others in public and in the same way. So many people look to the example of Apple to model, surprise and delight for their customer experiences. Dan and I recommend that our listeners look to Apple again and see them as leading the way when it comes to mask, then go find some great mask solutions for yourself, for your team and your customers so we can all work together to eliminate this pandemic threat and get back to some really great customer experiences.

[PARTNERSHIP WITH AVTEX][Playing Experience Points – What Happened]
Joey Coleman (23:40):
You know, one of the best things about our new game show experience points is that we got to have a lot of fun creating the games that we play our partners at Avtex, who are also sponsors of the experience. This show, let us have a lot of free reign. And we collaborated together to come up with some interesting ways to talk about customer experience. So one of the games we created is called What Happened, and here’s how the game works:

Rules Hostess (24:11):
In what happened. Watch the first half of an experience story choose what you think happens next from four possible endings. And for correctly, for 500 points, if incorrect, you’ll be granted an extra life and the opportunity to answer from the remaining three endings for 250 points.

Dan Gingiss (24:32):
So I absolutely love this game because like our listeners story segment earlier on in this episode on experience, this, this is an opportunity for us to hear from other people about stories that they have had that are either good or bad customer experiences. And so they record videos for us and we get to hear their story, but only the first half of the story. And then there’s this whole mystery about what happens next and you and I got to have the fun of writing the four potential answers to what happened next.

Joey Coleman (25:07):
Absolutely. And what I love about the, the user generated listener generated stories is folks just so you know, Dan, and it was really just Dan. I think I did it once. Dan did it twice tweeted out, Hey, or, and did on Facebook and all the socials, you know, Hey, tell us your stories and here’s the rules. Tell us the first half, and then do a second video where you tell the second half, and we got dozens of submissions. And I think what it really proved is that everyone is having customer experiences, that they want to talk about. Whether those are the good experiences, the bad experiences, the ugly experiences, or the exceptional experiences, they want to share their story. And so not only is this a fun way to incorporate listener generated stories into the game, but it’s really interesting to see how many of our celebrity contestants and, oh, we’ve got an amazing lineup of celebrity customer experience experts, what they think the answers are because there’s that interesting dance between, well, what the answer should be versus what do you think actually happened.

Dan Gingiss (26:11):
or what I hope it would be? And that’s the fun, right? We often get the person cause they’re a lot of them have been involved in customer experience. They’re saying, well, gosh, I really hope that they took great care of them. And it was a fantastic experience. But this answer over here sounds so much more typical. And of course we’ve inserted that answer on purpose because it sounds typical. And I know we sound a little, like, what’s the word that I’m looking for here where we’re trying to trick people, but it’s really just, we’re trying to have, we’re trying to make customer experience fun. And I think we’ve really succeeded with this show.

Joey Coleman (26:45):
So friends, if you want to find out What Happened and not just the game, what happened, but also what happens in general on experience points, go check out the show. You can find this on YouTube. You can find us as a podcast. You can go to experience points, game that’s ExperiencePointsGame.com and see our celebrity contestants. See videos, listen to the game, come check it out. If you like the experience, this show sponsored by our great partners at Avtex. I think you’re really going to love experience points the game from our friends today.

[SEGMENT INTRO – CX PRESS]
Joey Coleman (27:24):
There are so many great customer experience articles to read, but who has the time we summarize them and offer clear takeaways you can implement starting tomorrow. Enjoy this segment of CX Press, where we read the articles so you don’t need to!

[CX PRESS][TikTok + DoggFace + Ocean Spray + Fleetwood Mac = Viral Video]
Joey Coleman (27:42):
Alright Dan, what do skateboarding, Fleetwood, Mac and ocean spray have in common?

Dan Gingiss (27:48):
Okay. I have no clue at all.

Joey Coleman (27:55):
I was actually hoping you would have no clue. I felt like there was a 50/50 chance here. You’re either going to know exactly what I was talking about, or you were going to have no idea what I was talking about. And I got to tell ya, I’m thrilled that it’s no idea.

Dan Gingiss (28:08):
I mean, obviously I know what those three things are separately, but I have no idea what they have in common, our audience.

Joey Coleman (28:15):
So, so let me explain a little bit about this. If folks haven’t had the chance to see this yet. So this is an evolving story in experience marketing, vitality and empathy, which you can read more about in the inc com article by Justin Brisso titled ocean spray just gave the viral skateboarding, TikTok guy, an extraordinary gift. It’s a lesson in emotional intelligence. Now here’s what happened a few weeks ago. Nathan “Dogface” Apadaca was on his way to the potato warehouse where.

Dan Gingiss (28:51):
hold on a minute.

Joey Coleman (28:53):
This is so great. There is so many fabulous pizza that says an actual story, an actual, honest to goodness story. And let me tell you, by the time I am done with this story, it is so beautifully surreal and fabulous that you couldn’t replicate it. And that’s part of the reason why it’s so incredible.

Dan Gingiss (29:10):
I just want to remind you though, before you go on that so far, you have mentioned the viral skateboarding, Tik TOK guy, some dude named dog face. And he was of course on his way to a potato warehouse.

Joey Coleman (29:22):
I know it’s just like this story. You would think I’m making it up. But folks, to my knowledge, every piece of this story is true. All right. So a few weeks ago, Nathan face Apodaca was on his way to the potato warehouse where he works in Idaho when his 2000 Dodge Durango gave out on him now, because he didn’t want to be late for work. Nathan grabbed his skateboard – or longboard for all of you, aficionados listening – and as he skated down the highway, he decided to film a quick video of himself, sipping on a big bottle of ocean spray, cranberry juice and lip sinking to the Fleetwood Mac classic Dreams. Now what happened after this (as if that wasn’t incredible enough) what happened after this is the video which he uploaded to TikTok went viral and it racked up millions of views. In fact, as we’re recording this right now, over 60.8 million views, people started filming their own recreations of the video, including Fleetwood Mac and all of this led to a ton of free advertising for ocean spray, because remember he’s drinking the Ocean Spray, cranberry juice, but instead of just saying, thanks or taking advantage of all this free press, the folks at Ocean Spray decided to do something special. So first they partnered with a local Nissan dealership to give Nathan a new and get this folks cranberry red Nissan Frontier pickup truck. It’s so good. And then they filled the cargo bed with jugs of cranberry juice. And there’s the ocean sprays CEO, Tom Hayes noted quote. When we saw Nathan’s video and the joy it created, we knew we needed to celebrate him and the happiness he spurred. We were humbled to gift him something of importance to him, a truck we knew he needed.

Dan Gingiss (31:23):
You know, I love this so much because earlier on in this season, Episode 106, for those scoring at home, you talked about a, another TicTok video about an employee from Chick-fil-a and Chick-fil-a’s response was not quite as positive as Ocean Sprays. And I think what’s great about this is that ocean spray could have just put on their marketing hats and tried to capitalize on the surprise virality, like so many other brands have done, but instead they showcased how brands could and frankly should use emotional intelligence to connect with their customers. And so, as it turns out in an early interview with TMZ, Nathan shared that his Durango while having over 330,000 miles on it just, and I quote, shuts off sometimes

Joey Coleman (32:18):
As, as vehicles that have over 330,000 miles are want to do sometimes, right? And so when it came time to acknowledge all this great free publicity ocean spray did more than say, thank you. They actually showed their thanks.

Dan Gingiss (32:35):
And this, similar to the Chik-fil-a story led to even more publicity, Nathan made a second video driving his new truck while, what do you think he was drinking Joey?

Joey Coleman (32:46):
That would be Ocean Spray cranberry juice.

Dan Gingiss (32:48):
That would be Ocean Spray cranberry juice. And that new video has already racked up as of this recording, nearly 28 million views.

Joey Coleman (32:59):
It’s insane. And to fully bring this story full circle, Ocean Spray’s CEO created his own version of the video in an effort to quote, keep the vibe going.

Dan Gingiss (33:12):
And I love that because there is nothing better than a CEO acting human, right? It is so true. I mean, we see these frankly, mostly guys, you know, dressed up in their suits in front of the microphone, doing a quarterly earnings statement, very serious. Exactly. And it’s very rare that you just see them in blue jeans or shorts, you know, being a person with their family. And, and I love, I mean, there are not a lot of CEOs that would have been bold enough to go and shoot their own video. Very few I’d say of the fortune 500, I dunno, less than 10, you think would probably be willing to do it.

Joey Coleman (33:55):
I was going to guess five, but definitely less than 10 because you run the risk of, you know, well, that’s not what we’re supposed to look like. And here’s the point – friends we’re living in an era where the more real you are, the more attention that garners. You know, I think we are hopefully knock on wood, moving beyond the era of everything being hyper scripted and PR you know, quaffed and, you know, figured out in a way that everybody’s like, Oh, here’s the prepared scene and the scripted move. It’s like, no even reality TV. People are getting bored with reality TV because they’ve come to realize that reality TV shows are scripted. And that’s what made this video so fascinating and what it made it stand out. Because, I mean, this is the guy who works at the potato warehouse, right. And he’s just shooting this video.

Dan Gingiss (34:51):
I so want some videos of the potato warehouse, cause I’m imagining right now. And I, I, I mean, it’s just great.

Joey Coleman (34:57):
Yeah, it’s great. And the, the ripple effect, no pun intended on this was crazy because Fleetwood Mac released to the song Dreams 43 years ago. And this week where we’re, when we’re recording dreams was number three on the billboard charts. Like this is the song that was popular 43 years ago. And people have heard it plenty since then, but it’s like, it just skyrocketed the popularity and Fleetwood Mac is like, you know, and they’ve done some interviews with him where he’s just, Oh my gosh, like, this is an amazing experience. And we love it. And we love the energy behind it. And it wasn’t done for commercial purposes and it wasn’t a scheme and it wasn’t to try to bring something back. It was pure fun and music and joy and skateboarding down the highway to get to work LA jug and, you know, while drinking a jug of ocean spray. I mean, it’s just everything about this was what viral videos in my opinion should be about.

Dan Gingiss (36:06):
Yeah, absolutely. And I have to say having two kids, one of whom is quite active on TikTok. It is amazing that one of the results of TikTok becoming popular is that my kids know music from many, many generations. And I there’s been several times where my son or daughter will start singing along to a classic rock song. And I’m like, where do you know this? From the answers TikTok, because a lot, because all these videos are set to music and, and somehow some way a song like Fleetwood, Mac’s just shows up. And now everybody knows that song. And it’s it’s number three 43 years after it’s released. I think that’s a good thing. And it’s one of the positives that I think that platform has brought to society.

Speaker 2 (36:52):
Well, and that may be the one of the first times that a parent has ever sung the praises of Tik TOK. I love it, Dan. And it’s so true. I mean, our youngest son who is four the other day, I saw him walk by the Alexa and he said, Alexa, play, I Love Rock and Rroll by Joan Jett and the Blackhearts. Right? And it’s like, how does he know this song was decades before he was born? And it’s the exposure to the music. It creates connection. It’s a nostalgia for the parents. I love every bit about it. So what can we learn about this example, this story? Well, we can learn that Joey’s actually doing a decent job staying up on the TikTok kids to Joey stories from social media. Okay. But seriously, what can we learn about the confluence of Nathan’s TikTok video and Fleetwood Mac’s playful participation and Ocean Spray’s empathetic gifting? Well, what we can learn is that people are thirsting for human connection. We love a feel-good fun, loving story. And while it’s impossible to know whether or not something is going to go viral, when we film it, our reaction afterwards is much easier to design. So look for opportunities to reward and acknowledge your advocates. If someone’s going to sing your praises, whether that’s figuratively or literally look for ways to thank them, that move the dial for them in the same way that they move the dial for you. Somebody leaves you a positive review on Amazon. Go thank them. Shout them out. Somebody kind enough to comment about you on social, acknowledge that and throw the gift back to them. So in the now famous words of Nathan dog face Apodaca, we can all just keep the vibe going.

Dan Gingiss (38:30):
And me? I’m going to get some cranberry juice.

[SHOW OUTRO]
Joey Coleman (38:38):
Wow. Thanks for joining us for another episode of Experience This!

Dan Gingiss (38:42):
We know there are tons of podcasts to listen, to magazines and books to read, reality TV to watch. We don’t take for granted that you’ve decided to spend some quality time listening to the two of us.

Joey Coleman (38:52):
We hope you enjoyed our discussions. And if you do, we’d love to hear about it. Come on over to ExperienceThis Show.com and let us know what segments you enjoyed, what new segments you’d like to hear. This show is all about experience, and we want you to be part of the Experience This Show.

Dan Gingiss (39:10):
Thanks again for your time. And we’ll see you next week for more

Joey Coleman (39:13):
Experience

Dan Gingiss (39:15):
This!

Episode 109 – Enhancing the Experience with Efficiency and Effectiveness

Join us as we discuss using technology to know where to go, the move to telemedicine during the pandemic, and a framework for creating more content than you could possibly want.

Signage, Appointments, and Creators– Oh My!

[This Just Happened] Traffic Lights in the Bathroom?!

Things We Mentioned in This Segment:

• Chris Strub – friend of the Experience This! Show and all-around great guy
Dallas Fort Worth International Airport (DFW)

[Redesign the Experience] A Doctor’s Visit Without a Waiting Room

Things We Mentioned in This Segment:

The Rise of Telemedicine During the COVID-19 Pandemic – by Dan Gingiss 

[Partnership with Avtex] Introducing the Experience Points Game Show!

Things We Mentioned in This Segment:

• Avtex
• Experience Points

[What Are You Reading?] Create Limitless Amounts of Content

Things We Mentioned in This Segment:

The Content Fuel Framework: How to Generate Unlimited Story Ideas – by Melanie Deziel

Host Contact Information

Email Dan: Dan@dangingiss.com

Tweet Dan Gingiss: @DGingiss

Email Joey: JoeyC@JoeyColeman.com

DanGingiss.com

JoeyColeman.com

Subscribe to Experience This on Apple Podcasts

Episode Transcript

Download an unedited transcript of Episode 109 here or read it below:

[SHOW INTRO]
Dan Gingiss (00:05):
Welcome to Experience This!

Joey Coleman (00:08):
Where you’ll find inspiring examples of customer experience, great stories of customer service, and tips on how to make your customers love you even more!

Dan Gingiss (00:18):
Always upbeat and definitely entertaining, customer retention expert Joey Coleman…

Joey Coleman (00:23):
and social media expert, Dan Gingiss – serve as your hosts for a weekly dose of positive customer experience.

Dan Gingiss (00:31):
So hold on to your headphones… It’s time to Experience This!

[EPISODE 109 INTRO]
Dan Gingiss (00:35):
Get ready for another episode of the Experience This! Show!

Joey Coleman (00:46):
Join us as we discuss using technology to solve an age old problem of knowing where to go, the move to telemedicine during the pandemic, and a framework for creating more content than you could possibly want.

Dan Gingiss (01:03):
Signage, appointments, and creators… Oh my!

[SEGMENT INTRO – THIS JUST HAPPENED]
Joey Coleman (01:09):
We love telling stories and sharing key insights you can implement – or avoid – based on our experiences. Can you believe that This Just Happened?!

[THIS JUST HAPPENED][Traffic Lights in the Bathroom?!]
Dan Gingiss (01:23):
So a good friend of mine, and friend of the Experience This! Show – Chris Strub – was actually traveling recently, he’s one of my few friends to be traveling, he has been going around to a few places to do his Giving Days that he hosts to raise money for charity. And he was walking through the Dallas Fort Worth airport. And I was pleased that he thought of me, maybe us, if you will, possibly…

Joey Coleman (01:49):
Well, let’s be honest, it was you – Strub! I’m taking this personally. I know Strub too, but no, no, no – I’m going to save my remarks… Go ahead, Dan!

Dan Gingiss (01:57):
Anyway, he thought of me and decided to tweet at me and said, “Never in the history of Twitter has a tweet been more likely to appear in a future @dgingiss CX keynote, then this bit of scatalogical brilliance” and he had a laugh out loud emoji. He then included three pictures, which I want to describe to our audience because I think he might be right now.

Joey Coleman (02:26):
Now before we describe them to the audience, Strub, I’m gonna forgive you for not including me in this tweet – he knows us well enough to know that I’m not on the Twitters. So, but thanks for getting it towards us. Yes, it probably will show up in a Dan Gingiss CX keynote but guess what, buddy, it’s showing up on the Experience This! Show as well!.

Dan Gingiss (02:45):
Exactly. So when you pass by the restrooms at Dallas Fort Worth Airport, you’re greeted with a, what looks like a pretty big, maybe 32″ television screen turned on its side, so it’s vertical.

Joey Coleman (03:02):
It’s a giant iPad!

Dan Gingiss (03:04):
Well, huge! Anyway, there’s one for men and one for women – as indicated by the internationally well-known man and woman signs. And it notes how many stalls are available in the bathroom, and how long it will take to walk to the next bathroom. And in the examples that he showed us, it just so happens, that there were four stalls available in the men’s room and two in the women’s room – which sounds about right, because you know, it’s always a, a longer wait for the women’s room, but then when you walk in, there are lights that are above each one of the stalls that are either green or red – to tell you which ones are occupied and which ones aren’t. And it kind of reminds me, I’ve seen those at parking garages before, but I’ve never seen one in a bathroom. And I thought it was pretty cool. So I appreciated him sharing it. What did you think Mr. Coleman?

Joey Coleman (04:02):
You know, it wouldn’t be a “Dan Gingiss episode” of Experience This if we didn’t have some mention of course, across the season, of a bathroom experience. So thank you, Chris Strub for pointing Dan in the direction so we could have the Season Six bathroom experience story!

Dan Gingiss (04:21):
Wait a minute, are you saying this just because I have not one, not two, but potentially three different bathroom stories that I tell in my keynotes?

Joey Coleman (04:29):
You know, let’s just say it’s clear that the bathroom experience is part of the experience and you stumble across a lot of remarkable ones. I actually found this one to be fairly remarkable for a couple reasons. Number one – when you are using the bathroom, the idea of someone knocking on the door is not super exciting. When you are using a bathroom in an airport, there are people that are trying to quickly use the bathroom and move on to their flight, so speed is probably at a more, a higher premium, in a bathroom setting in an airport then maybe in any other type of bathroom. And so the fact that they have almost a traffic light system of like, “Hey, you’re good to go on this one, not to go on that one,” I actually thought was pretty creative and it kind of speaks to something we talk a lot about on the show, which is – thinking about how you can deliver convenience to your customers. Now, in this case, the customer is the person needing to use the restroom. And obviously the organization is the Dallas Airport and they’ve made a technology investment to help move things along. What I also loved – the green and red lights, that was great – but I also loved the arrow pointing you in the direction of the next closest bathroom and telling you how long it would take you to walk there. Because especially if you’ve not been to an airport before, one of the things you’re often wondering like, well, if I don’t use this one, how far do I have to go? Is it before my gate? Or is it after my next gate? And am I going to have to walk past it? Et cetera. There’s a lot of stuff that’s going on and I think in a world where travel, as a general premise for many people, is a stressful experience, anything you can do to increase the convenience and the ease for your customers – while they’re already in a heightened, stressful state – is going to be a good thing.

Dan Gingiss (06:21):
Yeah. What I thought was interesting here was this seemed to be a combination of things that we’ve seen in other places. So I mentioned that I had seen it, and I’m sure you have too, in parking garages – which is a nice touch to tell you, “Hey, this parking garage is full” or “it has only three more spaces left.” And then there’s the lights over the different parking stalls to tell you which are available and which aren’t we also talked about. And you’re going to be very disappointed with Rain Man because I can’t find the episode in my brain, but we did an episode.

Joey Coleman (06:53):
Hang on ladies and gentlemen, I have to pick myself back up, I just fell over. Dan Gingiss is about to reference a past episode of Experience This! and he doesn’t know the call sign number. Hopefully some of you remember the episode number and can write in and let us know what it was.

Dan Gingiss (07:07):
Yes. Well, it was the episode where we talked about, I believe it was an entire episode about our experiences in London, I think? Or did we do one about, there was one where we did an international episode and in all of the experiences were about traveling… You had a massage and a haircut…

Joey Coleman (07:26):
It was in London, in the Heathrow Airport, yes!

Dan Gingiss (07:27):
So in that same episode, we also talked about how there were signs for security that told you how long each of the lines had to wait. So if you went to the South Security, it was a 15 minute wait, but the North Security only had 10 minute wait or something like that, and we thought that was really cool. So we’ve seen the kind of “how long you have to wait” thing in other places as well and then also, when you walk through an airport, you often see the signs that say “Next Eating Area – three minutes walk,” or it’ll show you all of the restaurants and how long it takes to walk there, and so I liked – as you pointed out – the little arrow that kinda said, “well, you can, uh, you know, you can wait for two more minutes and walk to the next one. Even better might’ve been to say that the next one had more stalls available, right? Because if you took the walk and then, and then it was busier, it might be frustrating…

Joey Coleman (08:24):
So true. So true, huge opportunity for the upgrade in the experience there, which I think brings up an interesting point Dan. The best experiences around, in many ways, are pirated from other industries and brought in your industry. And it’s one of the reasons why we decided when we created the Experience This! Show to talk about every possible industry under the sun, because our hope is that our listeners can hear one story and say, “that’s not my industry, but I could do something similar in my industry and it would stand out, it would be remarkable, it would be different!” And I agree with you giving someone a preview of what they might find when they make that walk, would be a great way to make it even more beneficial to the person looking at the sign.

Dan Gingiss (09:09):
So I think that’s a great segue to the takeaway here, which is, look, you may not even have bathrooms because you may be a completely digital business. So it’s not about the bathrooms. It’s about giving customers the information that they need to make the decisions that they need to make. And in this particular case, it has to do with, am I going to go to the bathroom now? Or am I going to walk further to another one? But the indicators, the signage, and the indicators, and the technology that’s used to track that, can be used in lots of other different places. And I urge you to think in your business of where your customers may be waiting, or may have to make a decision, that you can help them by just providing them with a little bit more information.

[SEGMENT INTRO – REDESIGN THE EXPERIENCE]
Joey Coleman (09:53):
With a pandemic sweeping the globe and shifting the way organizations interact with their customers, many of the old ways of operating just don’t work anymore. As we all navigate a COVID-19 world, it’s time to Redesign the Experience.

[REDESIGN THE EXPERIENCE][A Doctor’s Visit Without a Waiting Room]
Dan Gingiss (10:12):
Amid a global pandemic and stay at home orders in almost every state, most businesses have had to pivot to a virtual existence. Now in a healthcare industry, this means a much higher dependence on telemedicine, which is also called tele- health in some spaces. And that has both doctors and patients adapting. Doctors, therapists, dentists, even veterinarians, have shifted appointments to virtual settings as a means to triage health issues and provide non-emergency care to patients. Now I wrote about this in a blog for our friends and sponsors of the Experience This! Show – Avtex – and thought that we should also talk about it here on the Experience This! Show, because I found it to be a really interesting dynamic that has evolved out of the pandemic, that I think has a lot of impact both within the healthcare industry, of course, but also to businesses outside it.

Joey Coleman (11:12):
Well, and at the risk of, you know, putting the cart before the horse – or what’s the opposite of burying the lead? the reveal? – this may be something that is good, that has come from the pandemic. I mean, I don’t want to give away kind of where we’re taking the conversation, but I generally think this shift is a positive one.

Dan Gingiss (11:31):
Well, yeah. And we’ve talked about that several times this season that some of the changes that we’ve seen during COVID are (a) going to become permanent and (b) are positive improvements. And so if there is a silver lining to what has been a pretty lousy experience overall for everybody over the last six/seven months is that there are some positive experiences – customer experience or in this case, patient experience – coming out of it. So as I started investigating this, I did an informal survey of my friends and connections on Facebook. And I just asked people, “Have you used telemedicine? And if so, where?” And I was amazed at the results! People came back and said that they had virtual appointments with allergists, behavioral therapists, dermatologists, ears, nose, and throat doctors, mental health professionals, occupational therapists, ophthalmologists, orthopedists, physical therapists, neurosurgeons, and of course, their primary care provider.

Joey Coleman (12:27):
Well, I don’t know if this means that you have a lot of friends on Facebook, Dan, or if your friends have got some serious health issues! Are they just sickly folks?! No, I think, I think it’s probably the former (obviously I’m being facetious) but I think what’s fascinating here is we’ve got a lot of different types of medicine that I would posit prior to March or April of this year, people hadn’t considered that telehealth or the telemedicine solution, or if they had wanted that their provider didn’t offer it. I

mean, I shared earlier in the season – and I’ll steal one from you, Dan, I think it was Episode 103 – my wife’s experience with the eye doctor and being able to snap a photo of her eye and text it to the eye doctor and say, “Hey, what is this? What’s going on?” And the doctor being able to say, “Hey, guess what? It’s okay, it’s fine. It’s, you know, it’ll resolve itself in a week or so. And if it doesn’t let me know and you can come in and see me.” But just that ability to immediately get an expert assessment of the situation – without needing to get in the car and drive there, without needing to make an appointment, without needing to run the risk of exposing ourselves or the providers to COVID. I mean, the convenience alone is incredibly valuable…

Dan Gingiss (13:44):
It’s something you’d be willing to pay for in the future…

Joey Coleman (13:47):
100%! Let me tell you, I actually texted the provider afterwards and I said, “Send me a bill. Seriously!” And he was like, “No, Joey, it’s all good. We’ve been your eye doctor for years. Don’t sweat it. We’ll see you next time we see you for your regular annual checkup,” but it was so convenient that I found myself compelled as a patient or as a customer to say, “just bill me,” because I really appreciated the speedy response time.

Dan Gingiss (14:13):
Well, and you’re right, that a lot of these types of doctors have had to move here very quickly. I talked to someone who worked for a large, multi-state dermatology practice, and he told me that just in his organization, they saw telemedicine appointments jump from 10 to 20 per month before the pandemic, to more than 500 per day after the pandemic started.

Joey Coleman (14:41):
That, that’s like, that’s not even hockey stick growth… That’s rocket ship growth!

Dan Gingiss (14:44):
That is rocket ship growth.

Joey Coleman (14:47):
The crazy thing is, when that happens, it really pushes the bounds of the tech team who’s helping provide that. You know, I actually was talking to somebody who oversees technology for a major hospital provider and they had kind of a similar assessment and the way he described it, is he said, “Joey – we took our next six years of plans for rolling out telehealth and telemedicine and we implemented them in under 90 days.” And what this meant is his team was just slammed, and working, and to be candid – and I won’t mention any names – he said the hardest part was getting the doctors on board. The patients were ready, the patients were excited and like, didn’t need a lot of explanation. It was convincing the doctors that the image they had of themselves as being the kind of person who has people in, who have people in the waiting room, waiting them to see them could be sacrificed for speed, efficiency, safety, ease of use, a seamless experience, et cetera. Like all the benefits, but maybe a little bit of the less of the status or, you know, or at least that’s the way it was perceived in, uh, in his medical community he was working with.

Dan Gingiss (16:03):
It’s an interesting perspective that I hadn’t really thought of… But the folks that I talked to – and I talked to doctors, dentists, and even a veterinarian, two veterinarians actually – and they all reported positive patient experiences, which obviously is why we’re talking about it. But most importantly, they also reported successful clinical outcomes. So what that means is patients are getting their problems solved, like your wife did with her eye via telemedicine, it’s convenient, it’s fast, and it is been a really good experience – both from the clinical side and from the patient experience side. So I think it’s fascinating. And I mean, I was talking to my friend, who’s a veterinarian and I’m like, “How does this even work? Your patient can’t talk!”

Joey Coleman (16:54):
Right? It’s like, you know, “Buffy, what’s wrong with you? Bark girl! Bark!” You know, I mean, it’s, it’s, it’s a challenging concept, but let’s be honest, I think it’s the reality. I mean, I’ve got to ask you, Dan, what, what do you think? I mean, do you think this is a trend that is going to move from being a trend to being the reality that it’s here to stay? Or is this just kind of a COVID-era novelty or anomaly?

Dan Gingiss (17:19):
Well, I think this is a great question and I actually did ask, uh, both a doctor, friend and a vet friend. And before I tell you what they say, I thought it’d be fun, joy if you, and I just kind of volley back and forth a little bit on some of the advantages of telehealth or telemedicine of which I think there are many. And also, let’s just be honest with our audience. There are some disadvantages too, and maybe those are things that end up getting fixed. Maybe they’re not, but we’re still kind of early days here. So, you know, when to, off on the advantages, we talked about convenience. So I think that is really an obvious one. There’s also this issue of accessibility, which I thought was really interesting. And that might be for patients that want to visit a doctor in another state that they maybe wouldn’t have had access to before. Maybe there’s a specialist or something like that. And I thought that was kind of interesting that I, that I hadn’t thought about. And relatedly is there are different communities in particular, I would say the elderly community, which sometimes has difficulty obtaining transportation to a doctor’s appointment. And now that becomes completely unnecessary. And so that becomes more accessible for them as well.

Joey Coleman (18:32):
Oh, Dan, I totally agree with you and I’ll take it one step further. You know, what about those who are, you know, not in a position to have their own vehicle, right? So that they’re, they’re run into transportation concerns and they’re used to taking the bus and they may have to take a bus for four hours to get from one side of town, to the other, jumping from bus to bus, to bus, to get to a medical provider. It’s easier just not to go. And what’s fascinating is when we think of telemedicine, you know what originally came out of the idea of doing these things over the phone? Well, the reality is more Americans and more people globally are walking around with their phone in their pocket or in their purse today than at any other time in human history. And the reach, if you will, of a cell phones into lower economic communities is much higher than one might otherwise expect. So there is a huge access piece of this that comes along. This isn’t only good for the patients though. This is good for the doctors. I mean, there’s a much higher efficiency and seamlessness that they can move through the potential revenue for a doctor increases dramatically. Because if you think about just even if you’re a non doctor and you think how now in the COVID era, you jump from Zoom call to Zoom to Zoom call, and you might crank out four calls where if you were getting in the car and going around and doing sales appointments or marketing calls or whatever it may be or visits, you know, it would take you a day. You can do four before lunch. And I think doctors, it’s the same thing. They can be much more efficient and increase the number of patients that they interact with in a given time period.

Dan Gingiss (20:03):
You know, I love that you said that Joey, because, uh, one of the things that I talked about in my book was about how Uber solved the problem for both passengers and for drivers. And that’s why it was so successful in, in disrupting. And I think you’re absolutely right here and I’ll go one step further that besides from helping patients and helping doctors get also helps the system because it reduces unnecessary visits for non-emergencies, right? You have people that go to the doctor or go or worse, go to the emergency room for things that they don’t really need to. And that then by reducing those, that frees up those resources for the people who really need them who are really experiencing an emergency. So whenever you have a situation where basically it’s a win, win, win, that is generally the kind of disruption that is going to last. And that I think generally we now welcome.

Joey Coleman (20:58):
Absolutely. And I mean, let’s be honest that the ER piece of this is huge. If you look at the amount of emergency room visits that are for things that are not emergencies, and that’s either because they’re dealing with a patient who’s uninsured or under insured, or doesn’t have a primary care physician, or doesn’t feel that they can make their schedule work to get an appointment three weeks from now. So they just go into the ER, whenever it’s available. I mean, this led to the proliferation of urgent care centers. But I think when we think about telemedicine and telehealth, that takes it to an entirely different level. It’s like, you know, the age old, a TV ad. If you have a phone, you have a lawyer. It’s like, if you have a phone, you have a doctor. And I think that’s actually better for our society than if you have a phone, you have a lawyer.

Dan Gingiss (21:46):
Sure, exactly. So quickly let’s cover a couple of the disadvantages because there definitely are some. You pointed out one, I think earlier, which is that there is a cost to doctors or hospitals for purchasing new equipment, integrating technology into existing systems, making ensuring privacy and security training doctors and staff. So, you know, while a lot of organizations have been able to stand this up really, really quickly, it is not without expense, both dollars and time resources.

Joey Coleman (22:21):
Well, and this is a, you know, just as a little aside, you know, one of the challenges that exist in a lot of hospitals today is the confluence between HIPAA (the major regulation here in the United States around healthcare privacy) and technology. And interestingly enough, one of the ways that shows up is if you have a computer screen in the office where there are going to be patients or other people, it is set to log out or to force you to type in your name and password on a much faster rate than the typical computer you use in an office setting. So there there’s, you know, kind of, for lack of a better way of putting it behavioral challenges that have to be adopted as well. And, you know, I mentioned the lawyers in the last comment and I say this as a recovering lawyer, we’re going to need a dramatic rewrite of most of the laws as it relates to healthcare and privacy if we are going to make the move to telemedicine that I think most patients want to move to. And I think most doctors probably as well, another challenge, I think that ties into this, that I alluded to earlier with, you know, the veterinarian scenario is not being able to examine patients physically. I don’t know about you Dan, but there’s plenty of times where I go into the doctor where it’s not enough to say, Hey doc, what does this look like to you? Right. They’re poking it. They’re prodding it. They’re doing there. You know, there there’s more physical interaction than would be available over a screen call.

Dan Gingiss (23:53):
Oh, absolutely. For sure. And, and there, I mean, just like any experience, nothing replaces being there in person, and there are definitely going to be health issues in which you have to do that. It’s interesting that you mentioned HIPAA. I am one of the few people in the world that has actually read that entire privacy policy.

Joey Coleman (24:12):
I’m sorry, Dan, we got to get you a better life.

Dan Gingiss (24:15):
I know it’s tough, but it’s just a fun fact about it. It also doesn’t even mention social media and has not been updated since the advent of social media. So when you talk about technology, I mean, social media now is, I don’t know how many years old, but let’s call it North of 10 and there are no rules around this. And so as we continue to build on the technology and now we’ve got tele medicine, at some point, this stuff is going to have to be updated,

Joey Coleman (24:42):
Not to mention the number of people who happily violate their own privacy. As it relates to health care all day, every day. If I had a dollar for every time, I saw somebody on Facebook post a photo of some rash or bruise and say, Hey, does anybody have a guess what this is? And I’m just like, you’re going to crowd source via Facebook, an assessment of a medical issue. And invariably, you know, there’ll be some picture of somebody and it just looks terrible and nasty and oozing puss and it’s bad. And people are chiming in like, go see a doctor, stop asking your ex boyfriend from high school, for his opinion about what this is, unless that person happens to be a medical professional, don’t do it. So, yeah, there’s definitely a lot of downsides, but I think the interesting thing is we could have made this an Agree to Disagree episode, but I be willing to bet that the problem was we would have both ended up in the same camp, which is we agree that telehealth is a good thing. We agree that it is a silver lining from the COVID pandemic experience. And we think it’s here to stay.

Dan Gingiss (25:47):
I totally agree. And back to the doctor and the vet that I talked to, so the doctor said, and I’m quoting, “I think telemedicine will stay with us in one form or another after the pandemic. So it makes sense to figure out how to integrate it, to improve patient care and access.” And then the veterinarian who, by the way said that one of the downfalls was, was patient’s expecting that he always be available. And he referred to that. I thought this was brilliant as “being on a leash”,

Joey Coleman (26:18):
Ladies and gentlemen, he’s here all week!

Dan Gingiss (26:19):
Yeah, it was awesome. Anyway, he said, and I quote, “This is not going away. Just like most advances in technology and our civilization. It’s only going to become more and more incorporated into our life because of technology because of convenience and because of cost. These are things that the general public wants.”

Joey Coleman (26:37):
Well, ladies and gentlemen, boys, and girls there, you have it, Dan and I, we choose to agree to agree and advise all of our listeners to consider what parts of your pandemic experience will continue when the crisis is behind us. What have you done in your business to adapt to this world where we want to do more things online versus offline, and how are you making the investments that are going to continue those type of offerings going forward? Maybe the silver lining in all of this is that as we’ve all been pushed online, some experiences like going to the Dr. May have actually gotten better and may have actually improved for good and for good. I mean, not only for our personal good, but for the longterm as well.

[PARTNERSHIP WITH AVTEX][Introducing The Experience Points Game Show]
Dan Gingiss (27:32):
Hey, everyone for this entire season, you’ve been hearing Joey and I talk about this great new project that we’re working on with our friends at Avtex. It is called the Experience Points Game Show, and it is now available for you to watch or listen to… now! We are so excited. Please go to ExperiencePointsGame.com for more information. And here is an exclusive preview:

Multiple Voices (27:54):
I’m going to say what a moment of magic. My mom is an English teacher. I’ve written six books. I’m like, no, can’t do it because we will celebrate it over and over again on the way we need them to feel. If I take care of my team, they’ll take care of the customer. B2B companies report is the number one challenge, the customer experience. That was so hard. That’s the difference. The analogy worked. The speech did not a lot of tacos. Show me the money. Let’s win some money. This is so cool. And I’m learning so much. I think that’s powerful to say our customers are expecting more than ever before. I am still ready. There’s no way. There’s no way I’m going to guess. 44% hundred dollars per Dan Gingiss.

[SEGMENT INTRO – WHAT ARE YOU READING?]
Joey Coleman (28:49):
We spend hours and hours, nose deep in books. We believe that everything you read influence, it says the experiences you create. We’re happy to answer our favorite question. What are you reading?

[WHAT ARE YOU READING][The Content Fuel Framework by Melanie Deziel]
Dan Gingiss (29:02):
Many of us, whether we are solopreneurs or employees at companies have become content creators. I personally have been doing it for quite a long time. Starting with writing more than 250 articles for my college newspaper, the daily, Pennsylvania, and today, just between the two of us, Joey, we have this podcast and a video series that we’re doing for our

friends at Aztecs. I have a weekly live video series that you are a guest on. We both blog. We deliver keynotes. We’ve written books. It’s a lot of content.

Joey Coleman (29:39):
It’s a lot of content. And I don’t know that I’ve ever thought of all the different ways we’re creating content, but you’re absolutely right. I mean, it seems like every day I’m busy designing new slides, or writing something new for others to consume, or shooting a little video, or even something as simple as an email or a status update or a text message or a tweet – okay, just kidding. I’m not tweeting, but you are Dan. You’re tweeting enough for both of us. And you know, let’s be honest, we’re here on episode 109 of the Experience This Show. And we’re still creating new content every single week.

Dan Gingiss (30:14):
Yeah, no kidding. I’m still stunned about that. And I do think I speak for both of us when I say that we actually believe the show has gotten better as it’s gone along.

Joey Coleman (30:23):
At least that’s the hope right listeners? That is the hope. Is that like a fine wine we’re improving with age?

Dan Gingiss (30:29):
Exactly. So we also both know that content can be in the form of marketing frequently asked questions, blogs, product information, or really anything else. It’s always an important part of the experience. And often prospects will consume many, many pages of a website, for example, before deciding to do business with a new company. So that’s why I was interested in my friend, Melanie Deziel’s new book, The Content Fuel Framework: How to Generate Unlimited Story Ideas.

Joey Coleman (31:01):
Wait a minute. Did you say unlimited Dan?

Dan Gingiss (31:04):
I did Joey. And what I love about this book is that the framework is so darn simple. Here’s Melanie to tell us a little bit more about it.

Melanie Deziel (31:14):
I’m Melanie diesel, the chief content officer of story fuel and author of the content fuel framework, how to generate unlimited story ideas. The content field framework is a book for creators and marketers of any kind who have found themselves southernly needing to come up with tons of content ideas when maybe they didn’t have the training to do that. I use my background as a journalist to share my framework for how you can come up with an unlimited number of story ideas. The framework is simple and easy to use, and it’s made up of just two things. The focus, what is your content about and the format? How do you bring that content to life? The book is packed with tons of examples. It gives 10 different focuses you should consider and 10 different formats to start you off. In each chapter of this. Easy to read book has tons of examples showing you how this would come to life for businesses and solopreneurs of all types. My goal with the book is that if you read it – and I promise it’s a quick and easy read – you will find that you have a deep well of creativity inside of you. That you can activate whenever you need. Whenever you need something to post on your blog, to share on your social media platforms, a new video, you need to create a campaign you need to plan for a client… It doesn’t matter what you’re creating content for or why it only matters that you understand you have the tools you need to come up with content ideas. Whenever you need to. The book is, as I promise, an easy read and it’s packed with useful information prompts and all kinds of helpful resources and tips to help you get started. I really believe that if you read this book, you can go ahead and create hundreds. If not thousands of content ideas at the drop of a hat whenever you need to. So if that’s something that would benefit you and your business, please check out The Content Fuel Framework: How to Generate Unlimited Story Ideas by Melanie Deziel.

Dan Gingiss (33:08):
So, as Melanie mentioned, the framework has 10 focuses, which are people, basics, details, history, process, curation, data, product, examples, and opinions, and also 10 formats, which are writing infographics, audio, video, live video image, galleries, timelines, quizzes, tools, and maps. And her book walks through all of the focuses and all of the formats and shows real examples of content in action for each.

Joey Coleman (33:40):
That’s a whole lot of content options and a whole lot of categories and what I really liked was audio format. Since after all we’re recording a podcast right now, Melanie says that one of the advantages of audio content is that it can be consumed while the audience is using their eyes and hands for other activities. When content is audio only, this means that you, as the creator or storyteller can tap into time when your audience would otherwise not be consuming content while they’re working out at the gym, while they’re walking the dog, getting ready for work, washing dishes, which by the way, that’s my favorite one folks) or on their daily commute.

Dan Gingiss (34:19):
I’m wondering how many listeners ears perked up right now? Because you just said what it was that they were doing.

Joey Coleman (34:27):
Literally, we probably just described what you were doing. You know, we didn’t say sitting in a chair, just listening to the melodic tones of our voices talking about customer experiences. No, you’re probably doing something else. You’re multitasking, but this is kind of the good multitasking in that you can learn while your body’s doing, more rote activities.

Dan Gingiss (34:47):
Exactly. I also liked that Melanie used some of the less obvious formats and talked about timelines and quizzes and maps and that sort of thing. And that got me thinking differently because usually when I start to write a blog or a podcast segment, I just do it when an idea pops into my head or when I have a real life experience, I haven’t ever really thought of it this strategically before by combining that focus and that format. So check out Melanie Deziel’s book, The Content Fuel Framework: How to Generate Unlimited Story Ideas and never struggle to create content for your prospects and customers again.

[SHOW OUTRO]
Joey Coleman (35:33):
Wow. Thanks for joining us for another episode of Experience This!

Dan Gingiss (35:37):
We know there are tons of podcasts to listen to, magazines and books to read, reality TV, to watch! We don’t take for granted that you’ve decided to spend some quality time listening to the two of us.

Joey Coleman (35:47):
We hope you enjoyed our discussions. And if you do, we’d love to hear about it. Come on over to ExperienceThisShow.com and let us know what segments you enjoyed, what new segments you’d like to hear. This show is all about experience, and we want you to be part of the Experience This! Show.

Dan Gingiss (36:04):
Thanks again for your time, and we’ll see you next week for more

Joey Coleman (36:08):
Experience

Dan Gingiss (36:08):
This!

Episode 105 – Redesign Your Experiences to Acknowledge the “New Normal”

Join us as we discuss working from home – from a coffee shop, creative evolution to the classroom experience, and how “not juice” became a hit for a juice company

[Redesigning the Experience] Virtual Backgrounds, Live “From” Starbucks

Things We Mentioned in This Segment:

Starbucks
Virtual backgrounds from Starbucks
Zoom
Charles Schwab
Experience This Show – Episode #94

[Redesigning the Experience] Creative Classroom Creations in the COVID-era

Things We Mentioned in This Segment:

Two Florida teachers turned their students’ desks into little Jeeps to make social distancing less scary
St. Barnabas Episcopal School
Jeep
• Steve Weaver

[Partnership with Avtex] Announcing Experience Points!

Things We Mentioned in This Segment:

Avtex
• Experience Points
• Rohit Bhargava
• Jay Baer
Neen James
• Marquesa Pettway
Jesse Cole

[Redesigning the Experience] Repacking a Children’s Classic Drink to Help Kids Stay Safe

Things We Mentioned in This Segment:

• Capri Sun
• Water for Schools promo video

Host Contact Information

Email Dan: Dan@dangingiss.com

Tweet Dan Gingiss: @DGingiss

Email Joey: JoeyC@JoeyColeman.com

DanGingiss.com

JoeyColeman.com

Subscribe to Experience This on Apple Podcasts

Episode Transcript

Download a transcript of Episode 105 here or read it below:

[SHOW INTRO]

Dan Gingiss [00:00:05] Welcome to Experience This! 

Joey Coleman [00:00:08] Where you’ll find inspiring examples of customer experience, great stories of customer service, and tips on how to make your customers love you even more! 

Dan Gingiss [00:00:18] Always upbeat and definitely entertaining, customer retention expert Joey Coleman… 

Joey Coleman [00:00:23] …and social media expert Dan Gingiss serve as your hosts for a weekly dose of positive customer experience. 

Dan Gingiss [00:00:31] So hold on to your headphones, it’s time to Experience This!

[EPISODE 105 INTRO]
Dan Gingiss (00:40):
Get ready for another episode of the Experience This Show!

Joey Coleman (00:45):
Join us as we discuss how to work from home – from a coffee shop, creative evolution to the classroom experience, and how “not juice” became a hit for a juice company.

Dan Gingiss (00:59):
Caffeinating, protecting, and hydrating, Oh my!

[SEGMENT INTRO – REDESIGNING THE EXPERIENCE]

Joey Coleman (01:07):
With a pandemic sweeping the globe and shifting the way organizations interact with their customers, many of the old ways of operating just don’t work anymore. As we all navigate a COVID-19 world, it’s time to Redesign the Experience.

[REDESIGNING THE EXPERIENCE] Virtual Backgrounds, Live “From” Starbucks

Joey Coleman (01:26):
Friends… it has been a crazy few months to say the least. And as Dan and I thought about this season and how we might address the elephant in the room that is COVID-19 and the impact it has had on customer and employee experiences around the world, we realized that it made sense to create a special segment of our show that’s all about Redesigning the Experience in light of COVID-19.

Dan Gingiss (01:54):
And the idea here is that COVID-19, while a horrible pandemic and one that affected people in lots of terrible ways, has actually also evoked some customer experience changes that we think are going to be around for a long time after the pandemic is done. And a lot of those changes are actually good. And so, since we love talking about positive experiences, we felt like we needed to frame it in such a way to say, “Hey! This is a story that we’re telling you because it’s new since the pandemic and because of the pandemic.” And in fact, we decided that this episode, because we introduced this new segment (we’re so excited to bring it to you), we’re actually going to do three segments that are all Redesigning the Experience. We hope you enjoy it and as always, let us know if you have any comments or feedback.

Dan Gingiss (02:49):
With so much confusion about restaurants and retailers closing, and then reopening, and then maybe re-closing, it’s difficult for these industries to stay top of mind with customers. And companies across industries have been challenged with how to talk about COVID-19 without pandering, or repeating what’s already been said a hundred times.

Joey Coleman (03:14):
Oh, you mean like telling us about your “enhanced cleaning procedures?”

Dan Gingiss (03:19):
Exactly. You know, they were all enhanced. They weren’t better, or improved…

Joey Coleman (03:22):
All of them – just enhanced! Lots of enhanced cleaning… everywhere!

Dan Gingiss (03:27):
Yeah. So the coffee and dare I say marketing pioneers at Starbucks recently sent an email to customers offering a unique resource that is perfectly applicable to today’s stay at home world: downloadable, virtual backgrounds, featuring real Starbucks stores. So in other words, you can attend your next Zoom meeting looking like you’re sitting at a Starbucks!

Joey Coleman (03:55):
Hehehe! I love this, because it won’t at all feel like Starbucks in your house, but it can at least look like Starbucks.

Dan Gingiss (04:01):
Exactly. So the email said, “no matter where you are, you can feel like you’re at your favorite Starbucks, anytime, With a new collection of virtual backgrounds for your next video meeting.” Now, the collection features these beautiful views from Starbucks stores around the world, giving the person the sense that they’re sitting right there and obviously giving the viewers, you know, on the other side of the call, the sense that the person is sitting right there. I mean, one of my favorites was a store in Japan that has a ceiling design that is made from more than 2000 wooden sticks. And these sticks are just coming down almost like daggers out of the ceiling. It’s really interesting looking. There’s one that’s an outside view that is gorgeous in the, in Seattle, which as we know is Starbucks’ hometown. There are even video backgrounds of Starbucks’ cold brew and nitro beverages that are actually moving in the cup.

Joey Coleman (04:56):
I don’t even like coffee and I want a “nitro” just because of the name. It’s so exciting. You know what I love about this idea, Dan is so many people have settled into this idea of working from home and using Zoom or some other video conferencing service every day. And they want to show a little more personalization by customizing a virtual background, or they want to hide the fact that they haven’t folded the laundry by customizing a virtual background, or they make it want to make it seem like they’re in a nicer place than they actually live by customizing the virtual background. The moral of the story is, the folks at Starbucks saw this as an opportunity to participate in a different, yet familiar way in their customers’ lives. They’re able to create these free downloadable backgrounds that create some connection to the customer because it kind of feels like a Starbucks, but it’s not like this overly branded, “You are sponsored by Starbucks now!”

Dan Gingiss (05:50):
Yeah, I totally agree. I think as a marketer, this campaign is brilliant in its simplicity. I mean, it perfectly fits the Starbucks brand and it’s fun without being intrusive or salesy, as you say, and it taps into people’s emotions. I mean, that people are feeling right now. We all want to return back to normal. We want to be sitting at the Starbucks again, even if we don’t like coffee. And it also, wasn’t likely very costly because after all Starbucks already owned these images, right? So this was not a particularly expensive campaign as far as I can tell. So what can your company do to connect with customers during this unique time? We actually have three ideas. Joey, you want to start us off?

Joey Coleman (06:38):
Sure Dan! I think the first thing is to find something that resonates with your customers at an emotional level. I mean, let’s be honest, it’s never been easier to show empathy to customers because we know exactly what they’re going through. We’re all going through the same thing here, and yet it’s surprising how few brands are putting empathy first. How few brands are acknowledging that their customers, like them, are stuck at home. They’re missing their family and friends. They’re fearful of contracting COVID-19 or infecting others. We should all be able to relate to that. And so I think being able to harness into some type of an emotional connection with your customers is a great place to startE

Dan Gingiss (07:24):
Secondly, make sure that the concept connects back to your brand. Now last season in episode 94, when we had a COVID-19 episode, we talked about Charles Schwab sending a unique email about resources to help customers through a volatile stock market when everyone else was sending those same enhanced cleaning procedures emails. Now, if we had Schwab offering virtual backgrounds of its bank branches…

Joey Coleman (07:50):
Hahaha!

Dan Gingiss (07:50):
Or for that matter, Starbucks offering stock market advice, it probably wouldn’t work!

Joey Coleman (07:55):
Stay in your lane people! Stay in your lane!

Dan Gingiss (07:57):
So companies need to find something that is quintessentially their brand. And as we know with Starbucks, their brand is all about that third place, right? Home, work, Starbucks. And bringing that third place into the home when we can’t get out to it, is quintessentially the Starbucks brand.

Joey Coleman (08:15):
Absolutely. Dan and you know, the other thing about it is so many people have a strong, visceral, emotional connection to sitting in Starbucks. Doing their email. Writing their next business plan. You know, writing their novel. Dreaming up what they’re going to do next. Just surfing the web! So “pretending” you are in Starbucks by having that virtual Zoom background is not a big leap. I mean, to your point about Schwab, if it was pretending that you were sitting in a bank branch, I don’t know about you, and this is nothing against Schwab, but I don’t have these fond multitude of memories from throughout my life of sitting in a bank. I have plenty of memories of sitting in coffee shops. And so I think that brings us to our third point, which is: have fun with this. You know, everybody is feeling unbelievable levels of stress. Unbelievable levels of uncertainty. There is a huge opportunity, I would posit, for every brand on the planet to have some fun. Everyone’s looking for a little release from the stress of the last few months. Everyone’s looking for a little bit of a pressure valve turn for the stress of what we anticipate the next few months are going to be. I mean, we need something to shake things up. And now is a great opportunity to get some of your most creative and funny and interesting employees together and brainstorm ideas for capturing your customer’s hearts and in the process, maybe a little bit of their wallet.

[SEGMENT INTRO – REDESIGNING THE EXPERIENCE]

Joey Coleman (09:48):
With a pandemic sweeping the globe and shifting the way organizations interact with their customers, many of the old ways of operating just don’t work anymore. As we all navigate a COVID-19 world, it’s time to Redesign the Experience.

[REDESIGNING THE EXPERIENCE] Classroom Creativity Allows for Student Certainty

Joey Coleman (10:07):
In the last segment, we talked about the redesigned and redefined experience of work in the COVID-19 era, but there’s another aspect of life that is being impacted in families around the world right now, and in the USA in particular.

Dan Gingiss (10:22):
I’m guessing there’s a chance you’re talking about the school experience?

Joey Coleman (10:26):
Exactly Dan. I don’t know about you, and I know your kids are a little bit older, but I feel like this conversation has been the ongoing conversation with every other set of parents or parent out there that I know. And as all parents try to navigate the shifting sands of in-person, socially distance school, or remote, virtual school, or some “pod hybrid combination” of in-person and remote.. let’s just be honest. It’s a world with many, many options, most of which, and with all due respect to the teachers and the administrators who are trying to make this work, most of which feel pretty messy and not that ideal for the teachers or the parents, let alone the students.

Dan Gingiss (11:12):
Yeah, I mean, it’s interesting because, first of all, even different schools in neighboring suburbs are making different decisions, which I think is the first thing that’s very curious. The other thing though, is that depending on your student and how they learn and their personality, one or the other may be better for them. I mean, I’ll give you an example: mMy daughter who’s 12 is pretty much an introvert and she loves staying at home and she thinks she learns more staying at home, and so the virtual thing doesn’t bother her as much. My son, who’s an extrovert, he’s 14, it kills him to be at home all the time. He wants to be out at school. So that’s kind of adding to the whole complexion of the debate around this.

Joey Coleman (11:58):
Oh 100%! And then add on top of that, so we look at the personalities, but let’s just also look at the ages. You know, your kids are older than my kids. I have a seven year old and a four year old. And as I look at my kids scenarios, you know, to ask either of my boys to socially distance at school – that will maybe last for six and a half minutes before they will be all over the other kids. And it’s not because they’re bad kids it’s because, oh, did I mention they are seven and four? Like you can’t ask a four year old to play with other four year olds and not touch them, not be close to them, not share with them. I saw a meme online today that showed a picture of, you know, a mom greeting, a little kid getting off the school bus and the kid has a mask on and the line the mom is saying is, “Oh, Billy, that’s not the mask you went to school with today?” And the kid is saying, “I know! Timmy’s mask was cooler so he traded with Johnny and Johnny traded with me and I’m like, oh my God. it’s like it’s so true! Like it was, it was put out there hopefully is a pressure release for people to not, you know, be anxious about these fears that their kid’s going to go to school. But I saw it and I was like, no, the reason it’s funny, like most jokes is because there’s an element of truth to it. And let’s be clear friends, Dan and I don’t have a horse in this race. Okay. The arguments for, and against, in-person schooling or remote schooling during a pandemic could take up every episode for the rest of this season and probably the next 10 seasons of Experience This for that matter. Okay. But because we’re a show all about experience, we wanted to share a story out of Florida that we came across that seemed very much in alignment with the Experience This philosophy of finding creative ways to create remarkable experiences. So as we redesign every type of experience we have, we wanted to highlight the work of two teachers who have created a very interesting experience in their classroom.

Dan Gingiss (13:52):
Two first grade teachers in Deland, Florida transformed their students’ desks into little Jeeps in an effort to make social distancing, less scary for their students, Patricia Dovi and Kim Martin teach at Saint Barnabas Episcopal school. They spent a week redesigning the desks, which feature tires, headlights and license plates made from construction paper. Three-sided plastic dividers that serve as windshields and side windows while also serving the practical purpose of being sneeze guards. The desks, which are spaced far apart are the only place where students are permitted to remove their face mask.

Joey Coleman (14:30):
Now, what’s so fascinating about this story is that the teachers have created a space, a space that makes students feel safe while also following the recommended health and safety guidelines. As ms. Martin explains quote, our school gave us plexiglass tri-folds, which we felt would overwhelm our little ones. So we took the design and them into little Jeeps. We add a little meet the teacher session, and we gave them keys to their car and told them that just like a motor vehicle, you have to stay in your car at all times and wear a mask. When you get out in case you come across hazardous conditions. So we’re playing on this vehicle concept to turn social distancing fun and more kid friendly.

Dan Gingiss (15:15):
As it turns out ms Dovi and ms. Martin were inspired by a kindergarten teacher in Texas who posted a photo on Instagram showing her classroom desks transformed into Jeeps as the head of the school. Paul Garcia noted. I was truly pleased to hear when the idea to decorate the first graders desks as Jeeps was presented to me, this is one example of many examples in which this team of teachers and all of our team search and find ways to make our students learning environment fun and engaging, especially during this difficult time.

Joey Coleman (15:45):
You know, Dan, I have been, as I mentioned earlier, in so many conversations with parents who are wondering, is it okay to send my kids back to school? And if I do, what are they going to, what’s their experience going to be like? And if I don’t, what is the experience going to be like? And I have to tell you as the parent of a second grader, the idea of walking into school and getting keys to the Jeep, I know is something that my son would love. In fact, both of my sons would love it. You know, a preschooler and a second grader. I just love the creativity behind this. And the way that form is meeting function, right? The design of the Jeep is not only making the kids feel comfortable and you know, it’s aesthetically pleasing and it’s creative and it’s engaging, but it’s serving this very important purpose of helping the kids not to infect each other.

Dan Gingiss (16:38):
Yeah. And you know, the part of the story that I’m kind of surprised hasn’t come up yet is why isn’t Jeep sponsoring this/!

Joey Coleman (16:48):
Great question! Hopefully someone from Jeep is listening. This is a great opportunity Jeep to make little kits and send them to all the schools, building brand awareness or, or, or all of your Jeep owners and say, Hey, here are the things we do or sponsor an individual classroom. You know, individual dealers could do stuff. I mean, the possibilities are limitless.

Dan Gingiss (17:09):
And as we said in the last segment, having a little fun is what everybody needs right now. And certainly first graders are great at having fun. And, and, you know, we learn a lot and in marketing about watching kindergartners and first graders and how they play and how they do things because it’s so creative. And there’s something that happens when we grow up where we sort of lose that creativity a little bit. And I love that, you know, and God blessed teachers because they are, you know, among the most important people in the world and drastically undervalued and undercompensated. But I love that these two women who are with first graders all day are thinking as creatively as these little kids are and really turning what could be a scary, intimidating situation into something that’s super fun.

Joey Coleman (18:00):
Dan, I totally agree with you. You know, and what I think is fascinating about this time period, we’re in, as, as you said at the outset here, the impact of COVID-19 on so many people personally, professionally, in terms of their health, in terms of their mental and emotional state, in terms of their finances, in terms of their career prospects, in terms of loss of life has been earth shattering, it’s been absolutely devastating. And yet there is some hope. There is a glimmer that we can look to and say, but this is different. This is exciting. Here’s somebody that’s, you know, taking the lemons and turning them into lemonade. You know, I was having a conversation with a buddy of mine who’s an entrepreneur by the name of Steve Weaver, and he commented that if we were to go back a hundred years in time and grab someone and through a time machine, bring them into the present, everything they interacted with would seem radically different to them. Except education. Education is the one area of our lives where the way we did this a hundred years ago is the same way we do it today: A teacher standing in the front of a classroom with a bunch of students sitting in desks, feet on the floor, facing forward, you know, hands on their desk, not fidgeting, not moving, supposed to just write their lessons, hand in their homework. We’re grading it by hand, et cetera, et cetera. That is the way most schools operate today. And while a visitor from a hundred years ago would be like, wait, what a telephone? Oh my gosh, TV cars. What are you talking about? They would see all these things and be in shock. If you wanted to comfort them, you take them to the classroom. So one of the silver linings here I think is that the world of education has been forced because of COVID-19 to step into the modern era in an entirely new way. And I know that’s uncomfortable for the teachers. It’s potentially uncomfortable for some of the students and the parents, but I think it’s long overdue.

Dan Gingiss (20:03):
Well, and why are we sitting here talking about classrooms on a business show? The answer is because what Joey just said about education being forced into change is what most of us are feeling in our businesses today. No matter what industry we’re in it, name an industry. And it’s been forced into change in the last few months. And I think what’s great about this story is that it is taking this forced change. And it’s saying, all right, we got this right. We’re going to roll with this. And we’re going to do something different and better. And like many things that I think are going to come out of this pandemic. I bet maybe they’ll get rid of the plexiglass a windows, but I’ll bet those Jeep stay because the kids love it. And because it’s fun. And the whole idea of handing them the keys to their education every year is brilliant. And so I think the lesson is that we can all be more creative. We can all have more fun and we can lean into the change that the pandemic has required of us rather than resent it or be fearful of it or worse push up against it.

Joey Coleman (21:13):
Ooo Dan, I love that phrase. You must have been a marketer handing them the keys to their education. I love it. I love it. Like kids are excited to go to school. Why not make everyone excited to go to school? I mean, as a parent walking into that classroom, I would be excited friends. We are only limited in this crazy pandemic time, by our own creativity, there are opportunities to enhance the experience. It’s just how willing are you to try something new, to innovate, to shift it up, to change it around. I’d like to conclude this segment with some words from Ms. Martin, one of the first grade teachers who brought Jeep desk into the classroom, “[a]ll of us have some sort of anxiety about going back to school. It’s going to look a hundred percent different than it’s looked in my 20 years of teaching. But our goal is making our kids happy. The playfulness will help them cope.” If only we could all focus a little bit more on the playfulness we could use to help all of us.

Dan Gingiss (22:27):
I think it’s time to tell them.

Joey Coleman (22:28):
Really. Are you sure?

Dan Gingiss (22:30):
Yeah. I think it’s time.

Joey Coleman (22:33):
Okay. You know, I’m going to trust your gut on this one day in and let’s do it. You know, we’ve teased about this a little bit in the previous episodes. And I think it’s time to make the official announcement.

Dan Gingiss (22:44):
Thanks to the support and encouragement from our good friends at Avtex.

Joey Coleman (22:51):
Who as our loyal listeners know are our partners in creating the Experience This Show for the third consecutive year!

Dan Gingiss (22:58):
We have a new show coming your way, and it’s called Experience Points.

Joey Coleman (23:05):
Experience Points is a new game show all about customer and employee experience. We want to share the best strategies and tactics for creating remarkable experiences while featuring some truly fun and exciting contestants. When you tune into experience points, which will be available in video form and as an audio podcast, you’ll get to see our quote unquote, celebrity contestants, answer questions about customer and employee experience and share their thoughts on how to make your interactions remarkable. Now, in the show, we play a series of three games and each time a contestant answers a question correctly, they win points. These points then turn into dollars for the charity of the contestants choosing thanks to a generous donation from our friends at Aztecs who transform customer experience through CX design and orchestration.

Speaker 2 (24:00):
Now, Joey and I have started recording some of these episodes and we can tell you without a doubt, this show is going to be so much fun. It’s a hoot friends. It’s going to be awesome. We’ve got great contestants lined up, including the godfather of customer service, Shep Hyken innovation,

Speaker 3 (24:18):
An expert and trend spotter, Rohit

Speaker 2 (24:22):
GABA, New York times bestseller and keynote speaker Che bear,

Speaker 3 (24:27):
Executive coaching and attention strategist, Neen, James,

Speaker 2 (24:32):
Small business coach and speaker preneur Marquesas way,

Speaker 3 (24:36):
The incredibly energetic and wildly entertaining owner of the Savannah bananas, baseball team, Jesse,

Speaker 2 (24:44):
And many, many more

Speaker 3 (24:47):
The show is coming in a few weeks. So keep your eyes open on social media and your ears on this podcast for the official kickoff announcement. And if you’re so inclined, we’d love to have you check out

Speaker 2 (24:59):
Experience points

Speaker 3 (25:03):
With a pandemic, sweeping the globe and shifting the way organizations interact with their customers. Many of the old ways of operating just don’t work anymore. As we all navigate a COVID-19 world, it’s time to redesign the experience.

Speaker 2 (25:22):
Hey Joey, remember those Capri sun juice pouches from when you were a kid?

Speaker 3 (25:27):
I don’t know if the phrase when you were a kid necessarily applies. Cause I was thinking that I was probably drinking some Capri sun juice pouches, well into high school. So yeah, I know what you’re talking about. I think the jingle, I seem to remember it was kind of like a Capri sun and then there would be this radio announcer voice saying like now available in the hologram packaging, you know, and that kind of thing. So yeah, they were tasty little, uh, I remember him, it’s like a summer drink, you know, poke the pouch with the straw. I have a nice little energy drink and get back to your plan.

Speaker 2 (25:58):
Exactly. Well, the marketer in me had to share this story because I think Capri sun is doing something absolutely brilliant in response to the COVID-19 pandemic and the new school experiences that we talked about in the last segment. So I happened upon a full page ad in the Chicago Tribune. Ooh, that’s a big deal full page ad. It is. And it showed a picture of a new pouch, which you’ll you’ll find out about in a moment. And, and I’m going to read the words, it’s a couple of paragraphs, but it kind of imagined this ad in, in sort of a fun type face. So it’s not like a tight thing or it’s like, and something fun. Yes, exactly. So the title of it says, we’re sorry. And here’s what it reads. We’re sorry that recess is on recess. We’re sorry that masks aren’t just for Halloween.

Speaker 2 (26:52):
And most importantly, we’re sorry that the Capri sun pouches you’ll be receiving at school are filled with filtered water. We know that when you reach for our pouch, you expect your favorite juice drink, but sometimes things don’t go as planned, especially in times as weird as these, some of us wanted to be astronauts didn’t happen. We’re in the juice game and proud of it. And now apparently in the water game too, you may be asking where’s the juice well with water fountains at many of your schools off limits, we want to help make sure you get the filtered water. You need to help you stay hydrated so you can grow and thrive. That’s why we’re giving students across Chicago land Capri sun. We’re sorry. It’s not juice. When they come back to class, is it kid’s number one? Favorite juice drink? Not even close, but although it may not be the pouch you want right now, it’s the pouch. You need your friends at CAPRISA. And then at the bottom of the ad, maybe my favorite part, it says, we’re sorry, kids. You’re welcome parents.

Speaker 3 (27:58):
I love it. I love it. Oh, there’s so many things about this or that are brilliant. Dan, first of all, talk about creative copy, right? It just speaks the truth. You know, we’ve talked about the last two segments, this idea of leading with empathy and acknowledging the elephant in the room. And this ad clearly does that, but it’s also a little bit irreverent and it’s fun. And it’s on brand for Capri sun. I mean, if you think back to their commercials from when you were a kid or even just the memories, you might have a drinking, a Capri sun, it was not, this stayed kind of, Hey, this is a buttoned up drink. No, it was meant to be fun. It was meant to be playful. It was meant to be entertaining and engaging. And I feel like the ad is doing that, especially since they’re almost like, it almost seems like they’re slightly apologetic for the fact that it’s just water, not juice, but they hit with a really important reason as to why they’re doing

Speaker 2 (28:52):
Well. Yeah. And so the picture that I mentioned before is of a fairly plain looking Caprice on pouch. And it says, Capri sun, we’re sorry, it’s not juice. Like, that’s the name of the product? And the other thing I thought was fascinating because I mean, this is a newspaper ad that is written to kids now. Clearly kids are not reading newspapers, right? So clearly this is really aimed at the parents. But the other thing that accompanied this ad that I thought was downright hilarious is they created a video that was essentially pretending that they were doing focus groups with kids about this new tranq, except they weren’t actually telling them what was in it. And so they go to these kids and they’re like, Hey, we’re here from CAPRISA. We like your kids. Yeah. Would I get to try a new flavor? They taste it. And the expression out of their faces is just awesome. And they’re like kind of tastes plain. I think this one is, I think it’s just, what are the whole thing is absolutely hilarious. So we actually have some audio from this commercial and we’d love to play it. You definitely have to see it to see the kids’ faces, but you’ll get a great idea of what it’s about just by listening. Here we go.

Speaker 4 (30:14):
And this is a joke. It doesn’t have any free from flying. It’s it’s just, what does it taste like? My mouth tastes like water it’s wire, having a water break, a preset hit or miss mess. Is there anything you wish Capri sun did differently? Probably not make it water. That’s a great note.

Speaker 2 (30:38):
I love when companies are willing to either poke a little fun at themselves or be self-deprecating or just add some wittiness or humor to a situation that kinda warranted. I mean, you know, they don’t want to be making water pouches, but they are. They’ve been, we talked in a previous segment about having to pivot and having to adapt and doing so creatively. And so they’re doing a great thing by putting those water in school and then they’re making it fun. And I think that’s, again, the marketer in me is what loved this. Well, and I, I love the playfulness and I know you are a longtime fan of the witty, Dan, there’s also a throwback to the nostalgia piece of this, right? Like, as you said, the ad is written to kids, but let’s be candid. It’s written to the kid who now has kids, right.

Speaker 2 (31:27):
It’s written to the parent who grew up on CAPRISA and who’s now reading this going, Oh, it’s not your dad’s Capri sun or your mom’s Capri sun. It’s the new Capri sun. That is the COVID-19 Capri sun, which means it’s not juice, it’s water, which is just it’s playful. It’s engaging. And from like a brand strategy point of view, it really allows them, I think, to kind of cleave off this experience when we get on the other side of COVID-19, right? So whether they continue to make water pouches or not, it’s like they created this little moment in time, not only with the product, but with the messaging that ideally, you know, their audience feeling good about Capri sun, whether they’re buying the water pouch or they’re buying the juice. Exactly. And you know, to be clear, they’re not the only company that has adapted their product because of COVID-19.

Speaker 2 (32:19):
We’ve read about a lot of alcohol companies, for example, making hand sanitizer and literally shutting down their facilities in order to pump out more hand sanitizer, we’ve heard about automobile companies making, you know, medical equipment. And so there’s a lot of companies that have done things like this. What I thought was different about this was the fact that they were able to turn it into really fun marketing and to just get people, to relax and laugh a little bit, which frankly we all need. Because as we’ve mentioned now, a couple of times on this episode, everybody’s stressed out. Everybody just wants to kind of exhale. And if you read something funny or you watch this video on YouTube, which is, you know, really will make you laugh. Even if you’re not a parent it’s these kids are, are awesome. I just think that’s what the, what we all need right now, which is why I loved it.

Speaker 3 (33:13):
Yeah. And it’s, it’s almost like it’s a little bit of a throwback to a simpler time, right? I don’t know about you, Dan, but when I think back to being a kid, not only was I not worried about a pandemic, but I wasn’t worried about much of anything. You know what I mean? You’re just being a kid. And I think one of the pieces of this puzzle that so many parents are struggling with is looking at kids today and thinking, what are the longterm implications of the stress that they’re under? And these shifts in these changes. Now, the good thing is kids are resilient. And as a general rule, kids don’t know any different. I mean, we were talking about our boys and it’s like, for all, my son knows that age seven, you have a pandemic every seven years, right? Like his frame of reference is pretty small compared to his father’s who it’s like, Oh my gosh, I haven’t had a pandemic in my life and I’m fast approaching half a century old. So it’s one of those things where I love the nostalgia play here, combined with the playfulness combined with the innovation of let’s take our product in a new direction, in response to what’s going on in the world.

Speaker 2 (34:22):
Yeah. And I do want to clarify for our audience, Joey is the older one. So true. So I don’t know anything about a half year.

Speaker 3 (34:30):
You couldn’t tell by the, uh, the hair hairlines, but I am indeed the older of the two.

Speaker 2 (34:36):
Exactly, exactly. So I think to, to kind of conclude on this one, if you are in really any business, you have pivoted and you had to do something different for your customers. And as we said, at the outset of this episode, a lot of the things that we’re doing right now are probably going to outlast the pandemic. And even if they don’t literally, like, let’s say, Capri sun does not continue to make water pouches, what will outlast the pandemic is how people feel about the brand because of how the brand treated them at this moment in time. And I think I give kudos to the company for being brave and for being creative and for putting something out in the marketplace that not only is obviously helpful and useful and healthy to the students, I should say, by the way, they were giving away these pouches, they’re not selling them. So they, they gave them away to a whole bunch of schools in the Chicago land area. So they’re only doing a good thing, but they’re also brand building and they’re doing it in a way that doesn’t say, go out and buy CAPRISA. It says, we’re a great company. We’re here to help we’re here when you need us. And that’s what people are looking for right now. So I say, kudos, great job.

Speaker 1 (35:59):
Wow. Thanks for joining us. For another episode of experience this we know there are tons of podcasts to listen, to magazines and books, to read reality TV, to watch. We don’t take for granted that you’ve decided to spend some quality time listening to the two of us. We hope you enjoyed our discussions. And if you do, we’d love to hear about it. Come on over to experience this show.com and let us know what segments you enjoyed, what new segments you’d like to hear. This show is all about experience and we want you to be part of the experience.

Speaker 2 (36:30):
Yes, Joe, thanks again for your time. And we’ll see you next week for more experience.