Episode 122 – Crystal Clean Experiences with Innovative Videos

Join us as we discuss using video to help explain things to your customers, avoiding irrelevance through digital innovation, and a maid service that is doing far more than just sweeping and dusting.

Fixing, Digitizing, and Cleaning– Oh My!

Referenced in the Show

Check out the video Dan received from his auto technician:

Host Contact Information

Email Dan: Dan@dangingiss.com

Tweet Dan Gingiss: @DGingiss

Email Joey: JoeyC@JoeyColeman.com

DanGingiss.com

JoeyColeman.com

Subscribe to Experience This on Apple Podcasts

Learn more about our Season 7 Partner – Solvvy – The NextGen Chatbot

Episode Transcript

Download an unedited transcript of Episode 122 here or read it below:

Joey Coleman (00:05):
Welcome to Experience This!

Dan Gingiss (00:07):
The podcast that celebrates remarkable customer experiences and inspires you to stand out from the competition by wowing your customers.

Joey Coleman (00:17):
Each episode, we bring you a healthy dose of inspiring stories, funny interactions, and practical takeaways. Marketing and customer experience thought leader, Dan Gingiss…

Dan Gingiss (00:30):
shares the mic with customer retention and employee experience expert, Joey Coleman, helping you to get people talking about your business.

Joey Coleman (00:40):
So get ready because it’s time to Experience This!

Dan Gingiss (00:49):
Get ready for another episode of the Experience This Show!

Joey Coleman (00:56):
Join us as we discuss: using video to help explain things to your customers, avoiding irrelevance through digital innovation, and a maid service that is doing far more than just sweeping and dusting.

Dan Gingiss (01:11):
Fixing, Digitizing, and Cleaning – Oh my!

Joey Coleman (01:17):
We love telling stories and sharing key insights you can implement, or avoid, based on our experiences. Can you believe that This Just Happened!?!

Dan Gingiss (01:31):
So Joey – you may remember from way back in Season 1, Episode 10, that I’m a big fan of BMW. And I believe that the ultimate driving experience not only describes what it’s like to be in the car, but it actually describes what it’s like to have the car serviced after you purchased the car.

Joey Coleman (01:53):
Yes, I do recall. What’s interesting Dan is I’m remembering that you really loved the place where you took your car to be serviced. And we’ve talked about that before, and we’ve talked in past episodes about how much I love the place where I took my car to be serviced. I think we are probably the should buy a lottery ticket because it is rare that two people would find such love for their auto mechanic.

Dan Gingiss (02:16):
For sure. For sure. Now I wanted to come back to this same dealership, which is Field’s BMW in Northfield, Illinois and talk about something that I like to call blind transactions.

Joey Coleman (02:29):
Ooo blind transactions – do tell us more!

Dan Gingiss (02:32):
Well, this is where a customer doesn’t really know what’s going on and just has to trust the provider. So think about going to the dentist. And the dentist says, Oh, this tooth needs a crown. And you’re like, okay, I guess I got a crown?

Joey Coleman (02:50):
Sure it does!

Dan Gingiss (02:51):
I mean, I don’t know any different. I got to trust the dentist, right. Or I had a refrigerator guy out one day and my refrigerator wasn’t cooling. He said, well, you need more Freon.

Joey Coleman (03:01):
Was it Freon? It’s like, literally the only thing I know about refrigeration is that Freon is somehow involved. How much, how you know if you need more, I have no idea?!

Dan Gingiss (03:11):
Well, and they’re also phasing it out because it’s environmentally disastrous. And so it’s like 400 dollars.

Joey Coleman (03:16):
Freon is not free kids!

Dan Gingiss (03:19):
Anyway. So going to the auto mechanic is kind of like that for me, I’m not much of a car guy. And so when they say, Hey, you need new brake pads. I’m like, Oh, okay. Brake pads sound important. We better get those. Right. I mean, so it’s a blind transaction for me.

Joey Coleman (03:32):
I had a teacher in high school that always used to joke about with kids to prove this point. He would say something like, well, if I told you you needed a new muffler belt, what would you say? And what you’re supposed to say is you’re crazy because a muffler doesn’t have a belt, but the majority of young 16, 17 year olds didn’t know that answer. Right. They had no clue. So yeah, this, this shows up in a lot of industries now that you bring it up.

Dan Gingiss (03:57):
Yeah, definitely does. So anyway, I went in for just an oil change, real, pretty easy. And as part of the oil change, they do a whole once over of the car and house, as I was checking out the associate that was helping me said here, I want to show you this video. And he brings up on his screen and they also emailed this to me about a two minute video of the auto mechanic underneath my car and showing me all of the parts underneath my car and how he was inspecting them. And what was so cool was like when he went to check the width of the tires, right. To make sure that, uh, that there wasn’t too much wear…

Joey Coleman (04:40):
The car is on tires! Ladies and gentlemen, we’re seeing just how much of a blind transaction this actually is for Dan!

Dan Gingiss (04:47):
Oh, geez. I mean, but anyway, he was looking at, uh, you know, to, to look at the treads, right. He’s looking at the width, but what’s cool is in the video, you actually see the measurement tool that he’s using and you can see the measurement. So it’s not like he’s, you know, you don’t have to worry about him, lying to you and saying, Oh yeah, it looks just fine. Or, Oh, you need new tires. He’s actually showing you measuring, showing himself, measuring it and giving you the results. So let’s cut to the audio. I understand folks that the audio is going to be a little bit different on a podcast, but Hey, it’s a podcast. So we’re going to listen in and just imagine Jerry, the mechanic is literally underneath my car with his phone, taking this video.

Jerry the Technician (05:30):
Hello. My name is Jerry. I’m the technician forming services on your vehicle today. Uh, just a quick look at your undercarriage, starting with the rear tires. I’m going to clear out of the way. Uh, if you see the measurement sets seven millimeters and the CADing it’s in like-new condition, uh, same thing goes for your brakes. Uh, pads are measured at 10 millimeters rotor faces are in good condition. There’s no corrosion or pitting. So those are looking good. Uh, following the suspension over here, there’s nothing bent or out of place. Everything looks like as it’s supposed to. I was rear differential, no leaks left rear tire also measured at seven millimeters in the green. Continue on air exhaust is free of damage, positioned correctly, free of leaks transfer case transmission pan will pan are all clean and free of leaks. I’m trying to get a good view up here and it kind of crowded your valve cover everything up there at the top of the engine is clean and free of leaks. Uh, your front tire is also measured seven millimeters. So they’re also in good condition. Your suspension everything’s tight as it should be. Nothing loose, nothing damaged a tire person for adjusted. We’re going to continue the inspection at the top of the vehicle. All right, here, we have a shot at your engine bay. We’re about to pull the engine oil and complete your service washer solve. It was full or filled. I’m sorry. Cool levels. Check the field. It prompts me to service a top of the engine. Does that reveal analytics doesn’t look like there’s anything or worry about. Um, so your inspections good. Uh, nothing further to report. If you have any questions regarding this video, please contact for service advisor. Otherwise thank you for trusting Field BMW.

Dan Gingiss (07:34):
So Joey, when I saw this video, I’m not saying that I felt like a car guy, but I certainly felt a whole lot more educated and informed. And I felt like I had the peace of mind that they checked everything over and I could get in my car and drive on the snowy icy roads home, and that I was going to be safe. And I thought that was fantastic.

Joey Coleman (07:55):
Well, I also thought my goodness, I’ve learned a thing or two about the underside of Dan’s car and Dan takes really good care of his vehicle. Yeah. I loved this for so many ways. And I actually like, and we’ll we’ll post the video on the show notes page at ExperienceThisShow.com, but I actually liked listening to just the audio because with the narration alone, you get an education, you get some insight as to what’s going on and what came up for me to be completely candid. When, when you shared this video, Dan, is that why doesn’t every mechanic do this? I’ve actually spoken to an association of auto mechanic repair shop owners, which yes, it exists. And what was fascinating is we were talking about using video and no one was using video in any capacity. And here’s your mechanic. Who’s not only using video to create connection, which we’ve talked about many times. This is such a great thing, but it’s using video to do education. It’s highly personalized and customized. And I don’t know if I was anywhere in the Chicago land region and I had a BMW. I would want to go to this place if nothing else, because they’re creating remarkable experiences and proving their work, showing, you know, bringing sight to the blind transaction as one might say,

Dan Gingiss (09:21):
Well, exactly. And that’s, I think the importance and what we are, we all need to think about in terms of using video in customer experiences. Because as you said, there’s blind transactions all over the place. There’s scary for the consumer. Nobody wants to be taken advantage of or to lose money. And so, but we often just don’t know. And yeah, I think this should be true of pretty much every industry in which you have to trust. Right? And, uh, and we’re seeing stuff in the dental industry too, with this 3d imaging where dentists can now show you a 3d image of your tooth and, and at least better than kind of the old x-ray where they’re like, you know, “You see there, you’ve got all of this kind of like…

Joey Coleman (10:02):
Where’s the funny bone? Can you read that one?

Dan Gingiss (10:08):
Um, but you know, this actually got me thinking Joey, about our very first ever book report on Experience This, it was Episode 4, Season 1. Do you remember who that was?

Joey Coleman (10:20):
Oh, geez. You’re going to call me out here?

Dan Gingiss (10:22):
Videos the hint – video.

Joey Coleman (10:25):
Video killed the radio star. Uh, I do I’m…

Dan Gingiss (10:29):
If you said Marcus Sheridan’s book, “They Ask, You Answer”

Joey Coleman (10:40):
His new book is The Video Sale. Yes. The Visual Sale. Yes.

Dan Gingiss (10:45):
Actually we’ve done both of his books. That’s right. We started with, They Ask, You Answer and his new book is The Visual Sale. But point is Marcus talks about using video in sales and marketing, and he’s an inbound marketing expert, but there’s no reason why we can’t use video. Once people become customers. And you know, it helps people through these blind transactions and allows them to feel confident in where they’re going. And like you said, I am always going to bring my car back to this dealership. I know, I know there’s probably a mechanic down the street. That’s a little bit less expensive, but I like how I’m treated there. I like the omelets. I like the waiting room. And I like being able to see underneath my car and understand something about it.

Joey Coleman (11:30):
I love that some people might want it might think, geez Joey is so bougie with his bull kelp salt. But you, with your omelets, while you get an oil change, you are definitely the more high maintenance of the two [inaudible]. I’m just jealous. I wish omelets were on the menu when I was getting an oil change. You know, I will say the only gentle suggestion I would give for this video, I wish it would have started with the camera, which I presume that person is filming, with their cell phone, I mean, the way the video looks, I would have loved it. If the camera would have started with a selfie shot of the technician, “Hey, I’m Jerry. And today I have the pleasure of working on your car. Mr. Gingiss let me show you a few things…” And then turn the camera around. It adds an extra layer of humanization. And when we think about this blend between remarkable customer experience and remarkable employee experience at the end of the day, what I think we’re striving for is remarkable human experiences. The experiences that allow us to connect personally, that allow our humanity to be part of the conversation. And one of the great ways to do that is to let your customers see your employees and let your employees be seen. Now, some employees may not be super excited about that in the beginning, but I promise that as you do it more and more, they will feel more connected and engaged with the customers as well.

Dan Gingiss (13:00):
Oh, absolutely. I could see people coming into this place and requesting Jerry is their mechanic. Now they know him. So love it. And Hey, if you have any questions regarding the video, please contact your service advisor and not Dan because he doesn’t understand all of it, but he sure felt better about getting this car fixed at Fields BMD.

Joey Coleman (13:23):
We’re excited to give you an overview of an important book you should know about as well as share some of our favorite passages as part of our next Book Report.

Dan Gingiss (13:35):
Today’s Book Report is about “Winning Digital Customers: The Antidote to Irrelevance” by Howard Tiersky with a foreword, by the way, by Michelle McKenna, who is interestingly the CIO of the NFL.

Joey Coleman (13:51):
That’s gotta be a cool gig. The CIO of the NFL? I love it. I love it. I’m not a huge NFL fan, but I have to imagine that’s a fascinating, uh, gig.

Dan Gingiss (14:02):
Well, I am a big football fan and I, I definitely think it is. So I got a chance to talk with Howard Tiersky and fascinating guy, uh, with a fascinating background. And I really, really liked this book. And as you know, as well, Joey, when he sent us copies of it, he sent it in a customized box that arrived and like the box had the cover of the book on it in printed.

Joey Coleman (14:30):
I was going to say, I loved this book before I opened the book.

Dan Gingiss (14:35):
Totally.

Joey Coleman (14:35):
Right. Because the packaging and you know, that age old phrase, don’t judge a book by its cover. Other reason why it’s an age old phrase is because people do judge books by their cover all the time. And the idea of the package that he sent the book to us in coming and looking beautiful and having messaging on it and the book cover on it. Oh, I too was intrigued before I even cracked the spine of the book and started reading.

Dan Gingiss (14:58):
And when you did crack the spine of the book, it’s a great book. And I think it’s so important that we’re talking about digital experience, especially now in 2021, when 2020 caused a lot of customers to have to go digital. And maybe even the unwilling ones, everybody went digital because you kind of had to in so many different industries. And so digital was big before it’s now an absolutely required part of the business. So as always, we asked Howard to give us an overview of his book and Here he is:

Howard Tiersky (15:32):
Hi, this is Howard Tiersky author of the wall street journal bestselling book, Winning Digital Customers: The Antidote to Irrelevance. Now who should read this book? Well, I’ll tell you, I wrote this book with the executive at a large enterprise in mind, who’s responsible in some way for driving the digital success of a legacy brand, which is to say someone could be in marketing. Someone in technology, someone in operations could even be a CEO, a CFO, chief marketing officer, somebody who has responsibility for driving digital though. In reality, what I found is I’ve talked to so many people who’ve read the book and been applying. It is that it’s applicable. First of all, to really anybody who has a responsibility associated with driving customer behavior at a company. And second of all, I’ve discovered that small businesses and medium-sized businesses are applying the principles of this book really just as effectively as large enterprises. My experience is mostly working with our enterprises, but what I’ve heard from companies at a variety of sizes is that while my examples in the book are largely focused on large enterprises, frankly, the techniques and practices described in the book are applicable at businesses of any size. So I would encourage anybody who’s interested in the topic of how a company could more effectively serve its customers and especially more effectively adapt today to today’s increasingly digital customers. I would encourage anyone like that to pick up a copy of winning digital customers or read the free chapter, which is available online at: wdc.ht/freechapter.

Joey Coleman (17:06):
Oh, there are a couple of things I love about this, Dan you’re right. Not only is digital more relevant today than ever before, but I love the way Howard kind of calls out this distinction that I think so many readers and people that are working on their businesses think about they’re like, well, but that’s a big business. I run a small business or that’s easy for a small business to do. You don’t understand. We have a large enterprise folks. These are fictions in your mind in the same way that the difference between B2B and B2C a lot of companies make that out as a huge difference. No, it’s, HDH, it’s humans to humans. I think at the end of the day, what I love about this and about Howard’s message is yes, a lot of the case studies in the examples in the book are from larger enterprise companies, but the applicability to anyone who’s interested in the topic of increasing the digital experience for their customers permeates the entire book. So this book is just chock full of fun passages. Let’s let Howard, the wonderful author, go first with his favorite passage:

Howard Tiersky (18:19):
You have a problem. If you are trying to make a legacy brand successful in today’s digital world, you got a problem, but this book is going to tell you exactly what to do about it. My seven-year-old son, Joseph likes to text our family group chat with news stories that he thinks we need to know about such as the recent sightings of giant squids off the coast of Japan. One evening last year, my phone dinged with a group text from Joseph sharing the announcement that very soon every single Toys”R”Us in America would be closing. I was well aware of the problems that the company faced. In fact, Toys”R”Us executives had recently visited our offices to talk about bringing my firm in to help improve their customer experience. But time just ran out. I was disappointed that I wasn’t going to be consulting on a Toys”R”Us turnaround, but little Joe’s text prompted me to imagine how truly devastated I would have been had Toys”R”Us disappeared. When I was his age. I figured I should probably check in. I headed downstairs and approached Joe, who was still at the kitchen computer. I gently asked how he was feeling about the news of the chain’s closure. He thought for a second and then answered with a cheerful shrug. I don’t care seeing my surprise reaction. He gestured back at the screen and reassured me, dad, don’t worry. We can just order whatever we need from Amazon. Some say Toys”R”Us went under because they had too much leverage debt. And it’s true. That was a genuine problem. Others say that downloadable video games reduce the demand for physical toys and they have a bit, but Toys”R”Us died from something more profound, a lack of love. They just no longer mattered as they once did. If seven year old boys don’t care whether your toy store stays or goes, you’re done for. At Joe’s age I did love Toys”R”Us. I also loved my Kodak camera with its flashbulbs speed racer by Timex digital, watch my Atari and I hop a few decades later in life. I loved Borders Bookstores, Melrose Place, and my Blackberry. Today I love my Mac, Google slides, Alexa, and Game of Thrones. And I’m back to loving. iHOP again. How about you? What do you love Disney World? Chipotle, Fortnite, LuluLemon, Snapchat. More importantly, do your customers love your business? This book is a blueprint for earning love from today’s customers who I like to call digital customers. And it’s a treatise on the idea that customer love is the single most important factor in the success of your business.

Dan Gingiss (21:18):
Aww – I love that he talked about Toys”R”Us, cause I use this as an example too. I mean, man, when Toys”R”Us went out of business, it looked exactly like the store from when I was a kid.

Joey Coleman (21:30):
So true! And I was a big fan of Toys”R”Us, like I remember, you know, going to the mall with my parents and begging to be able to go in the Toys”R”Us like begging sure. When you couldn’t just go to Amazon or, or have a digital experience back when we were kids, when the competition for Toys”R”Us was the Sears catalog coming to your house like Toys”R”Us was the real deal. A whole store just filled with toys. Oh my gosh. Yes. It was definitely a sad moment. You know, absolutely. We wax nostalgic for Toys”R”Us, but my favorite passage was about some other brands that I’ve actually got a fair amount of experience with. Here’s the passage from the book:

Joey Coleman (22:16):
Uber eliminates the inconvenience of taking 30 seconds to pay the driver. When you arrive at your destination, Netflix auto starts the next episode of stranger things. So you can binge watch for hours without lifting a finger. Alexa will check your Amazon package delivery status. If you just ask it three words, where’s my stuff. No doubt. They are working on getting that down to one. Digital leaders, obsess over removing every little bit of unnecessary effort that they possibly can.

Dan Gingiss (22:48):
I loved this too. And, and in that same section, he referred to this idea as hyper convenience. And he did credit his friend who was, uh, Avis and Budget Rentacars. But I love the concept of finding a way to reduce the number of steps everywhere you can go. And as we’ve said on this show before, and as I’ve said, many times on stages, this is what I did at Discover Card. When we won the JD Power award for the first time. And we finally took it away from American Express, which of course is an amazing customer experience company. We took a look at our web and mobile digital experiences, and we removed every barrier. We could find hundreds of them, little tiny things that annoyed people, and they complained about it. And we got rid of all of them. And there’s definitely some debate in the CX world about whether you should be getting rid of pain points or creating new experiences. I think you need to do both. And this is a terrific example also of, uh, of how you do that. Now I picked a, a little bit of a longer quote and I want to set this up because I learned something here and was absolutely fascinated. So it turns out that another company that we put in the same category as Toys”R”Us is Blockbuster. R.I.P. Blockbuster spent a lot of time there as a kid. And it turns out that Howard and his consulting team were actually consultants to the leaders of Blockbuster when a little company called Netflix came onto the scene.

Joey Coleman (24:20):
He’s been on the front lines of like a lot of these really pivotal times in big brand life. I mean, he’s the guy, right? He’s been there, done that, got the t-shirt!

Dan Gingiss (24:27):
And he actually said one of his biggest regrets was not successfully convincing Blockbuster management to listen to them because they were providing them with good advice. So let me read:

Dan Gingiss (24:40):
They certainly weren’t clueless. I can tell you that there were many super smart people there. We collaborated with them on a vision that in many ways looks a lot like Netflix today. Streaming services, episodic television with great navigation multi-screen devices. In those days, Netflix was exclusively in the DVD by mail business. Blockbuster was much larger with more money, more customers, more Hollywood relationships, and just about every advantage, but one – they loved, who they already were. As an example of this let’s drill into one of the more profound barriers that kept them from committing to the bold digital vision that they paid us to develop. What was it? Candy. At its peak when blockbuster had 9,000 plus stores, those stores rented a lot of videos, but they also sold a lot of M&Ms, Skittles, and giant Kit-Kats. It was becoming harder to make a significant profit renting DVDs, especially after they stopped charging late fees, because the studios negotiated a fair chunk of the rental price for themselves. But the margin on candy, as well as microwaveable popcorn buckets was huge. Our proposed digital vision faced significant resistance from executives who were perfectly willing to believe that customers would stream video to their homes, but repeatedly pointed out you can’t stream candy. How could the company be successful without candy? It seems to be core to their business model and that mindset made it insurmountable side note. I reviewed Netflix his most recent annual report and still to this date, $0 from the sale of candy. So I guess it was surmountable after all!

Joey Coleman (26:22):
So true. Oh my gosh. Fantastic, fantastic story! You know, there was one, I mean the whole story is beautiful, but there was one sentence that I felt when I was reading it, uh, reached out and grabbed me by the shoulders and shook me.

Dan Gingiss (26:36):
I know which one it is!

Joey Coleman (26:36):
Let’s see, it’s where they say “they loved who they already were.”

Dan Gingiss (26:43):
Yep.

Joey Coleman (26:43):
How many businesses are so caught up in the identity of who they are today, that they are going to be a footnote in history tomorrow? Like I think there is an incredibly valuable exercise for everyone listening, get your team together, get your smartest people in your organization together and sit down and say, if tomorrow we were prohibited from making money, the way we currently do from our number one way that we make money, we weren’t allowed to do it for whatever reason. You know, a law was passed, you know, the supply chain blew up, whatever it is, we have to take that off the table. What do we need to do? I feel like if you’re not regularly and by regularly, I’m thinking at least once a year asking yourself what are the things that we are so entrenched in believing to be true, that you’re not, you know, questioning that and thinking through strategically how you would roll with that. You’re done for, and you know, frankly, the last year has shown a lot of businesses that reality. You know, Dan, you and I both pre COVID a significant part of our life was spent on airplanes. A significant part of our life was spent traveling around. And if we were so in love with who we were in the past, we wouldn’t have been able to be who we are today. So long story short, go check out Winning Digital Customers. It’s a fantastic book. You’re going to want to pick up a copy of this Howard Tiersky, it’s just full of stories and ideas and things that are going to make it so that you can connect more digitally with the customers that you have.

Joey Coleman (28:31):
Almost everyone has interacted with chatbots, but all too often, it’s been a bad experience. In MythBusters – presented by Solvvy – we explore a common myth about CX chatbots and see how the right technology can create a positive experience, every time.

Dan Gingiss (28:57):
Today’s myth about chatbots? All chatbots pretend to be a real person. And usually don’t do that. Great. A job of pretending, for example, you start talking to a support agent named Mary on a website or app. You’re having a great experience close to finding an answer. And then you’re struck with the dreaded, sorry, I don’t understand you. Which is a phrase that no human has ever said in the history of mankind. Did you know that in one study over 50% of individuals said that they were disturbed when they realized they were chatting with a robot and not a real person?

Joey Coleman (29:34):
Understandably so, I mean, the reality is that modern chat bots don’t need to hide behind a persona. While still Being conversational. Leading chatbots today are now able to provide next level customer experiences without having to pretend to be a real person. In fact, most people find these experiences more authentic than getting stuck, chatting with a robot named Mary who doesn’t understand you. Plus it won’t feel awkward in the event that you do start a live chat with an actual real person.

Dan Gingiss (30:06):
Well, I am glad for one that the next generation of chat bots are comfortable in their own skin joint because it’s kind of afraid we were going to have another Lil Miquela situation here.

Joey Coleman (30:20):
Callback! That was nice!

Dan Gingiss (30:21):
But hey, these guys are robots and they’re proud of it.

Joey Coleman (30:25):
That’s another Myth Busted thanks to our friends at Solvvy – the Next Gen Chatbot.

Joey Coleman (30:33):
Sometimes a remarkable experience deserves deeper investigation. We dive into the nitty gritty of customer interactions and dissect how and why they happen. Join us while we’re Dissecting the Experience.

Dan Gingiss (30:51):
Joey and I recently received a terrific voicemail on our website.

Joey Coleman (30:59):
Oh, we so loved this one. It’s so nice. We love hearing from our listeners!

Dan Gingiss (31:02):
We do. And this one in particular was amazing. Her name is Robin Murphy and she’s the owner of Maid Brigade a franchise in that covers a number of counties, Westchester, Fairfield, Rockland, and Putnam counties in New York and Connecticut. Now, before we get to Maid bBrigade, when Robin sent us this voicemail, of course, cause it’s what Joey and I do. We responded to her over email. We started communicating and it turns out she loves the podcast and she left us the voicemail because she was sad that we are on our hiatus Joey and was waiting for us to come back.

Joey Coleman (31:37):
And we were like, Oh my gosh, they are listening. It’s so kind. We love it. Thanks for letting us be on hiatus and letting us know that we were missed while we were on hiatus.

Dan Gingiss (31:47):
Yes – and then Robin was also super kind enough to leave us a positive review on iTunes. And I’m going to read that in a second. But back to Maid Brigade. Maid Brigade is known for its commitment to best practices. And it is the only local company in this area that is green, clean certified. Also Robin and her husband are former franchise of the year winners in the maid brigade franchise system.

Joey Coleman (32:13):
No surprise there once you get to know Robin!

Dan Gingiss (32:15):
Yeah, exactly. They know what they’re doing, but let’s get to this iTunes review. She wrote, “I’ve been listening to the experience this podcast for six months now. And I look forward to when it shows up as a new episode, Tuesday mornings as a small business owner, I understand the value of great clients and my learning from Joey and Dan has been benefiting every aspect of my business, not just a relationship with our clients, but also our employees, and even our vendors, all important to us.

Joey Coleman (32:44):
Woo hoo! Oh, I love it. Thank you Robin. For the review, we love getting reviews on iTunes as it really helps draws new listeners to our show, but you know what? I love even more about the review. Dan. I love that Robin is getting benefit. Not only in terms of her customer experiences, but with her employee experience and her vendor experience. You know, increasingly so many of our conversations are about the human experience. I absolutely love this. So Robin, you let us know that we were, uh, we were providing some value and you provided some lovely value to us. We so appreciate it.

Dan Gingiss (33:17):
Well, as it turns out, Joey, Robin, isn’t just a fan of the show. She is also a big fan of your book. Never lose a customer again.

Joey Coleman (33:27):
Oh, so sweet.

Dan Gingiss (33:28):
Best of all, she has actually implemented some amazing experiences for her customers. See Joey’s book is practical. Guys. You can do it too. Let’s hear Robin. Tell us a little bit about what she’s been doing at may brigade.

Robin Murphy – Maid Brigade (33:45):
Hi Dan and Joey. This is Robin Murphy of Maid Brigade. We are a home cleaning company dedicated to helping people be home. Happy housecleaning is considered a commodity. We get it. It’s easy to find someone who can clean your home for a lot less money than we will, which is why we make sure to give our clients and experience they aren’t going to get from anyone else. Of course, it includes our excellent cleaning by fantastic staff. But it’s more than just that we send reminder emails, texts when we’re on the way check-ins after the service handwritten, thank you cards. We do what we say we’re going to do. And if we fall short, Hey, it’s not often, but it happens. We make sure to make things right, no matter what. And while we love all of our customers, those clients who use us on a recurring basis are very special. So we take even better care of them. We have a customer retention program where among other things, we send them specially curated gifts, which promote home happiness and show our appreciation based on the thank yous we receive and especially our very low customer cancellation rate. We know that they appreciate us back. Another special thing we give our clients is free cleaning solutions to use in between our visits. They’re the best cleaning products, people, pet, and earth safe and unrivaled by brands you buy in stores. On our first visit, we give our clients a kit and we refill the bottles every time we’re back. It’s free cleaning products for life so long as they use may brigade. I also want to mention what we do for clients who spread the word, refers to their friends and who posts reviews about us on social media reviews are invaluable gifts to us. They are seen by thousands of people every month, looking for someone to do what we do and a great review attract great new clients. So to those who post reviews, we send a special bottle of beautifully packaged olive oil that they’ll enjoy for a while. And we hope that they’ll think of us when they do. At Maid Brigade we are very customer centric and love putting together initiatives that give our clients what they’ve never expect from their main service and that they won’t get from anybody else, but Maid Brigade.

Joey Coleman (35:47):
Dan, I will say, well, forgive me. Let me say as an author. And I know you’ve had this experience many, many times before. Nothing makes you happier as an author than to find out that someone got your book, read your book, implemented the ideas and had great success from it. I mean, it is why the majority of authors, especially in the business space write books, and this was such a lovely audio for Robin share. Robin and I in the interest of full disclosure had never had any interactions before this. I didn’t even know about this recording. She was talking to Dan about it. So I just got to hear it in preparation for our episode today. And it just thrills me to see so many things that they have done and implemented in their business.

Dan Gingiss (36:35):
Yeah. I mean, definitely they read your book. They’ve been listening to the show and they’ve been implementing, which is awesome and let’s face it. I think she actually pointed this out. People don’t have particularly high expectations of the cleaning crew that comes to their house. And so as with many industries, experience is a way that you can stand out and exceed expectations with your customers. And that’s exactly what Robin is doing at Maid bBrigade. Now she gave some examples in her audio, but she also emailed us some other examples that I wanted to chat about because man, any one of these things would make Maid Brigade stand out to me as a company, but yet they’re doing all of them. So besides from that, you know, free cleaning products for life, they also offer a home happy hour where after 10 visits, they’ll take care of an extra task, like cleaning the refrigerator or sweeping the garage at no charge, which I love because that builds loyalty. Obviously, if I’ve stayed for 10 visits, now I’m staying for another 10 because I know my refrigerator can wait, but I mean, it’s a great little reward, their customers for staying with them. And it really doesn’t cost them a whole lot. Maybe it costs a few extra minutes for a crew to be there, but the impact is huge.

Joey Coleman (38:05):
Absolutely. And you know, the, one of my favorites that Robin shared, which ties to this one is that through their analytics, they have found that if they can keep a client for at least eight visits, that client will usually stay for, wait for it over 40 visits. So if they can get past eight, they’ll get to 40. Now friends, I get that you may not be in the maid business, but when you can figure out what your “keep them until” line is in your business, you know, Robyn figured it out that it’s eight visits. And then you see the dramatic impact that the retention in the loyalty has. It makes focusing on those initial visits that much more important. And what I think is interesting is eight visits. You figure the average cleaning crew is coming twice a month. Huh? Let’s see, four months. Oh that, Oh, what would that be? Just right around the hundred day mark, you know, just a little bit past the a hundred day Mark, the first hundred days really matter. So I love that they do this. And they’re specifically doing handwritten cards and gift certificates that are coming in in the first eight visits. They’re showering with the customers with love in those first few visits, because they know that that’s a foundation to build long-term loyalty from.

Dan Gingiss (39:26):
For sure. And the other thing that they do is they will also send a gift when they mess something up. And by the way, those were hers words, mess something up and I’m like, Oh, that’s funny. I like that. But Hey, when they, she did say, Hey, stuff happens sometimes and they immediately take ownership of it and they send some sort of gift. And her belief is that that gesture lessons, whatever problem was caused. And I think it certainly does. Now look, they break a fine vase where thousands of dollars, it’s probably not going to fix the vase, but I think we all know that mistakes happen. We all know that no business is perfect, but taking that ownership, not hiding behind it, not trying to sweep it under the rug…

Joey Coleman (40:10):
Bah dumb da!

Dan Gingiss (40:12):
He did that. Didn’t he, but actually coming out in front of it and apologizing and, and sending the client a gift is such a great idea because we’ve all seen those stats. That one break in the customer experience can cause someone to leave, but not if you do that.

Joey Coleman (40:29):
Yeah. It’s, it’s just a beautiful deposit in the karmic bank account that allows you to keep that customer, you know, the last one that Robin shared in her email to us, uh, which I think interestingly enough, ties back to the conversation we were having about Howard’s book and kind of this balance between big companies and little companies. You know, as we mentioned, Maid Brigade is part of a franchise. And while they certainly have their franchise website, they’re in the process, that is Robin and her husband, of putting together their own website that is based on, wait for it. Another callback here, our good buddy Marcus Sheridan’s book, They Ask You Answer, where they take commonly asked questions by their customers about their cleaning services, about when to clean, how to clean, et cetera, et cetera, and put them on the website so that they’re continuing to provide content and value for people in that digital experience. So look, this, this one’s fun. We’re getting to connect a lot of different pieces of the conversation here. And as we often talk about on the Experience This! Show, it’s not just one thing that creates a remarkable experience. It’s the blending of all the touch points, all the interactions to create the overall feeling that your customers and your employees and your vendors have when they think about you and your brand.

Dan Gingiss (41:48):
Well, Robin Murphy of Maid Brigade, I’m sorry. I used to live in Fairfield County for real. I don’t anymore, but yes, I would move just to have your company service my home. And thank you so much for listening to the show for engaging with us and hey, other listeners, you see what happens when you just send us an email or leave us a review. Next thing you know, we might be featuring your company on a future episode.

Joey Coleman (42:19):
Thanks for joining us for another episode of Experience This! You are the best listener ever!

Dan Gingiss (42:25):
And since you listened to the whole show…

Joey Coleman (42:28):
Yay you!

Dan Gingiss (42:29):
We’re curious, was there a specific part of this episode that you enjoyed the most? If so, it would mean the world to us if you could share it with a coworker, a friend or someone that just loves listening to podcasts.

Joey Coleman (42:39):
And while you’re in the sharing mood, if you felt inclined to jump over to iTunes or wherever you find your podcasts and write us a review, we would so appreciate it. And when you do, don’t forget to let us know as we might have a little surprise for you.

Dan Gingiss (42:55):
Thanks again for your time and we’ll see you next week for more.

Joey Coleman (42:59):
Experience.

Dan Gingiss (42:59):
This!